PDA

View Full Version : Why Our Status Online Means Nothing In Real Life.


The Source
06-18-2008, 06:10 PM
Why Our Status Online Means Nothing In Real Life.

While driving from interview to interview, I was listening to an interesting conversation on the radio. One of the talk show hosts on local 96.9 FM brought up an issue, which is geared towards the next generation of workers. According to several people who I have talked to offline, I found out that Generation 'Y' is called the Milleniumists. It turns out that the 'Milleniumists', young adults between the ages of 18-27, have problems with distinguishing between online life and real life. As a result of buying into their online status, they believe that they are actually someone in real life. When it comes to working for an actual employer, the ‘Milleniumists’ are having issues with assimilating. Instead of staying to finish a project, they leave exactly at 5:00. (Other words, they don’t stay overtime.) Instead of doing certain small annoying tasks that come with a job, they believe they have a choice in picking what jobs they will do. According to what I have learned on the radio and television, some ‘Milleniumists’ believe their online persona is actually important to real life. Most ‘Milleniumists’ believe that an online prestige actually has weight on what you do offline. I am unsure if all this is true, so I want to hear your words on this topic. Just because you are special online, it does not mean you anything offline.

What do you think?

Jae Onasi
06-18-2008, 06:14 PM
I don't consider people any more special online than offline. If they're great people, they're going to be that way whether on or offline. If they're complete jerks, they're going to be that way no matter where they are.

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:17 PM
I don't consider people any more special online than offline. If they're great people, they're going to be that way whether on or offline. If they're complete jerks, they're going to be that way no matter where they are.
I understand what you are saying.

What I am looking at is the psychological aspects to how people perceive an online life, and how they weigh it against the real world.

Example: You are Jae Onasis a member of LucasForums online, but in real life you are someone's mother and wife. You have an actual job, which you use your real name and credentials. When you are online in a forum, you will say things differently than at home or in work. I hope you do anyway. Lol... Imagine if you walked around work saying, "I am the Super Moderator at LucasForus.com, and I demand respect for my online status and prestige." Some of the stuff I am hearing is that 'Milleniumists' actually believe their online prestige means something in real life.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 06:22 PM
What's the big deal, either the employees will be forced to adapt or be fired, or the employers will be forced to adapt or have a hard time adapting. Either way, no problem.

some ‘Milleniumists’ believe their online persona is actually important to real life. Most ‘Milleniumists’ believe that an online prestige actually has weight on what you do offline.

The online persona can give them the confidence to "be something" offline. I have seen nerds get the courage after first "beeing something" online. So yes, it can have an effect. I might be biased though as I'm (barley) a "mileniumist myself

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:24 PM
What's the big deal, either the employees will be forced to adapt or be fired, or the employers will be forced to adapt or have a hard time adapting. Either way, no problem.



The online persona can give them the confidence to "be something" offline. I have seen nerds get the courage after first "beeing something" online. So yes, it can have an effect. I might be biased though as I'm (barley) a "mileniumist myself
Interesting statement. Please give more information on this logic. (The bolded stuff.)

tk102
06-18-2008, 06:28 PM
Sidenote:
I think the more commonly used term (and one that's easier to pronounce) is "Millenials".

Totenkopf
06-18-2008, 06:28 PM
They're basically kids that haven't (or refuse to) grown up. In high school, even college to a lesser degree, people form clicks and may achieve status within that group. Unfortunately for most of them, it doesn't translate into the real world very well. You can even see this with rich and pampered kids who think that b/c their parents were wealthy or important that they were too. Usually, it only takes an introduction to the real world (or immersion in it) to beat the snot out of that preconception (at least for those with any sense).

@TK--you are correct, sir! (*leaves to catch ride to the house of the next PCH sweepstakes winner*)

M@RS
06-18-2008, 06:29 PM
What's the big deal, either the employees will be forced to adapt or be fired, or the employers will be forced to adapt or have a hard time adapting. Either way, no problem.



The online persona can give them the confidence to "be something" offline. I have seen nerds get the courage after first "beeing something" online. So yes, it can have an effect. I might be biased though as I'm (barley) a "mileniumist myself

Dude, I can't think of ONE person who made it big because of confidence in their online status, give us a celebrity who made it big...

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:30 PM
Sidenote:
I think the more commonly used term (and one that's easier to pronounce) is "Millenials".
Thanks man. I couldn't remember the actual designation. :)

They're basically kids that haven't (or refuse to) grown up. In high school, even college to a lesser degree, people form clicks and may achieve status within that group. Unfortunately for most of them, it doesn't translate into the real world very well. You can even see this with rich and pampered kids who think that b/c their parents were wealthy or important that they were too. Usually, it only takes an introduction to the real world (or immersion in it) to beat the snot out of that preconception (at least for those with any sense).
This came up during the conversation. It’s good to see that I wasn't the only one who may have heard of such phenomenon.

