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View Full Version : REAL OR UNREAL ???


Nick Vader
07-31-2009, 09:31 PM
This new disease, the swine flu, has become a part of everyone's fear where I live. I just wanted to know whether what the news say is true. Is it true about the victims(they say about a thousand) and the flu parties (many people with the flu gather to give it to others so that they can go through it now, when it's weakest.) ?

Just wanted to know.

Nick Vader.

JediAthos
07-31-2009, 09:41 PM
Well if by victims you mean deaths...after a quick google search...the Swine Flu deaths in the U.S (I'm not sure where you live) are listed at 353 by the Center for Disease Control. The World Health Organization has listed worldwide deaths at 816.

As far as "flu parties" as idiotic as that sounds...apparently it's true. I found several articles stating that doctors had warned parents about doing such things. It used to be a popular thing to do with chicken pox and measles apparently. (CNN article here: http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/06/30/flu.party/)

*Edit* It should be noted that I'm not a medical expert despite working in that field...Jae would be an excellent person to address this question.

Trench
07-31-2009, 09:48 PM
Flu parties? I hadn't hear about that one. Man, some people...
I wouldn't be too worried mate. As long as you have a strong immune system and you eat right, you should be fine.

Litofsky
07-31-2009, 09:56 PM
On the assumption that if you're using a computer to post such a question, you're in a Western country and/or well off: it the flu. The regular flu kills approximately 300,000 people a year (source (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/2003/fs211/en/)), whereas the swine flu has, for the number of months that it's been around, killed appriximately 800 people. (source (http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jPQkWAfBHbTMYB0uhYtB8XCfs2qA)).

I wouldn't worry too much.

...unless it mutates. :xp:

Lord of Hunger
07-31-2009, 10:19 PM
Hype, hype, hype, and more hype about nothing...the business of the American media nowadays.

Rabish Bini
07-31-2009, 11:18 PM
Here in Aus the only reason people have died in my state is because they also had an underlying medical condition, such as a heart disease.

I wouldn'e worry if I were you. ;)

Master Shake
07-31-2009, 11:31 PM
Flu parties? I hadn't hear about that one. Man, some people...
Any party's better than no party.

Darth InSidious
07-31-2009, 11:41 PM
It's a more infectious strain of ordinary flu AFAIK. While it hasn't done too much damage yet, as Litofsky mentioned, it might still mutate, and we are in the middle of the summer. Wait till the universities and schools go back before saying there's no cause for concern...

Web Rider
07-31-2009, 11:55 PM
Flu parties are stupid. The more people it infects, the faster it has a chance of mutating into something worse.

Also, I think it's a load of bull, and everyone except the very weak, and the very old are going to be fine.

Darth InSidious
08-01-2009, 12:08 AM
That's funny, given that it primarily affects those under 35. :dozey:

Darth Avlectus
08-01-2009, 02:57 AM
I had some kind of bout this year. And you know what? It's just basically your digestive system feels like mud for a while on both ends. I'm not sure, either, that the episode was that of any virus because my diet had been poor that week --I regretted that. So it could have been damage left over from the diet incident. Sure, I *could* have been sick with the bug, but I doubt it..

JediAthos
08-01-2009, 06:59 AM
That's funny, given that it primarily affects those under 35. :dozey:

Yup: this is from the U.S. CDC website:

Graph A (below) shows the estimated rate of novel H1N1 cases per 100,000 people reported to CDC in the United States by age group from April 15 to July 24, 2009. Over this time period, 43,771* probable and confirmed cases of novel H1N1 infection were reported to CDC. The number of reported cases per 100,000 population** was highest among people in the 5 years to 24 years of age group (26.7 per 100,000). This was followed by those in the 0 to 4 years of age group, whose case rate was 22.9 per 100,000 people. The rate declined further to 6.97 people per 100,000 in the 25 years to 49 years of age group. The rate was 3.9 per 100,000 people in the 50 years to 64 years of age group. At 1.3 people per 100,000, the novel H1N1 flu infection rate was lowest in people 65 years and older.

This epidemiological data supports laboratory serology studies that indicate that older people may have pre-existing immunity to the novel H1N1 flu virus. This age distribution is very different from what is normally seen for seasonal flu, where older people are more heavily impacted.

*Of the total number of cases reported to CDC, 6,741cases were omitted from this analysis due to missing ages.
**The denominator in these calculations is derived from national population census data, and is not adjusted for the actual geographic distribution of cases. This thus reflects a national average. Because only a fraction of persons with influenza symptoms are likely to have been tested for novel H1N1, these rate estimates are underestimation of the actual rates. However, the relative difference in rates between age groups is what is most important about these data.


*edit* here's the link to the U.S. CDC website which has some pretty good info: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

Nick Vader
08-01-2009, 10:09 AM
I know about the deaths and all. It's just that TV news and channels sometimes overreact, make up stories about other deceases connected with it, etc.


Also, these "parties" are really dangerous because the French,(for example) might not have a problem with the flu so-far, but doing it in other countries where things like the weather, the habbits and the food are different, it could result in a very sad mistaken result... ( Because of the organism's protections,habbits and the organism's adaptions to the environment are different in many countries.)

