PDA

View Full Version : Autism


Ghost
02-02-2010, 11:06 PM
I'm surprised no one had posted this thread, so I will. In some news shows, they have had specials which discuss Autism. I know Larry King has on CNN, but only a few others have as well. Autism is a genetic disease that occurs before birth, and plagues them for life. I know that there is many variants of Autism. Aspergers is one of them. Some people confuse Autism with down's syndrome, but if you study people who do have very closely, you will notice the difference. Many cannot talk, have a weird personality, and/or are influenced easily by other people, especially by adults. I know there are many other symptoms of Autism, but I'm not good with names. Some parents feel Autism is a curse, others a blessing. Many parents are just not equipped for the challenge.

I read in the Newspaper that people are studying how Autism works, and maybe how to treat it. There has been a debate about it for years, whether to pay attention to it or not. Hopefully we can stabilize our economy, however impossible as it seems, and then it may be possible to fund a program to research some more of it. Like a grant or something. I think a few colleges have applied for a grant to study Autism but I'm not exactly sure

I don't have a direct source, but I have gathered information from various sources over the years. Yes criticize me if you must, but I have done my best. I will research more if i have the time. I would like to know your thoughts on the issue. I have added this as a summary of what I know of the illness

Tobias Reiper
02-02-2010, 11:20 PM
I actually have Asperger's syndrome, and lemme tell you right nao, if I was given the option to take it away, I'd refuse.
This syndrome keeps things entertaining, and comes with some advantages.
People usually find my oddness entertaining, as well.

mimartin
02-02-2010, 11:42 PM
One of my favorite people in the world is touched by Autism. She is really a second cousin, but in my family she is closer than a niece to me. If something happens to her parents I will become her guardian and I have invested a great deal of my time and income to insure that no matter what she is cared for properly the rest her life.

While I could not love her more if she were completely normal, I would give anything to spare her the difficulties she has endured and will endure due to Autism. Beyond that I have nothing to add to this debate since I am hardly unbiased and it is too emotional of a topic for me.

VarsityPuppet
02-02-2010, 11:46 PM
^ That's really cool.


I am minorly annoyed by each term however. Not because I have anything against autism and/or people with aspberger's, but for other reasons.

My aunt (a character to say the least) has tried to falsely diagnose me with autism on several occasions. Basically, any personality flaw I have is subject for such.

I obsess to easily? Autism
I'm good at math? Autism
I'm too shy to converse with people occasionally? Autism.

Seriously it's quite annoying.

Ghost
02-02-2010, 11:54 PM
I actually have Asperger's syndrome, and lemme tell you right nao, if I was given the option to take it away, I'd refuse.

Wow, I have that too. I was diagnosed when I was 6. I read in a news article that autistic kids can be smarter than normal. Hmm.

Anyway, Aspergers is not a common variant. Although I do know another person who has Aspergers. He's kind of like me, but younger.

I obsess to easily? Autism
I'm good at math? Autism
I'm too shy to converse with people occasionally? Autism.

I do that too, maybe your aunt's right :p Being Autistic isn't a bad thing, it's actually a really good experience, although It holds me back on some stuff, it gives me great advantages on the other.

I think I got Autsim from my mom because she has it too.my grandmother says she diagnosed it, but she is a doctor so I gotta take her word for it

Jae Onasi
02-03-2010, 12:15 AM
There is a ton of medical and psychological research going on in the field of autism. There are many university and medical center studies that are getting a lot of federal and state dollars to research this condition. There are probably more dollars going to research things like heart disease and cancer because those diseases kill people, and so any research on life-threatening diseases will get priority from the NIH in the US and equivalent gov't agencies in other countries.