I wonder if this is what psychologists were looking for. Studying the online affects on younger people has just begun, and maybe this is just the beginning of something new.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 06:31 PM
Employers need workers, if the workers are too few to meet demand, the employers compeete with each other for the workers. If the workers wish to leave at 5:00 pm, then an employer who gives them that option will, everything else being equal, be the prefered choice for the workers.

Jae Onasi
06-18-2008, 06:32 PM
I think it gives 'nerds' a chance to practice social skills and to learn to take some risks without real-life consequences. Those skills do transfer over into real life and can help people that way.

As for my importance here--my status is about as important as the pixels it comes with. If LF disappeared tomorrow I'd miss the people here surely, but being an s-mod here doesn't mean squat in Real Life, nor does it matter on the other forums I visit.

Achilles
06-18-2008, 06:33 PM
Sidenote:
I think the more commonly used term (and one that's easier to pronounce) is "Millenials".Thank you.

Det. Bart Lasiter
06-18-2008, 06:34 PM
Dude, I can't think of ONE person who made it big because of confidence in their online status, give us a celebrity who made it big...Didn't Tila Tequila make it big by taking her whoring from offline to online?

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 06:41 PM
To be honest I think the above is part and parcel of culture, and if an individual leaves work exactly at 5pm is everything to do with the culture an individual is surrounded by (which the internet is a part of).

The internet has many psychological implications for individuals, and these can be both positive and negative; depends on the individual.

I think internet persona's can say a lot about a person; if for example I have a virtual character I design it too look as close to me as I can make it. Perhaps I'm reading too much into this but many people don't; is this because they are not happy with the way they look?

May I make a controversial statement and say; is there a relationship between inability to disgunish between the difference of on-line versus off-line activities and intelligence?

I rarely mention my online activities as I think logic dictates that internet activities are not of any real importance. I certainly wouldn't stick in my CV that I'm a member of lucasforums, I don't see what it shows...

I don't consider people any more special online than offline. If they're great people, they're going to be that way whether on or offline. If they're complete jerks, they're going to be that way no matter where they are.

I think on-line activities may give more clues as to what an individual is 'truly' like in that, because people feel less prohibited by laws, they feel they can behave more 'freely than in 'real-life' - so the question arises, why are the change on-line? I think perhaps that dangerous phenomenon of forgetting that on the other end of a computer is a human being with thoughts and feelings.

Policing the internet has proved very difficult so far for the authorities. I'm not sure it says too much for humanity that on the last statistics I heard porn sites out weigh all other sites by 3 to 1.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 06:41 PM
Dude, I can't think of ONE person who made it big because of confidence in their online status, give us a celebrity who made it big...

Greetings, I'm M, reigning champion of suicide downhill, lord of killershots and teachers nightmare, in short, you don't need jack**** to "be someone".In my eyes I have made it big, and my eyes are the only ones that matter in this case.

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:43 PM
I think it gives 'nerds' a chance to practice social skills and to learn to take some risks without real-life consequences. Those skills do transfer over into real life and can help people that way.

As for my importance here--my status is about as important as the pixels it comes with. If LF disappeared tomorrow I'd miss the people here surely, but being an s-mod here doesn't mean squat in Real Life, nor does it matter on the other forums I visit.
Both very true, healthy, and logical statements. I wonder what the long term affects of an online life will be on the 'Millenials'. When it comes to the actualities of life, normal cognitions would distinguish the difference between reality and online socialization. I don’t want to call it ‘online socialization fantasy’, but we are actually engaged in a roll playing schema.

To be honest I think the above is part and parcel of culture, and if an individual leaves work exactly at 5pm is everything to do with the culture an individual is surrounded by (which the internet is a part of).
What about your roll as an employee? If your job requires that you need to stay until a project is finished, why would you leave early from work? Wouldn't you want to stay to fulfill your obligations?

P.S. - Thanks for keeping this civilized.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 06:48 PM
but we are actually engaged in a roll playing schema.

Just like in real life, as J7 wrote: I think on-line activities may give more clues as to what an individual is 'truly' like in that, because people feel less prohibited by laws, they feel they can behave more 'freely than in 'real-life'

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 06:51 PM
What about your roll as employee? If your job requires that you need to stay until a project is finished, why would you leave early from work? Wouldn't you want to stay to fulfill your obligations?

My 2 cents; a) family and friends come first b) depends on the boss, I will give you an example from my own history. c) I often think people think jobs are far more important than they really are.

Depends on my boss to be honest; I used to work as an administrator and had to be in at 9am exactly and would get told off if late. Now I would more than happily fulfil my activities if I'm given leeway; however if the above attitude is that I'm told off for being 2 minutes late, then why should I work over time? Especially if I have another job starting at 6 and I finish at 5?

