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dragox
12-14-2004, 07:01 AM
anyone know how to repair the two terminals in the beginning?

memphissheik
12-14-2004, 10:21 AM
hey all..
I'd like to know the answer that that question myself

memphissheik
12-14-2004, 10:54 AM
I figured out one solution...dragox..

pm..me..and I'll send it over

Blessèd Sith
12-14-2004, 01:13 PM
The letter one is C. I actually figured it out, just don't ask how.

The math one is (6*2) - 8 + 9 / 1 = 13 I suck at math and somehow I figured it out. Took a LOT of thinking. Hope that helps.

calpchen
12-25-2004, 07:03 AM
Blessèd Sith, that's the solution I came up with as well, which is obviously correct in the mathematical sense. However the game doesn't seem to think so.

Here's the solution that worked for me:
(6 * 2) - 8 + 9 * 1 = 13
Note the * instead of the / as the last operation.

sven10077
12-25-2004, 07:21 AM
Originally posted by calpchen
Blessèd Sith, that's the solution I came up with as well, which is obviously correct in the mathematical sense. However the game doesn't seem to think so.

Here's the solution that worked for me:
(6 * 2) - 8 + 9 * 1 = 13
Note the * instead of the / as the last operation.


Yeah it is sort of a letdown that the "really correct answer" is not the one they use as a key.

BailPanick
01-01-2005, 05:57 PM
I am stuch in the temple when you have to kill the sith masters..i cant kill them...i even go to the back of the temple and get the freedon nadd light saber and i still can only kill 2 out of the 3

sian
11-21-2010, 02:47 PM
I'm having trouble understanding one of the ancient terminal puzzles, the letter one. I know the answer – I just don't know why it's the answer.

The puzzle (answer not included):
There are six core modules (they labeled them A–F), and one is dangerously unstable and needs to be replaced. The Sith have run a diagnostic report with each module to indicate which other modules are fully operational. Four of the diagnostic reports have a single error on them. Two reports are completely accurate. The unstable module's diagnostic report is one of the two that produces accurate results.

The reports are:
A: feb, B: dce, C: eba
D: fac, E: fdc, F: acd
Which module do you replace?
I was never very good at logic puzzles, but this one is unintelligible to me. My confusion (answer spoiled):
I've seen a couple of places explain that the answer is C because it's mentioned the most times, but I don't understand the logic behind that. My bigger problem is that I can't work backward from the answer, so I assume I don't even understand the question.

Here's how I parse it: (I'm going to use capital letters when referring to the reports and lowercase when referring to the modules themselves.) Each module's report lists all the fully operational ("on", for convenience) modules in the system; e.g., A says a, f, e, and b are on, and c and d are off. I tried checking for contradictions. Like if A says e is on but E says a is off, A or E must have an error. But they all contradict each other. Ultimately I settled on visualizing the reports as a matrix where the columns are the modules and the rows are which report said the modules were on. (1 is on, 0 is off, of course.)
a b c d e f
A 1 1 0 0 1 1
B 0 1 1 1 1 0
C 1 1 1 0 1 0
D 1 0 1 1 0 1
E 0 0 1 1 1 1
F 1 0 1 1 0 1
I thought at first that the identical reports, D and F, would have to be the accurate ones. They're both reporting on the same system, so wouldn't it make sense that they both give the same report? But if we assume they are accurate, the requirement that all the other reports have one error doesn't work out; A, B, and C have two errors.

c does stand out as being the only one that's mentioned in five reports, but what does it mean? That c is probably on? So what? With four modules on and only two accurate reports, I don't see why we'd have to assume that a module has to be on to give an accurate report. And even if we know from how often it's mentioned that C is an accurate report, where is the other accurate report? Shouldn't it be mentioned just as often?

So I tried counting errors and ended up with this matrix:
A B C D E F
A 0 2 1 2 2 2
B 2 0 1 2 1 2
C 1 1 0 2 2 2
D 2 2 2 0 1 0
E 2 1 2 1 0 1
F 2 2 2 0 1 0
If the rows (or columns; it's symmetric) are the reports we assume are accurate and the columns (or rows) are the number of errors when compared with the given assumed-accurate report, the two accurate reports should have a row (or column) of four ones and two zeros. I think.

And even if any of that worked, I don't see how, once you find the accurate reports, you decide which one is the unstable module.

At this point I can only assume either none of the programmers involved noticed there's no solution or I'm doing something wrong. Occam says I'm doing it wrong.

I thought I might've misinterpreted the question and each module reported only three modules as operational, so I redid it like that and got nowhere.
Help? Please?