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View Full Version : I'm doing a study on fan made games. Could you answer some questions?


Linda vd Fliert
05-15-2007, 12:10 PM
Hi everybody,

I am doing a study on fan communities and participatory culture, in particular for the Monkey Island series. Participatory culture basically is when users (fans) become producers, by altering existing games/programmes/media or making their own interpretation of the original game. This is mostly done with the use of opensource software.
I know this is happening around the world, but mostly in genres like RPG. Amongst other things I’m wondering to what extent this is happening with adventure games, in particular Monkey Island.
And for that I could really use your help!

My first question to you is: Have you ever, or would you know anyone who has, made an adaptation of Monkey Island? If so, was it an adventure game or was it another genre but did it contain elements of MI (like characters, backgrounds, etc)? Did it maybe feature some next-generation elements? Basically I am interested in all fan creations in general, old school or not. But it would of course be extra special if it would ‘exceed’ the original games.


For my second and most important question, my point of reference is Henry Jenkins’ article on ‘interactive audiences’ (http://web.mit.edu/cms/People/henry3/collective%20intelligence.html), in which he basically states that there are three conditions that make participatory culture possible:

1) Fans or fan communities have the tools
Tools are software like ScummVM; just anything that would help you create.

2) A range of subcultures promote Do-It-Yourself
Fans have a collective intellegence, by giving each other (technical) support and advice. The most important point here is that many can know what one alone could never.

3) Corporate industries approve and even encourage fan participation.
Corporate industries are of course companies, big or small, that make games for money, like LucasArts or Autumn Moon Entertainment.

My second question is: do you think this is true?
- Are the tools available for everyone? Of course there is open source software for some games, but would you reckon it sufficient (most importantly for the adventuregenre, but also for their own genres). And most importantly, are those tools made only by fans, or are there some companies that put there software online for everyone to use or alter?

- Is there enough know-how in the (MI) fan communities? Do people support each other, share their knowledge, and if so, how (through forums, articles, special websites etc.)? And are there also real specialists active in these domains, or is it only done by fans?

- Is it true that corporate industries support participatory cultures, or would they actually just sue you if you would use any of their characters/worlds/etc. in your game? Furthermore, are some industries more supportive than others


To some of these questions I already have (part of) the answer (mainly thanks to Gabez!), but it would be great to get lots of info from many different people, so I can compare and analyse it. For the same reason I have posted this thread on a couple of related forums, so you could come across it elsewhere.


I really hope you guys can help me out!

Linda van de Fliert
linda.vandefliert@student.uva.nl
University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

plamdi.com
05-20-2007, 12:44 PM
My first question to you is: Have you ever, or would you know anyone who has, made an adaptation of Monkey Island? If so, was it an adventure game or was it another genre but did it contain elements of MI (like characters, backgrounds, etc)? Did it maybe feature some next-generation elements? Basically I am interested in all fan creations in general, old school or not. But it would of course be extra special if it would ‘exceed’ the original games.I have an old webpage up which included every "fan game" I knew about For Monkey 1 and 2:

http://monkeyisland.fanspace.com/files.htm

You have to left-click to download them (fanspace's hosting limitations).

You can contact "scurvyliver" at http://scurvy.adventuredevelopers.com/mail.html, he used to be on my msn list (probably still is), he answered my email no problem a few days ago, so he's contactable.

Shaw seems to be here:
http://www.shawarts.co.uk/

And although he claims "tere are no copies online any longer", all of his material (ie - "Things to come", "Monkey Island 4 part 1", and "Legands of LeChuck") are fully available for download on my old website (although if any of them had setups, I don't have those). None of them were ever completed, what you see is exactly what he made, no more no less.1) Fans or fan communities have the tools
Tools are software like ScummVM; just anything that would help you create. ScummVM does not help create games; only play legacy games. ScummVM is a cross-platform open-source SCUMM interperator (or you could call it an emulator); which allows SCUMM-based games (and some select others) to be played on different operating systems. Another tool I like a lot is VDMSound, which is no longer developed; but is fully developed and allows the emulation of old sound hardware, for use with older DOS-based games (and it works like a charm too). Some Sierra games like Kings Quest V have fan-made patches which allow the game to run normally under windows; without the use of emulation like ScummVM.

The Games Factory, Adventure Game Studio, AGAST and SLUDGE are programs I can think of for the creation of adventure games.2) A range of subcultures promote Do-It-Yourself
Fans have a collective intellegence, by giving each other (technical) support and advice. The most important point here is that many can know what one alone could never.I'd suggest looking for forums related specifically to the above mentioned tools. There's also a page at scurvyliver with some "tutorials": http://scurvy.adventuredevelopers.com/tutes.html3) Corporate industries approve and even encourage fan participation.
Corporate industries are of course companies, big or small, that make games for money, like LucasArts or Autumn Moon Entertainment.LEC certain discourraged it; see: http://scurvy.adventuredevelopers.com/about.html http://mattshaw.panicnow.net/scans.php
My second question is: do you think this is true?
- Are the tools available for everyone? Of course there is open source software for some games, but would you reckon it sufficient (most importantly for the adventuregenre, but also for their own genres). And most importantly, are those tools made only by fans, or are there some companies that put there software online for everyone to use or alter?You'd have to look into it further, but Adventure Game Studio, AGAST and SLUDGE are freeware.

Linda vd Fliert
05-24-2007, 06:28 PM
Thanks, that was some pretty useful information!
I've written the paper and am now awaiting my grade..

Gabez
05-24-2007, 07:00 PM
Good luck... let us know how you do. :)

Linda vd Fliert
06-01-2007, 02:47 PM
Thanks so much to all you guys (and a super big thanks with extra sprinkles on top to you Gabez, for starting me off), cause... I got a 9,5! (out of 10, Dutch system) So basically, that's an A!! :D

plamdi.com
06-01-2007, 11:33 PM
Good work. And I put that Perth-slob (scurvyliver) back on my msn (and emailed Shaw, and got a posative reply), lol, brings back memories!