So in the above case I worked 9-5 my direct boss wouldn't give leeway; so I worked only for my contracted hours; flexi-time makes far more sense, however some people are control freaks.

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:52 PM
Just like in real life, as J7 wrote:
Yeah. Psychologists do believe that we put on social rolls, which do not actually represent our actual selves. There is a massive definition of it, but I won't get into the boring aspects of the theory.

Do you personally believe that your prestige online should be respected offline? Where do you see your online persona and its roll in real life? Do you believe that people should take notice of the social hierarchy online but in real life?

Arcesious
06-18-2008, 06:53 PM
If LF disappeared tomorrow I'd miss the people here surely,

In that case of a possibility, I think it's important that we all keep a backup forum soemwhere...

On topic:

I used to cling to forums for the same reasons many of you are describing, but not anymore... There was one time, a logn time ago, when I clinged to a forum all day long, every moment of my time when I was not at school... I was so addicted to it that over half a year I have already achieved a sum of over 2,000 posts... Ah, the dark ages of my forum going...

If I have anything to say, it's that this forum has the best community I've ever seen, and it's very nice to come to each day to participate in the interesting debates and discussions here with so many great intellectuals.

Edit: But look at my post count nowadays... I joined almost a year ago, and I only have 889 posts... As you can see, I've gotten past the horrible addiction of spam-posting. Sure, I'm kind of addicted to this forum, but my grip on and acceptance reality is as clear and solid as ever.

The Source
06-18-2008, 06:58 PM
I used to cling to forums for the same reasons many of you are describing, but not anymore... There was one time, a logn time ago, when I clinged to a forum all day long, every moment of my time when I was not at school... I was so addicted to it that over half a year I have already achieved a sum of over 2,000 posts... Ah, the dark ages of my forum going...

Was that because your offline socialization was meager? I mean no offense by the question. Just curious.

Arcesious
06-18-2008, 07:03 PM
Was that because your offline socialization was meager? I mean no offense by the question. Just curious.

Yes, at the time... At that time, I didn't have many good friends, and I lacked the logical, stong mind I have now... In attempting to be popular on a forum, I only made the people there very annoyed... You can read all about it in my blog... I do intend to reach a 1000 post count soon, which is why I've recently started postign more often, but that's only becaue I want to change my title to my own liking... I'm taking my time though, so that I do not spam up the forums in attmepting to reach 1,000 posts.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 07:05 PM
Yeah. Psychologists do believe that we put on social rolls, which do not actually represent our actual selves. There is a massive definition of it, but I won't get into the boring aspects of the theory.

Personally I think its more than a theory and is quite interesting :p

Do you personally believe that your prestige online should be respected offline?

Nope; if my online activies are so wonderful of needed prestige I'm sure they would be picked up in the real world. e.g. if an individual writes an outstanding blog, it may get recognized and perhaps lead to job opportunities.

Where do you see your online persona and its roll in real life?

My on-line persona has little effect on my life outside of being on the computer; I do try to be helpful and kind to those of you I consider friends; and don't regard any of you as any different to anyone I know face to face.

Do you believe that people should take notice of the social hierarchy online but in real life?

I dislike social hierarchies; people are people, I'm usually (especially in real-life) at the top of them, but I'll chat to anyone and I often dislike they ways those 'at the top' treat those 'at the bottom'.

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:07 PM
Yes, at the time... At that time, I didn't have many good friends, and I lacked the logical, stong mind I have now... In attempting to be popular on a forum, I only made the people there very annoyed... You can read all about it in my blog... I do intend to reach a 1000 post count soon, which is why I've recently started postign more often, but that's only becaue I want to change my title to my own liking... I'm taking my time though, so that I do not spam up the forums in attmepting to reach 1,000 posts.
It looks like there are two sides to online life. We have a set of positive aspects, which actually help people learn about themselves. On the flip side of the coin, some people take their online persona as if it actually has meaning. Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

Web Rider
06-18-2008, 07:10 PM
I think this has a lot to do with the mindset that the young are worthless and nothing. It also seems to feel like some of the sentiment I've heard from corporations that want you to be a good little cog and sit down shut up and do what you're told, regardless of how you are treated.

If may be true that even though you have 50,000 myspace friends, you are not popular in real life, but that kind of online status can give you real courage, self respect, heck, if you travel in the right internet circles, you can gain some good life skills. EX: debating online has made me a better debater in person, and debating in person has made me better online.

That new found self-respect, courage, and so on, is expressed in real life, if you respect yourself, you're not going to allow yourself to be treated like poo. If the boss says you're job is done at 5:00, you are under no obligation to work for free. Yes, there is a respect of others issue in that you should help out if it is necessary, but not to an extent that you are losing money for somebody else's benefit.

At the same time, much of this attitude of "leaving when the bell rings" has been ingrained in them in high school and college. For the formative years of their lives, millennials, (which apparently I'm part of, though I don't feel like it), have been trained to get up, move, go, stop, sit down, eat, chew and swallow to the sound of a buzzer at a specific time and within a specific amount of time.