Ghost
02-03-2010, 12:22 AM
oh well. True Cancer does kill, my friend died of it (RIP), but still, Autism is my first priority

Jae Onasi
02-03-2010, 12:43 AM
oh well. True Cancer does kill, my friend died of it (RIP), but still, Autism is my first prioritySorry about your friend.
While it may be your first priority, when the gov't evaluates where to put research dollars, they look at reducing mortality and morbidity. Diseases that kill or seriously impair people get more funding dollars than those that don't. Autism does get quite a few research dollars, but since it doesn't kill, it's not nearly as widespread as things like heart disease or cancer, and people can live and function with this condition in the milder forms, it's not going to get as much attention.

Ghost
02-03-2010, 12:59 AM
Hmm. Well, for some people it can be hard to live with Many confused me with ADHD because I have so little symptoms and high functionality (my school district was one, but I think they were just being cheap so they didn't have to pay for my school), but the diagnosis will stand for life. Sometimes it can get out of hand, and you can make baaad decisions, like drugs, get violent, or anorexic (refuse to eat) A lot of kids can go to Juvie hall or Residential for that stuff because:

a. their parents don't care

b. they are tired of their kids

c. the kids purposly seek the attention.

Of course, this is starting to get into ADHD and Bipolarism

EDIT: Oh, and she passed a while ago. Good friend too. While it is sad, I've come to accept it

Pho3nix
02-03-2010, 10:31 AM
I actually have Asperger's syndrome, and lemme tell you right nao, if I was given the option to take it away, I'd refuse.
This syndrome keeps things entertaining, and comes with some advantages.
People usually find my oddness entertaining, as well.
While I'm sure Asperger's syndrome is medically supported and all, I find it ludicrous to diagnose "weirdness" in people.

Jae Onasi
02-03-2010, 01:19 PM
No personal attacks on anyone here, please. All of us have a bit of abnormality in them somewhere. :)

VarsityPuppet
02-03-2010, 01:23 PM
I do that too, maybe your aunt's right :p
it

It is possible, but I highly doubt it. Besides, such a thing would be difficult to diagnose I imagine, for anyone but a doctor, I mean. My aunt is not a doctor by the way, she's... I don't know... probably a tad autistic herself, and a definite hypochondriac.

I just refrain from diagnosis of any mental issues. Well, self-diagnosis anyways.

On the other hand, I'd rather not be told what's going on in my mind by someone other than myself. I just see it as an excuse to justify certain behaviors., but I'm certainly not educated in those fields.

So it's moot point.

Ghost
02-03-2010, 06:22 PM
touche. Autism is hard to diagnose

I find it ludicrous to diagnose "weirdness" in people.

I prefer to say it as unique or singularity, more kind. ;). Many would get mad at what you just said, but I've heard it before so its nothing new to me

Q
02-03-2010, 06:28 PM
Asperger's is becoming the next ADD.

@JMII: I'd get a second opinion if I were you. I wouldn't let a family member be my doctor any more than I would let one be my attorney. Emotions have a tendency to cloud a person's judgment.

@VP: It sounds like your aunt's the nut in this situation, so just ignore her until you turn 18, then you can say whatever you want to her, like "STFU" for instance. :p

Ghost
02-03-2010, 06:33 PM
I have had multiple opinions. Five psychologists have seen me. 3 have said I have Aspergers. 1 said ADHD, and the other said Bipolar. I take the majority

purifier
02-03-2010, 06:43 PM
I actually have Asperger's syndrome, and lemme tell you right nao, if I was given the option to take it away, I'd refuse.
This syndrome keeps things entertaining, and comes with some advantages.
People usually find my oddness entertaining, as well.

Actually TR...I found some of your philosophical view points, that you've mentioned here in the past, most intriguing. You've brought up some things, philosophically, that I,ve never even considered before. That could be, one of the advantages you have with Asperger's syndrome. :)

All of us have a bit of abnormality in them somewhere. :)


:raise: What ya mean "All of us have a bit of abnormality in them somewhere", why I'll have you know Momerator, that I'm just simply insane without any abnormalities, thank you very much (though not yet certified). :carms: As a matter-of-fact...my 6 foot, white fluffy, carrot eating friend here agree's with me - Isn't that right Sam?......*looks around room*........Sam?!?

