PDA

View Full Version : Water on Mars


Nedak
08-01-2008, 02:18 PM
Dun dun dunn
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=au_iyOGXnyU

Your thoughts, eh?

BTW this is from today 8.1.08

stuff posted in June.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080620-phoenix-ice-update.html

however the video is the most updated version of the discovery.

Burnseyy
08-01-2008, 02:33 PM
Wow, so it's definite there used to be water, then?
If there was never life there, that would be a pity.

JoeDoe 2.0
08-01-2008, 02:35 PM
^ My thoughts exactly
Now we have to find fossilized remains of organisms that populated Mars to be certain, that may take many years...

Web Rider
08-01-2008, 02:46 PM
So there's ice on mars, which means water. So, my question is I suppose, how long ago was it liquid? To carve those canyons it must have been, so why'd it get so cold?(besides distance from the sun)

Darth_Yuthura
08-01-2008, 03:33 PM
^ My thoughts exactly
Now we have to find fossilized remains of organisms that populated Mars to be certain, that may take many years...

The Spirit and Opportunity rovers were equipped with the tools needed to find the fossilized remains of micro organisms in and on the surface of rocks. They were also dispatched to the most likely locations where water was once expected to flow. If they didn't find anything in the months they were operational, then the remains of any organisms is either much more difficult than any rover can accomplish... or there are no traces of life on the surface to be found. That doesn't exclude the possibility of life deep underground living off geothermal energy.

TriggerGod
08-01-2008, 04:08 PM
So there's ice on mars, which means water. So, my question is I suppose, how long ago was it liquid? To carve those canyons it must have been, so why'd it get so cold?(besides distance from the sun)

I'm sure this isn't very probable, but wouldn't it be possible that when the Sun first formed, Mars was closer then it was before, therefor, water would've been able to flow, creating the canyons, but after the universe fully formed, Mars was farther away, and the water was directed to the poles, which froze over.

EDIT:
700th post! :emodanc:

HerbieZ
08-01-2008, 04:16 PM
We need to send a plumber over there stat!

Litofsky
08-01-2008, 04:49 PM
Boy, I hope we find the remains of some long-lost/ancient civilization/creature.
If nothing else would unite Humanity, the 100%, undeniable existence of aliens would do that.

Or it would tear us apart. :p

Either way, that's some really cool news.

Corinthian
08-01-2008, 04:51 PM
Well, that depends on whether we find Prothean technology on Mars or a dormant alien spaceship that comes active as soon as we touch it.

Rev7
08-01-2008, 05:33 PM
Well, that depends on whether we find Prothean technology on Mars or a dormant alien spaceship that comes active as soon as we touch it.
:nod:

Litofsky
08-01-2008, 08:00 PM
Well, that depends on whether we find Prothean technology on Mars or a dormant alien spaceship that comes active as soon as we touch it.

Or a small, fossilized remain of a creature. Sarcasm isn't always a useful tool. Unless I interpreted that wrong, in which case, I apologize.

Det. Bart Lasiter
08-01-2008, 09:50 PM
Or a small, fossilized remain of a creature. Sarcasm isn't always a useful tool. Unless I interpreted that wrong, in which case, I apologize.Do not apologize to the Corinthian. It can smell your weakness.

Darth_Yuthura
08-01-2008, 11:13 PM
I'm sure this isn't very probable, but wouldn't it be possible that when the Sun first formed, Mars was closer then it was before, therefor, water would've been able to flow, creating the canyons, but after the universe fully formed, Mars was farther away, and the water was directed to the poles, which froze over.

EDIT:
700th post! :emodanc:

That's not possible. The orbit of the planets don't change to such a degree. I think it's more likely that Mars had significantly more geothermal energy... providing the heat for liquid water to flow. As that heat was lost, it became too cold for liquid water and eventually had stagnant ice that consolidated at the poles.

Arcesious
08-02-2008, 12:05 AM
Well with global destabilization and all, I don't think we'll need Mars' water for quite awhile...

Litofsky
08-02-2008, 12:16 AM
Well with global destabilization and all, I don't think we'll need Mars' water for quite awhile...

Here's to creating a colony on Mars, and waiting until Humanity on Earth destroys itself. :xp:

Nedak
08-02-2008, 12:30 AM
Here's to creating a colony on Mars, and waiting until Humanity on Earth destroys itself. :xp:

That's the last thing we need to do. Populating other planets, and ruining those.

We would be like a galactic virus.

Da_Man_2423
08-02-2008, 12:45 AM
That's the last thing we need to do. Populating other planets, and ruining those.

We would be like a galactic virus.

I'd hardly call our ability to cause havoc "galactic" at this point in time, considering our current technological capabilities.

Nedak
08-02-2008, 12:47 AM
I'd hardly call our ability to cause havoc "galactic" at this point in time, considering our current technological capabilities.

I'm obviously not talking about now, but sometime in the future...

Litofsky
08-02-2008, 01:45 AM
That's the last thing we need to do. Populating other planets, and ruining those.

We would be like a galactic virus.

Ever seen The Matrix? I believe that Mr. Smith comments that the only species similar to Humanity is the virus.

It's harsh, but it's true.

Samuel Dravis
08-02-2008, 02:51 AM
I love water! And even more, I love water on Mars! What that amounts to, my friends, is that extended stays on mars are not only possible, but likely in the future... all in all, excellent news. The real question is: why isn't this treated as something groundbreaking? After all, there's been speculation about Mars having water forever. It's too bad that most people aren't very interested.

Nedak
08-02-2008, 03:05 AM
It's too bad that most people aren't very interested.

People are too busy with Hannah Montana to learn about Mars.

Da_Man_2423
08-02-2008, 03:09 AM
I love water! And even more, I love water on Mars! What that amounts to, my friends, is that extended stays on mars are not only possible, but likely in the future... all in all, excellent news. The real question is: why isn't this treated as something groundbreaking? After all, there's been speculation about Mars having water forever. It's too bad that most people aren't very interested.

But how MUCH water is there? Yeah, sure, we may have discovered it and all, but volume is important too. Manned trips won't last long on Mars if there is hardly any of it accessible and if we solely rely on it. Not to mention who knows what might be in the water in the first place.

People are too busy with Hannah Montana to learn about Mars.

:lol:

Ascendant_Justice
08-02-2008, 01:37 PM
People are too busy with Hannah Montana to learn about Mars.

WELL said. Thank you. If someone would just bomb Entertainment Tonight and rip up Mary Hart's precious leg insurance contract...

But I digress...What wonderful news this is. Water confirmed on Mars. Think about that: there's water on a planet we used to think was a completely barren wasteland, and it's right next to us, humanity, in the same solar system. Think of the possibilities of the other 200-400 billion star systems in the galaxy.

I am a little...disappointed? in that I had not heard a single thing about this until I stumbled on this thread. I agree that this should have been breaking news on every network. But, as mentioned, Hannah Montana...

Oh, and yes, don't forget that we are, indeed, going to Mars! Just as soon as we set up our Sith mil.....er...base...on the Moon. The first time humanity sets foot on a new planet, and we'll be here, listening to five hour delayed radio messages!! History in the making.