It takes time to break out of that kind of indoctrination.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 07:14 PM
There is a massive definition of it, but I won't get into the boring aspects of the theory.

Sociology is one of my subjects, so I'm familiar with it, and I wouldn't say it's boring. I however question if it is an actual self, or if we are merely reacting to our enviroment.

Do you personally believe that your prestige online should be respected offline?

I try to avoid respecting people out of their "prestige", so no.

Where do you see your online persona and its roll in real life?

It serves little purpose in real life other than as a reminder of different "persons" I can be, it's just one role amongst many.

Do you believe that people should take notice of the social hierarchy online but in real life?

No. I dislike hierachies, I speak to my teachers with the same amount of respect as with my friends, it wouldn't be any diferent with an smod.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 07:14 PM
WR; I agreed with nearly all your post :) As do I with yours too mur'phon; we posted at the same time.

At the same time, much of this attitude of "leaving when the bell rings" has been ingrained in them in high school and college. For the formative years of their lives, millennials, (which apparently I'm part of, though I don't feel like it), have been trained to get up, move, go, stop, sit down, eat, chew and swallow to the sound of a buzzer at a specific time and within a specific amount of time.

I don't think you are part of that group, enculturation is insidious and while it may effect members of the intelligentsia the can fight against it.

It takes time to break out of that kind of indoctrination.

Indeed, and do most even have the ability to fight against it?

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:15 PM
Personally I think its more than a theory and is quite interesting :p

My on-line persona has little effect on my life outside of being on the computer; I do try to be helpful and kind to those of you I consider friends; and don't regard any of you as any one I know face to face.

I dislike social hierarchies; people are people, I'm usually (especially in real-life) at the top of them, but I'll chat to anyone and I often dislike they ways those 'at the top' treat those 'at the bottom'.
I hear you man. I am beginning to think: As long as a person is cognitive about the differences between online and offline activities, they will be able to assimilate into a company (society) with success. Personally, I have never seen the impact of a blog, and its possible lead to an actual job for a offline company.

On the other topic::
When a person is hired for a job, they have to adapt themselves to the standards of the employer. People are not hired to 'force' an employer to adapt.

On the other topic::
"Actual Self" was a psychological term, which Sociologist similar to Rollo May borrowed and introduced into Sociology from the psychologists. Hehehe... Yes, the subject is not boring, but it may be boring for the masses.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 07:18 PM
When a person is hired for a job, they have to adapt themselves to the standards of the employer. People are not hired to 'force' an employer to adapt.

Indeed; so I worked 9-5 as I was asked; however you did not get the best out of one of your employee's also, universal rules are always a bad idea as people are all different, and the more intelligent an individual, the more likely I think they are to fight against a silly system.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 07:19 PM
No but read my post, if the employer dosen't adapt when the employees have other job oportunities, they'll leave, and he/she'll be in deep trouble.

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:21 PM
No but read my post, if the employer dosen't adapt when the employees have other job oportunities, they'll leave, and he/she'll be in deep trouble.
What actually occurs is that the employer hires another employee, and the original employee gets fired. Regardless about them having another job or not. I guess it depends on what the employee is originally hired for. If the person is asking for something to change for moral reasons, I can see where you are coming from.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 07:24 PM
What actually occurs is that the employer hires another employee, and the original employee gets fired. Regardless about them having another job or not.

You really think its that easy to fire people today?

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:26 PM
You really think its that easy to fire people today? Yes I do. I think there has been a change in technology, which makes most employees 'a dime a dozen'. It’s a harshness of the technology world.

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 07:29 PM
I said either or. If there is more workers than jobs, the employees have to adapt, If there is more jobs than workers, the emplyees have to adapt. In adition, the "best and brightest" are often able to demand it, even if there is no shortage of workers.

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:31 PM
I said either or. If there is more workers than jobs, the employees have to adapt, If there is more jobs than workers, the emplyees have to adapt. In adition, the "best and brightest" are often able to demand it, even if there is no shortage of workers.Oh, iI get it! Lol... I missread your posts. Since you put it that way, you do have a good point.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 07:31 PM
Yes I do. I think there has been a change in technology, which makes most employees 'a dime a dozen'. It’s a harshness of the technology world.

Well I know in the UK it's becoming more difficult to fire people, and you would have to have examples of incompetence etc to be able to get rid of them. Only working contracted hours of 9-5 is not grounds to fire someone...

