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VampireNaomi
12-22-2005, 10:35 AM
Out of interest I visited Grim Fandango's IMDB site and came upon this:

The game was originally going to be named "Deeds Of The Dead" but the management at Lucasarts didn't want a reference to death in the title.

What do you think? In my opinion they made the right choice. Grim Fandango is a much better name.

Charie
12-22-2005, 12:03 PM
Firstly, I think I've seen this reference somewhere on this forum earlier:). Somebody in that old thread mused whether Olivia's poem or the title came first.

Certainly the 'Grim Fandango' title sounds better, it's glamourous and mysterious, while 'Deeds of the Dead' resemble some second-rate grim humor comedy's title. And even if at the first sight GF seems to be just that - a funny tale about talking skeletons - it's much, much deeper; you need only to look a tad closer to notice that.

VampireNaomi
12-22-2005, 12:29 PM
Really? I must have missed it then. Sorry. Carry on. :)

El Virus
12-22-2005, 01:12 PM
I heard about this.
I like Grim Fandango much better, mainly because all of these apparent non sequitur titles hold a more profound meaning.

Viva Limones!
12-23-2005, 08:50 AM
I agree,

Just to flog a dead horse a Fandango is a form of flamenco music style, The fandangos form probably has more derivations than any other in flamenco.

The fandangos grande is normally danced by couples, which start out slowly with gradually increasing tempo. This is the form from which many others are derived.

The fandanguillos (little fandangos) are livelier, more festive derivations of fandangos. Some regions of Spain have developed their own style of fandangos, such as Huelva (fandangos de Huelva) and Málaga (fandangos de Málaga, or Verdiales).

The rhythm is essentially the same as for bulerias and soleares.

Also the style in wich the Skeletons appear in Grim Fandango is based on calaca doll.

Calaca (a colloquial Spanish name for skeleton) is a figure of a skull or skeleton (usually human) used for decoration during the Mexican Day of the Dead festival. Tracing their origins from Aztec imagery, calacas are frequently shown with marigold leaves and foliage. As with other aspects of the Day of the Dead festival, calacas are generally depicted as joyous rather than mournful figures. They are often shown wearing festive clothing, dancing, and playing musical instruments.

Calacas used in the festival include carved skull masks worn by revellers, small figures made carved wood or fired clay, and sweet treats in the form of skulls or skeletons.

Just more usefull/less trivia!

Charie
12-23-2005, 12:52 PM
DELETED

Charie
12-23-2005, 12:52 PM
Viva Limones!
The moral of this tale is: Wikipedia is your friend :).

Viva Limones!
12-29-2005, 05:48 AM
Viva Limones!
The moral of this tale is: Wikipedia is your friend :).

Yeah and... it rocks.

Those who dont use it should... and ... yeah!

Charie
12-29-2005, 06:07 AM
Some of them are walking Wikipedias themselves, they don't need it.