Now where in the hell did he hop off too?
Damn'it! He's never around when you need him.:fist:

Tobias Reiper
02-03-2010, 06:59 PM
Actually TR...I found some of your philosophical view points, that you've mentioned here in the past, most intriguing. You've brought up some things, philosophically, that I,ve never even considered before. That could be, one of the advantages you have with Asperger's syndrome. :)There's plenty that has gone on in my life to make you think, Asperger's is a part of that, yes.

Ghost
02-03-2010, 07:07 PM
many people suspect Aspergers make people more smarter, and I think that is true. I'm in 8th grade and I do Geometry for math, thank you Aspergers

purifier
02-03-2010, 07:27 PM
QUOTE by TR....
There's plenty that has gone on in my life to make you think, Asperger's is a part of that, yes.

Well, I would look it as a positive then, I'd say that's a fine quality and a great ability to have IMO - as far as "Asperger's Syndrome" goes. ;)





many people suspect Aspergers make people more smarter, and I think that is true. I'm in 8th grade and I do Geometry for math, thank you Aspergers


Funny you should mention that, I thought I read somewhere - were they believe that Einstein and Newton possibly had "Asperger's Syndrome."

It would make a lot of sense. :)

Ghost
02-03-2010, 07:39 PM
Yeah, people said Einstien was a litte "off" but thats just how he was. Idk if newton has Aspergers though, but it would not surprise me if he did

Jae Onasi
02-03-2010, 07:53 PM
Newton was exposed to mercury, which affected him mentally as time went on.

Ghost
02-03-2010, 10:35 PM
ahh, but he did not seem that mentally ill in records, or maybe I misread something :raise:

Darth Avlectus
02-04-2010, 04:52 AM
Well, now I wasn't aware asperger's syndrome and autism were anything the same or similar.

I do hate how certain general behaviors and traits automatically gets you labelled as one thing or another.

Have a friend who is autistic. It's not something of his behavior he can control. He has an insanely high grasp of math, and can replicate a 3-d model by sculpting, whatever he's set upon, almost to a tee. I.E. He has molded the dirt and mud in his back yard after the Hollywood highway system, he has also remade what was a photo of Mars' surface. He can't really have a normal conversation and his ways of examination are unusual, aggressive and direct.

(Wonders if generations of breeding super highly analytical people might make a genetic factor.)

Interesting and unusual people. I'm aware it is a condition of the brain, perhaps an abnormality that varies in severity. Some are amazingly and highly functional, others can only paw at walls and crawl around and can't talk--or something similar like that (all cases are different).

Certainly, I'm interested to know the realities (layman's as possible, please) of this. If I am mistaken, please do enlighten me. In general, I think high functioning autistic people can do things average people could not hope to do in logical activities and such.

Jae Onasi
02-04-2010, 01:59 PM
Asperger's used to be considered seperate from autism. However, researchers now think Asperger's is a mild variant of autism.

Ghost
02-04-2010, 05:00 PM
I thought that they always knew it was part of autism

VarsityPuppet
02-04-2010, 06:39 PM
I do hate how certain general behaviors and traits automatically gets you labelled as one thing or another.


I know, right? I've tried for over an hour to come up with a satisfactory voicing of my opinions on such, but I... just can't. It all pisses me off. Categorizing ****...


@VP: It sounds like your aunt's the nut in this situation, so just ignore her until you turn 18, then you can say whatever you want to her, like "STFU" for instance. :p

Oh, yes, she is a total nut. I won't pretend to know what's wrong with her mentally, so I'll say that she's f***ed up in the head.

I'm already older than 18, but I haven't seen her lately anyways. Easier for me, as much as I'd feel empowered by cussing her and my uncle out.

Q
02-04-2010, 06:54 PM
I'm already older than 18
Oops. Sorry. :)

Samnmax221
02-04-2010, 07:05 PM
ahh, but he did not seem that mentally ill in records, or maybe I misread something :raise:
No, just an Oedipus complex.