The Source
06-18-2008, 07:37 PM
Well I know in the UK it's becoming more difficult to fire people, and you would have to have examples of incompetence etc to be able to get rid of them. Only working contracted hours of 9-5 is not grounds to fire someone...
Lol... I forgot that the visitors to these forums come from multiple countries. Where I live in the United States, the employee pool compared to job availability is pretty massive. If someone wanted to get rid of an employee, they will find it easy to replace the individual. Lol...

mur'phon
06-18-2008, 07:40 PM
Remember, not all workers can do all the jobs, so it is likely several sectors where workers arent plentyfull. It dosen't help the employer in a plumber firm that there are hordes of carpenters without a job.

EnderWiggin
06-18-2008, 08:02 PM
Dude, I can't think of ONE person who made it big because of confidence in their online status, give us a celebrity who made it big...

Dude, you've got to be kidding. I think Larry Page's online status deserves confidence. And a celebrity who made it big online - have you ever heard of the porn industry? Not trying to be vulgar; it's still true.

I think it gives 'nerds' a chance to practice social skills and to learn to take some risks without real-life consequences. Those skills do transfer over into real life and can help people that way.


Yeah, but not entirely. I use skills from the real world and bring them here, not the other way around. But that's moot in this discussion.

As for my importance here--my status is about as important as the pixels it comes with. If LF disappeared tomorrow I'd miss the people here surely, but being an s-mod here doesn't mean squat in Real Life, nor does it matter on the other forums I visit.
I disagree. I think that this is most definitely a part of your real life. And not only that, but this connection we all have with you (be it good or bad) affects us. I think that has something to do with our real lives.

Why would you say that all of this isn't real?

_EW_

Arcesious
06-18-2008, 08:27 PM
Agreed, after all, the internet may be pixels and coding, but it's still a form of communication. So are cellphones, phones and TV... It may be electronic and able to hide your real identity so you can be different online, but it's still a form of communication,not too much different from talking to someone face to face.

Relenzo2
06-18-2008, 08:38 PM
Yeah. I would have to say, onlining (don't make my mistakes and use that word...) is no different from many other things: If you're smart enough to realize it's conenction to reality, interpret it with a grain of salt, and not let it control you, it's like to make you a better person. I for one like these forums so much because it lets us have these conversations which we would never get to have in real life. People may be "more free" online because they're freer to find a community with much more like intrests.
Also, the anonymity of onlining has many sides. Like on blogging, it makes it easier to be evil and insult people. However, race, religion (possibly) social status and, most relavantly (in my mind) age don't make a difference, allowing different social interaction, more "pure" interaction perhaps, based on intelligence and niceness.

Totenkopf
06-18-2008, 08:53 PM
I disagree. I think that this is most definitely a part of your real life. And not only that, but this connection we all have with you (be it good or bad) affects us. I think that has something to do with our real lives.

Why would you say that all of this isn't real?

_EW_

Most of what we do here isn't a whole lot different than if we had a big clubhouse somewhere. Unless you have skills you've developed here that might be relevant to an employer (or has helped you to become successfully self-employed), it has no direct translation into the "real world". If Jae went to work and demanded a raise b/c she's a smod on LF, she'd be laughed out of the room (at least figuratively). Now if you mean that you can incorporate some of the things you've learned here into your education, or even networked w/a fellow LF member and scored a sweet job op, then you probably have a point. Or, to take a severe turn, if someone wrote something that cut you to the quick and moved you to commit suicide, then that too would impact your real life.

As regards firing and hiring, numbers alone won't necessarily influence your ability to stay at a job if you're perceived as a negative asset. They'll just fire you and spread your work around to the rest of the staff. Given that most people aren't going to just up and quit b/c the job sucks (and most people have bills), you can't merely say blithely that.....well, if everyone quit..
My brother works in personnel at a company and every so often I hear about the crazy schemes people come up with to try to sue for losing their jobs.

jonathan7
06-18-2008, 09:03 PM
I for one like these forums so much because it lets us have these conversations which we would never get to have in real life.

Your moving in the wrong circles :xp:

I have conversations such as these quite often :)

Relenzo2
06-18-2008, 09:21 PM
Ah, mi ami. We aren't all that lucky!
If I may expound upon myself a bit, the equalizing enviornment of forums goes even deeper. I, and pretty much everyone here, will listen to a person with 1/2 posts about the same as a super-moderator (unless knowledge of the workings of the forum is an issue). This is because we know that online ranking means squat in reality, just as our real status is nowhere to be found online. So it bites into differentiation both ways. Granted, your best friend online may be a creep who throws babies into lava pits for thrills, but it won't hurt you very much because you'll never see past their computer screen (unless you meet them in person. I won't go there)
Dude, you've got to be kidding. I think Larry Page's online status deserves confidence. And a celebrity who made it big online - have you ever heard of the porn industry? Not trying to be vulgar; it's still true.

I disagree. I mean, sure, there are people who became famous online, but has any of that fame tranversed network boundries to "real" social circles? Take LonelyGirl15, for exampe (whoever she is). Try bringing her up next time people are discussing Baraq Obama or Britney Spears and you'll see what I mean?