Thnx for responding.

Pavlos
08-01-2009, 10:24 AM
It's a more infectious strain of ordinary flu AFAIK. While it hasn't done too much damage yet, as Litofsky mentioned, it might still mutate, and we are in the middle of the summer. Wait till the universities and schools go back before saying there's no cause for concern...
What is more of a danger than simple mutation, now that it's in South-East Asia, is the possibility that it will form a recombinant strain with H5-N1 which would have H1-N1's ability to be easily passed from person to person and H5-N1's penchant for bamboozling the human immune system.

With modern universities (at least in Britain) being what they are, that is international communities of people sharing cramped and disgustingly untidy kitchens (featuring that dish that no one will wash up), come September/October, fresher's flu may turn out to be more bothersome than usual.

jawathehutt
08-01-2009, 09:18 PM
One of my proudest moments this year was standing up at the begining of a class while people were paniking about it, and delivering an improptu speech about how they were all morons for fearing an over hyped flu. I stand by that, until I hear anything about it turning into a new small pox, bring it on.

El Sitherino
08-01-2009, 09:31 PM
More people die in under a year from influenza-a than will from swine flu. It does pose a risk, but so do bees and the ferocious marshmallow.

vanir
08-01-2009, 09:39 PM
Dunno what strain, I didn't go to the doctors (not big on needles and can figure out smart over the counter medications to treat various basic symptoms) but got knocked down for 3-4 weeks just recently (still getting over it). First week was bad with the fevers, muscular aches, digestive system and finally chesty cough. One night I almost drowned in my own mucous, which gave me a bit of a scare.

I'll assume this was swine flu and contend it's pretty damn nasty. I definitely wouldn't have liked having any other pre-existing condition with it, there's no doubt in my mind that would've meant not just a doctor visit, but possible hospitalisation.

As it was I got sent home for a week at the busiest time at work in months, I was in pretty bad shape and I'm quite fit, strong and healthy.

Web Rider
08-01-2009, 09:57 PM
That's funny, given that it primarily affects those under 35. :dozey:

Probably because people under 35 have an incredibly higher chance to be in close proximity to others. As well as in young ages it's encouraged to get other kids sick to build up immunity, and in older ages(16-25) hygene goes out the window while they're STILL in close quarters.

The very old and the very young are often kept, or keep more sanitary conditions than those in the specified age groups, as well as the one group we're leaving out, 35-60, is far less likely to be found in groups where disease is common. When you are sick at work you are told to leave. When you are sick at school you are told to shut up.

Jae Onasi
08-02-2009, 11:04 AM
H1N1, or 'swine flu' as it's called, is pandemic in terms of how far it's spread, but so far seems to be very mild for the most part in terms of how badly people are getting sick. The concern initially was that it would be a widespread outbreak in its most severest form and hospitalize and kill many. Fortunately, most people are getting relatively mild versions of it. It does have a predilection for younger people, which is atypical for most flus. Most flus affect the very young and very old, whose immune systems are not as strong. This one is affecting people in their 20's and 30's, and has the capacity to make them extremely ill or kill them. Sanitation isn't the big factor in this one, or amount of time spent in public. After some study, researchers have noticed equal numbers of people at various ages out in the public exposed equally, and this virus just seems to attack people in their 20's and 30's more often than other age groups, for reasons that are not completely understood.

The people who've died from it for the most part are people who've had pre-existing medical conditions--heart problems, severe asthma, and so on. However, there have been a few reports of people becoming extremely ill and even dying who did not have pre-existing conditions.

The idea of a 'flu party' is absolutely ridiculous and should be abandoned--this is completely irresponsible. Just because most people get a mild version of the disease is no guarantee that someone else won't come down with it so severely that they end up hospitalized or dying. I sure as heck wouldn't want to host a flu party and then learn one of my friends who attended ended up in the hospital or dying.

If you have the flu, talk to your doctor about it (there are flu medications now that can cut the severity and duration of the disease), get a lot of rest and fluids, and don't go out and expose other people to it. You never know if the person you're exposing has health problems that you can't see (e.g. heart or lung problems) who should not be exposed.

To reduce your chance of getting or giving the flu (or any virus, for that matter), wash your hands often, cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough, and don't rub your eyes, nose, or mouth without a tissue.

El Sitherino
08-02-2009, 04:33 PM
Well said Jae, too bad people still have to be reminded to do simple things like wash their hands.

Jae Onasi
08-02-2009, 11:37 PM
Well said Jae, too bad people still have to be reminded to do simple things like wash their hands.
Well, now, if my kids would only remember to wash their hands without me reminding them all the time, I'd be in business in that department. :lol:

Pavlos
08-03-2009, 07:53 AM
If you have the flu, talk to your doctor about it (there are flu medications now that can cut the severity and duration of the disease), get a lot of rest and fluids, and don't go out and expose other people to it. You never know if the person you're exposing has health problems that you can't see (e.g. heart or lung problems) who should not be exposed
Just to add to that: if you live in the UK and you suspect you have flu, you are encouraged not to go to your GP, but rather to consult the NHS Direct (http://www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk/) website or free-phone the "Pandemic Flu" helpline on 0800 1 513 513.