Darth Avlectus
02-05-2010, 05:33 AM
I know, right? I've tried for over an hour to come up with a satisfactory voicing of my opinions on such, but I... just can't. It all pisses me off. Categorizing ****...


Oh, It's people running around with a know-it-all mind "diagnosing" everything. A "diagnosis" or knowledge is not an understanding. Of anything. Period. Some people just need to be put back down in their place.

Ever notice how effective this is for reasoning when suggesting putting kids on medications? I think there are several doctors that are in the pockets of pharmaceuticals who also profit off of this. It's like everyone needs to be on pills or something. If not by one's own deficiency, by someone else's standards. It's disgusting.

Also I frown upon people who do a charade to get special attention/treatment as it really is an insult to those with real disabilities. This alone is an entire subject that could fill another thread. However, I don't typically like spending my time looking down on others.

It amazes me how every little thing is a "disability": I haven't met many people who wouldn't (very) generally fit into something. Men it's ADD/ADHD, or women it's bi-polar. If everyone has it, then it doesn't qualify as a handicap or a disability.

Tobias Reiper
02-05-2010, 06:35 PM
^Bah, that bunch just wants to sell us more pills.
Listen, if you're a parent who has a child with ADD or anything like it and the Doctor tries to give you pills, refuse, if your kid is already on Pills, throw them out the window as far as you can.
Your child does not need them, and I did not either. I can function properly without them, in fact, often I'd get called up to the offices and get told that they were putting me in a class that was difficult enough for me, because the classes I were in were too much of a cakewalk.
So really, if I had excellent grades in school without popping pills every morning, why can't anyone else?
Simple Answer:No reason at all. They all can do it if they work hard enough, just as I and dozens of other people have.

Samnmax221
02-05-2010, 08:20 PM
^Bah, that bunch just wants to sell us more pills. Listen, if you're a parent who has a child with ADD or anything like it and the Doctor tries to give you pills, refuse, if your kid is already on Pills, throw them out the window as far as you can.
Your child does not need them, and I did not either.
That's a really stupid attitude. I have ADHD, although I got the hyperactivity under control without the need for pills long ago, Stratera helps me focus in boring classroom environments. Just because it gets over-diagnosed doesn't mean it doesn't exist, in addition most Doctors aren't just out to fill you full of pills to pad their wallets.

HHHHHUUUURRRRRR BOOOTSTRAPS!!!

Ghost
02-05-2010, 08:51 PM
Oh, It's people running around with a know-it-all mind "diagnosing" everything. A "diagnosis" or knowledge is not an understanding. Of anything. Period. Some people just need to be put back down in their place.

Ever notice how effective this is for reasoning when suggesting putting kids on medications? I think there are several doctors that are in the pockets of pharmaceuticals who also profit off of this. It's like everyone needs to be on pills or something. If not by one's own deficiency, by someone else's standards. It's disgusting.

Also I frown upon people who do a charade to get special attention/treatment as it really is an insult to those with real disabilities. This alone is an entire subject that could fill another thread. However, I don't typically like spending my time looking down on others.

It amazes me how every little thing is a "disability": I haven't met many people who wouldn't (very) generally fit into something. Men it's ADD/ADHD, or women it's bi-polar. If everyone has it, then it doesn't qualify as a handicap or a disability.

...... :dozey:

Are you a doctor? Because only Doctors can truly classify disabilities. Calling Autism an "insult" for being called a disability or handicapped is wrong. Heres why: When you are in wheelchair, that is a disability, but with Autism, Bipolar, and ADHD, they struggle every day, even those who say they don't. Many mentally handicapped children go into drugs, especially Bipolar kids. I went to a school which dealt with drugs and achohol abuse as well as other disorders,(also was a school for smart kids) and pretty much all of them had disabilities including ADHD, Autism, and Bipolar.

I'm not saying other types of handicapped like spine injury are lesser, but Autism is much more serious then you assume. And your "special treatment" as you say they get, is not always true. Some can function without it. Usually the "special attention" is only temporary.