Web Rider
06-18-2008, 10:06 PM
I don't think you are part of that group, enculturation is insidious and while it may effect members of the intelligentsia the can fight against it.
I'm 22(well, 6 days till I'm 22), so I guess I'm in that 18-27 category. I generally disagree with the "generations" thing because my parents skipped a generation, they're on average 20 years older than most of the parents of people age.

Indeed, and do most even have the ability to fight against it?
In time, I think most will develop it, though it may be a LONG time.

And I'd like to address the long running, who'll adapt first argument. Th Source really proved my point that employers have a low view of their employees and view them as cheap, replaceable, and not worth respect. If I am in a job and am paid to work from 9-5, I'm going to work from 9-5. I will likly not leave work till 5:30 or 6 because I would finish things up and help clean up(assuming the place is closing at that time). I would not however, end up leaving at 9pm. Unless of course, I was being paid for my time.

I don't work for free and if employers believe that they will be able to get free work out of us, they're the ones who need to adapt. Employers are spoiled by cheap (illegal)immigrant labor and the poor who are desperate for a job, as well as the massive push to outsource EVERYTHING. They think they can treat people like slaves back home and while I realize the attitude that they can't is hurting the market, that's just the way it works.

EnderWiggin
06-18-2008, 10:45 PM
Ah, mi ami. We aren't all that lucky!
I, and pretty much everyone here, will listen to a person with 1/2 posts about the same as a super-moderator (unless knowledge of the workings of the forum is an issue). This is because we know that online ranking means squat in reality, just as our real status is nowhere to be found online.
I won't. If I'm asking a question or I need help, having a reputation (see Achilles or Jae if you disagree with the idea that you have an online reputation) for being a knowledgeable person will make me much more likely to believe you. Especially if it has to do with experience (i.e. modding)


I disagree. I mean, sure, there are people who became famous online, but has any of that fame tranversed network boundries to "real" social circles? Take LonelyGirl15, for exampe (whoever she is). Try bringing her up next time people are discussing Baraq Obama or Britney Spears and you'll see what I mean?

No, I don't see what you mean. Larry Page had no huge reputation before his venture. And now, anyone who sees him in a room is damn stupid if they don't respect him. He has gained a good name for what he's done online.

And there are other examples of the same.

_EW_

Arcesious
06-18-2008, 11:15 PM
Well, to a degree, I depend on online reputation for being on forums, at least if only to be taken seriously. At first, usualyl no matter who you are, you start out as a 'noob' on a forum... And how seriosuly you're taken and how well the community accepts you into discussions is based off of how you act. I remember, when I first joined here, I wasn't a very knowledgable person. I was pretty arrogant and stubborn in debates... Same thing on many other forums I went to.

But, now, I've changed... With a community like this, it is easy to earn back a good reputation. Sadly, with the whole 'noob' thing taken into account, it starts out as kind of 'guilty until proven innocent', because you're new. I, honestly, would love to have a reputation like Achilles or Jae for example, but I don't worry about it. I'm happy the way I am on here, and even if you aren't the best or most well-respected one of the community, you can always learn more from the discussions and debates. And that, simply and only that, just being able to participate in a friendly discussion or a debate, that's all that really matters as far as 'online reputation' goes for me... :) Besides, who would waste the time to judge a person's reputation here? That's meaningless, really. All that matters is the socializing with so many diverse and facinating people.

Rev7
06-18-2008, 11:40 PM
I think it gives 'nerds' a chance to practice social skills and to learn to take some risks without real-life consequences. Those skills do transfer over into real life and can help people that way.

QFE. I have definately seen that in my life. :D

Your online life really doesn't have an effect on your offline life. To an extent, it is just a virtual world. Or at least that is what I see it as...

Achilles
06-19-2008, 02:15 AM
Your moving in the wrong circles :xp:

I have conversations such as these quite often :)Wait until you get out of college :(

(see Achilles or Jae if you disagree with the idea that you have an online reputation) Whut? When did this happen?

@ topic: I agree that one's "online status" on this forum or that forum does not translate into "real life", however I do think that one's ability to think, process information, absorb ideas, etc are skill sets that can be honed in one place and used in another.

Samuel Dravis
06-19-2008, 03:37 AM
It turns out that the 'Milleniumists', young adults between the ages of 18-27, have problems with distinguishing between online life and real life. It's somewhat interesting to note that social networking sites such as Facebook/Myspace are as much as part of a person's "real life" as anything else they do (good point Ender). That it takes place online is very secondary to what you're doing; it's like saying there's a massive (?) divide between talking to your friend on the phone and talking to them on myspace. To be honest I see very little difference in such cases, and any differences there are aren't really worth mentioning. Why should they be distinguished? Often there isn't any distinction.

If you mean they don't know things similar to: "be quiet in a theatre", then that's simply a lack of courtesy. They're as capable of distinguishing between appropriate times for behaviors just as well as anyone else.

As a result of buying into their online status, they believe that they are actually someone in real life. When it comes to working for an actual employer, the ‘Milleniumists’ are having issues with assimilating. Instead of staying to finish a project, they leave exactly at 5:00. (Other words, they don’t stay overtime.)People who don't feel like they're needed aren't likely to be too considerate of what the company cares about. If someone were to tell me (or give me the impression) "Do your job and get out of my face", it's not going to inspire feelings of helpfulness. In fact, it would inspire me to do what they pay me for and get out of their face (i.e. leave at 5). If a project needed doing, then the employer obviously didn't care enough about it for me to care.

It doesn't seem like this would be an only Gen Y problem; any company that just hires bodies is likely to have this sort of apathy show up.

Instead of doing certain small annoying tasks that come with a job, they believe they have a choice in picking what jobs they will do.Again, it'd probably depend on the environment. I have to do a lot of irritating, repetitious things, but I don't really mind because I like to work for the place I do. Knowing that what you do matters to others helps quite a lot for me.

According to what I have learned on the radio and television, some ‘Milleniumists’ believe their online persona is actually important to real life. Most ‘Milleniumists’ believe that an online prestige actually has weight on what you do offline.As I said in my first paragraph, it sometimes does affect how you're viewed offline. Online reputations via social networking sites can definitely change the way you're viewed by people, particularly people you've never actually met in person but are likely to at some point or another. Using a smiley at someone not favored by a social group is likely to be as disdained as smiling at them in real life.

Relenzo2
06-19-2008, 09:29 AM
I won't. If I'm asking a question or I need help, having a reputation (see Achilles or Jae if you disagree with the idea that you have an online reputation) for being a knowledgeable person will make me much more likely to believe you. Especially if it has to do with experience (i.e. modding)
_EW_

Well, yes, but I don't see the "innocent until proven guilty". I know (and hopefully everyone else knows) that the number of posts you have here has about zip to do with your intelligence. So if a Lurker says he knows the answer to my question and a mod says "well, maybe..." I might darn well just listen to the one who's sure!

Besides, who would waste the time to judge a person's reputation here? That's meaningless, really. All that matters is the socializing with so many diverse and facinating people.

Aha! Right. But I agree that people HAVE A reputation online, if not that it matters oh so much. There are certain members for which I have great respect. But usually, if the person is acting good, then I'll listen to him, and if not, then I won't.

jonathan7
06-19-2008, 09:35 AM
Wait until you get out of college :(

I met very few people at uni who would discuss things such as this; educational standards in the UK are dropping; usual uni conversations between my friends would revolve around last nights drinking antics and what was on TV :(

@ topic: On-line reputation will effect if you are listened too or not, for example spammers tend not to be listened too; while someone who continually produces good quality posts is more likely to be heard. If you are a member of a community for any amount of time; you will pick up that some individuals command more respect than others, tis the way of things. While if someone is a moderator or not has little bearing as to if I think they are worth listening too; there are those whose opinions I value more than others. And to be honest moderators general have gained their position for a reason....

EnderWiggin
06-19-2008, 11:02 AM
Well, yes, but I don't see the "innocent until proven guilty". I know (and hopefully everyone else knows) that the number of posts you have here has about zip to do with your intelligence. So if a Lurker says he knows the answer to my question and a mod says "well, maybe..." I might darn well just listen to the one who's sure!

If someone with 2 posts says it's possible to make a mod that changes the level cap in K1, and a mod (or a longer-time user) says ''Oh, I think that's wrong because it might be hardcoded," who are you going to believe?
Sureness != accuracy.
I don't care if the person with 2 posts knows exactly how to do it by editing the *.exe or not. It doesn't make it possible because he's sure of it.



Whut? When did this happen?

Oh, like you don't have an online reputation? and neither does Jae? ;)

Not sure how you can debate that point. :D


@ topic: I agree that one's "online status" on this forum or that forum does not translate into "real life", however I do think that one's ability to think, process information, absorb ideas, etc are skill sets that can be honed in one place and used in another.
I agree.

_EW_

The Source
06-20-2008, 10:10 AM
I have to make a correction. When I referred to Rollo May, I was thinking about his work on the 'Actual Self'. He was a psychologist by nature, and he was interested in 'Existentialism'. Lol... Sorry for the mix up. Lol...

tk102
06-20-2008, 10:27 AM
Sidenote:
30-somethings might find some familiar perspectives in Jeff Gordinier's "X Saves the World".
Youtube clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPdEgwOsvDk)

Jae Onasi
06-20-2008, 10:49 AM
Oh, like you don't have an online reputation? and neither does Jae?


>.>
<.<

Our covers are blown, Achilles.

jonathan7
06-20-2008, 10:55 AM
>.>
<.<

Our covers are blown, Achilles.