On your part of "doctors make a profit" part of your little speech, actually the insurance companies are what make the profit. See, they are all about money. And the pills give both the Doctors and the Insurance companies money. Because most of my medical bills are paid by my insurance, like my pills for instant, but then they get paid eventually. Most Doctors are trained in these disorders to handle them with care, but they aren't all in it for the money.

I'd suggest you read some books on Autism, it would give you more than one opinion on this

Jae Onasi
02-05-2010, 09:02 PM
I think there are several doctors that are in the pockets of pharmaceuticals who also profit off of this. It's like everyone needs to be on pills or something. If not by one's own deficiency, by someone else's standards. It's disgusting.
^Bah, that bunch just wants to sell us more pills.Doctors get zero revenue from selling pills. At most we get a rep bringing us some samples for our patients and perhaps some brand-name pens at conferences. We doctors do not 'push pills' for the sake of getting people on medications. In fact, prescribing medication without an appropriate diagnosis is malpractice. We prescribe based on research presented in medical journals and at conferences about various diseases, and we don't take that responsibility lightly. We have to live with the results of someone having adverse side effects that may be worse than the medications we prescribe, so we are cautious about using the correct drug for the correct time and at the correct dose.

Listen, if you're a parent who has a child with ADD or anything like it and the Doctor tries to give you pills, refuse, if your kid is already on Pills, throw them out the window as far as you can.
This is, frankly, horrible advice and should not be followed by anyone. Stopping certain medications abruptly can cause severe health and mental problems. Medications should not be stopped suddenly without consulting a medical professional. Medications should be taken as prescribed. If you don't like the diagnosis by the first professional, get a second or third opinion as needed.

Your child does not need them, and I did not either. It would be wise for you to at least get your medical degree, do your residency, and see the patient, first, before you determine a child does not need medication.

I can function properly without them,Just because you are able to function without medications does NOT mean others can.

in fact, often I'd get called up to the offices and get told that they were putting me in a class that was difficult enough for me, because the classes I were in were too much of a cakewalk.
And your experience as one person means everyone else is going to react the same? That assumption is unwise.

So really, if I had excellent grades in school without popping pills every morning, why can't anyone else?Because everyone else has different body chemistry, anatomy, and physiology. Have you studied all that for a minimum of 8 years of college and professional school? No? I didn't think so. That's why individuals should consult medical professionals who are thoroughly trained in this condition rather than getting medical advice from a stranger on a Star Wars forum.

Simple Answer:No reason at all. They all can do it if they work hard enough, just as I and dozens of other people have.
Wonderful for you. Not everyone has brain chemistry and physiology that are exactly the same as yours. "Working hard enough" may be entirely ineffective for those whose brains simply don't have enough of or the correct balance of certain chemicals.

jonathan7
02-05-2010, 09:13 PM
^Bah, that bunch just wants to sell us more pills.
Listen, if you're a parent who has a child with ADD or anything like it and the Doctor tries to give you pills, refuse, if your kid is already on Pills, throw them out the window as far as you can.
Your child does not need them, and I did not either. I can function properly without them, in fact, often I'd get called up to the offices and get told that they were putting me in a class that was difficult enough for me, because the classes I were in were too much of a cakewalk.
So really, if I had excellent grades in school without popping pills every morning, why can't anyone else?
Simple Answer:No reason at all. They all can do it if they work hard enough, just as I and dozens of other people have.

Sir, this is perhaps the most irresponsible and most ill thought out post I have ever seen here at Lucas Forums, speaking as an individual from a country where the medication is free for individuals with autism, I fail to see why doctors would give out medication unless they thought patients needed them.

I presume my father who has cardiac hyper-tension (and is also a Doctor) should stop taking his medicine and he would still be fine? (Actually he would only live for a few days, before suffering a pulmonary embolism). Furthermore often mentally ill people think they do not need to continue with medication as they feel better; often their families do not share their sentiments.

Darth Avlectus
02-06-2010, 06:05 AM
Just a note: That homeschool thread in ahto: I was just being a cyinical *** hole. (Why so serious?) Though on a side note, I'm glad people *do* care.

...... :dozey:

Are you a doctor? Because only Doctors can truly classify disabilities.
Are *you* a doctor? No? Then you're no more qualified than I am.


Calling Autism an "insult" for being called a disability or handicapped is wrong.

That's *not* what I said. Clarification: I was lobbying on behalf of those with autism in the face of those who would try to 'ride' the system. Reread what I said.

Perhaps you should ask clarification instead of going off like that?

Don't confuse what I'm saying: there are people who truly HAVE disabilities. Then there are people who although having problems, do not have disabilities. Fitting into one category or another, yes. Over time these ones have shown they have problems because they don't care to move past them.

I'm on your side!

Clear enough?

Heres why: When you are in wheelchair, that is a disability, but with Autism, Bipolar, and ADHD, they struggle every day, even those who say they don't.

I never said they didn't struggle nor that they weren't problems. However, if you look at the symptoms of ADHD/ADD and bipolar, they could fit almost anyone. If almost anyone could have it, then it is not a disability. It's a problem, but if it is not a set of uncommon or unusual handicaps then I do not see how it qualifies as a disability. Furthermore, the struggles for these people CAN be worked around and controlled so that they lead a productive life.

I'm willing to make exceptions for cases of those who were naturally born with a chemical imbalance or are hardcases of abuse/emotional disturbance/etc.

For ADHD/ADD: How can you tell me it's legitimately a disability when under select cases I.E. playing video games, or cards, or drawing, etc. they can do it for hours and hours on end without taking a break? They can't focus on anything else like that, but they can do it on video games or fun activities? This shows me they CAN continuously focus on a task, but have selective attention and are at least aware of it enough to differentiate from one task to another. Even with meds, the eventual truth is these kinds of people are just going to have to move past their setbacks and function just like everyone else. Yes, it is more difficult for them--but at the same time most of them could have have some advantages most people don't. Enthusiasm, creativity, perspective.
These people don't have the same hindrances that autistic people do.

I have seen people who are diagnosed "bipolar" but when examining their background I've noticed 2 basic but major differences though there is definitely probability of overlap:

1) Those who actually have chemical imbalances in the brain and are a hair's breadth away from being bat **** nuts. These I'd call legitimate disability: Most of them want to get better or at least function on some level of regularity of society. May be unable to, however, because it is beyond their control. (The best artist I ever knew had this problem and schizophrenia on top, but he went on to do great things and even inspired me to keep trying for better.)

2) Others flip out when pressed for a task or stressed in other ways and they also do it more constantly and severely than most people. These latter bipolars don't have the same sort of disadvantage/internal chemical issues that the other bipolars have. They seem just fine for the most part.

EXCEPTION: For some it stems from home issues and abuse--understandable (I'll give the stronger of cases ones a pass, the marginal ones lenient only to a point). However this is not necessarily the majority of these cases, or we'd have a huge problem with child abuse/neglect in this country. These ones may have a tainted point of view because of their experiences. They have hardship mental and emotional scars from horrible treatment they never deserved and may never quite see things rationally because of it.

Where it *isn't* hardcases of abuse/dysfunction, it is that they don't have good control over their emotional outbursts and are very unstable/insecure.
It eventually boils down to "do they care to actually work around it?" All the meds and good counsel in the world can't do for them what they won't do themselves. They don't control their outbursts and as a result do not function to a level of most others in society. Like the ADD/ADHD crowd, these people do not have the same hardship as Autistic people--or their abused/neglected counterparts.

Many mentally handicapped children go into drugs, especially Bipolar kids. I went to a school which dealt with drugs and achohol abuse as well as other disorders,(also was a school for smart kids) and pretty much all of them had disabilities including ADHD, Autism, and Bipolar.