The names Onasi... Jae Onasi.

The names Achilles.... Achilles.

:D Well I thought that was funny!

I have to make a correction. When I referred to Rollo May, I was thinking about his work on the 'Actual Self'. He was a psychologist by nature, and he was interested in 'Existentialism'. Lol... Sorry for the mix up. Lol...

Existentialism is more in the domain of philosophy than psychology; I must confess I haven't heard of Rollo May.

Achilles
06-20-2008, 12:52 PM
Oh, like you don't have an online reputation? and neither does Jae? ;) What that reputation looks like though depends a great deal on who's holding it, no?

Ask one of the people on my friends list and they might describe my reputation one way. Ask one of the people on my ignore list and they might describe it another. Odds are that even the favorable descriptions don't all sound alike.

So at the risk of splitting hairs, pointing out that I have "a reputation" doesn't tell me much :)

Not sure how you can debate that point. :DPlease ignore what I said above then :D

Our covers are blown, Achilles.So it would seem :ninja2:

The names Onasi... Jae Onasi.

The names Achilles.... Achilles.

:D Well I thought that was funny!Foiled again. And this time by the lack of a proper surname.

*cries*

EnderWiggin
06-20-2008, 01:07 PM
What that reputation looks like though depends a great deal on who's holding it, no?

Ask one of the people on my friends list and they might describe my reputation one way. Ask one of the people on my ignore list and they might describe it another. Odds are that even the favorable descriptions don't all sound alike.

Absolutely right.


So at the risk of splitting hairs, pointing out that I have "a reputation" doesn't tell me much :)


True, but I was just using you as an example to concretely show that online reputations exist. So the fact that I didn't tell you much is a bit irrelevant. :)

Please ignore what I said above then :D

You debated what your reputation was... not whether or not you had one.

So it would seem :ninja2:

Foiled again. And this time by the lack of a proper surname.

*cries*

Sorry for ruining your secret and for you being incorrectly named.

You may cry on my shoulder if you'd like :xp:

_EW_

Totenkopf
06-20-2008, 01:46 PM
What that reputation looks like though depends a great deal on who's holding it, no?

Ask one of the people on my friends list and they might describe my reputation one way. Ask one of the people on my ignore list and they might describe it another. Odds are that even the favorable descriptions don't all sound alike.

This is true in "real life" as well. ;)

Achilles
06-20-2008, 03:39 PM
Sorry for ruining your secret and for you being incorrectly named. Apology accepted :xp:

EnderWiggin
06-20-2008, 03:40 PM
Apology accepted :xp:

:rofl:

_EW_

PoiuyWired
06-22-2008, 04:29 PM
Employers need workers, if the workers are too few to meet demand, the employers compeete with each other for the workers. If the workers wish to leave at 5:00 pm, then an employer who gives them that option will, everything else being equal, be the prefered choice for the workers.

Well, people willing to stay late and such does not always mean people that are more effective. And you do need a mix of mediocore people with more options AND people that are really effective. Obviously that best would be people that are really effective and will give you many options, but thats gonna cost you much more $$$. And chances are, they *know* they are valuable so they will be ready to "move on" in a heartbeat.

Seriously those "small annoying tasks" should be gone along with the silly rules in the system. Remember, employment market is all supply and damand. So if you are actually Better (more effective etc) at your job compared to other people that are similarly paid, chances are they would allow you to forget about the silly things and let the poorer guys handle it. Either that or you can find a better job.

Dude, I can't think of ONE person who made it big because of confidence in their online status, give us a celebrity who made it big...

As much as I HATE to accept it, there is a jerk called soulja boy.

Point Man
06-28-2008, 07:20 PM
Let me get this straight. The argument goes something like this:
1) The internet allows young people to develop an online persona that is distinct from their real persona.
2) A young person's online persona may be of higher standing within their online community than within their real-life community, such as work.
3) Young people confuse their online social standing with their work social standing and are not as committed to work because of it.

I don't buy it. I think the explanation is simpler. Young people are generally less committed to work than older people. I know I am a much better worker at 42 than I was at 22.

EnderWiggin
06-28-2008, 08:01 PM
Let me get this straight. The argument goes something like this:
1) The internet allows young people to develop an online persona that is distinct from their real persona.
2) A young person's online persona may be of higher standing within their online community than within their real-life community, such as work.
3) Young people confuse their online social standing with their work social standing and are not as committed to work because of it.

I don't buy it. I think the explanation is simpler. Young people are generally less committed to work than older people. I know I am a much better worker at 42 than I was at 22.

I'm not as old as Jim is, but I would tend to agree that what he said is true.

_EW_

Nedak
06-28-2008, 11:32 PM
Your online status can mean something, but it depends on what you do. Like if you're an average gamer who lives in your mom's basement. Your online status probably doesn't mean anything in the real world then.