The hole in that argument is: Drugs and alcohol are a coping mechanism to turn to for these people as well as people who don't have these issues.

I'm not saying other types of handicapped like spine injury are lesser, but Autism is much more serious then you assume.
:dozey::mad:
Please point out where I specifically invalidated autism? I was on YOUR SIDE. Go back and reread the post--I never invalidated autism (I was actually lobbying in favor of it while frowning at people who try to ride the system). Please try to clarify what another says instead of assuming what they're saying.

Generally: What I am disgusted with are how quick we (as a society, parents, schools, peers) are to give pills for this, pills for that--for everything in general. If medication is needed, then by all means give them the meds they need. For all others whom are not at least a strong to definite/terminal case--other methods should be sought first. There are so many drugs we give kids nowadays. Although they are considered safe, the long term consequences won't be known for some time. I suggest that instead of risking this damage on patients like guinea pigs, that all other methods be tried first in real earnest.

:words:
I'd suggest you read some books on Autism, it would give you more than one opinion on this
:¬::¬::¬:
You are, again, still assuming I was invalidating autism. I wasn't. :swear:

It was a side discussion that I am disgusted how there are so many drugs out there for kids, and how everywhere I turn nowadays: your kid has this problem, get them this drug. Your kid has that problem, have your doctor prescribe them this. I guess I stand corrected about doctors in the mean time.

I could be being unreasonable but, drugs shouldn't be turned to first or second.

Ghost
02-06-2010, 11:28 AM
1. Drug's are not the only part of the problem. A lot of kids have to have these pills every day, and no I am not a doctor, but my mom is. Want to talk to her?

2. As I said, Medical Insurance companies are the ones who are ripping us off bit by bit, and that is what makes pills so damn expensive. These pills keep kids, say Bipolar, from going depressed, or getting too energetic. That's why pills are such a big deal.

3. You may be right on your opinion of ADHD, but they still do struggle. Yes I see those kids play vid games all day, but that does not mean they are below the spectrum.

4. As I said, pills are necessary, they aren't what tells who you are, they are what helps you with your "issues", and help you get better.

So I wasn't trying to piss you off, but I guess I may have misread your post. I am sorry for that

Darth Avlectus
02-06-2010, 05:27 PM
1. Drug's are not the only part of the problem. A lot of kids have to have these pills every day, <snip>

2. As I said, Medical Insurance companies are the ones who are ripping us off bit by bit, and that is what makes pills so damn expensive. These pills keep kids, say Bipolar, from going depressed, or getting too energetic. That's why pills are such a big deal.

So then, what? If they are the stronger cases then they need medications--I'm not really contesting that.

Otherwise, all other options ought to be exhausted first because drugs are not always the best solution. What is best accords to the situaiton and the individual.

I'm not saying drugs aren't needed--they should, however, not be the preferred choice to deal with most every case.

and no I am not a doctor, but my mom is. Want to talk to her?

You were intent on busting my chops because you disagreed with me--so I gave it right back to you. Nothing personal but please try to understand another's sentiment before laying into them.

3. You may be right on your opinion of ADHD, but they still do struggle. Yes I see those kids play vid games all day, but that does not mean they are below the spectrum.

I reiterate: it _IS_ a problem, but you cannot tell me it is absolutely a disability, or that it is beyond the control of the individual.

I never thought I'd say this: I agree w/ TA that students at some point need to step the **** up.

When it comes to underachievement, that's a problem that is not just of parenting, but a societal one as well. We seem to practically embrace and celebrate taking the easy way out, or are used to things being quick and easy.

4. As I said, pills are necessary, they aren't what tells who you are, they are what helps you with your "issues", and help you get better.

Well, you're the one telling everyone else to leave a proper diagnosis to the doctor. Practice what you preach and I won't have a problem. :p

As a doctor would say: Case by case according to what is best for an individual.

So I wasn't trying to piss you off, but I guess I may have misread your post. I am sorry for that

Very well.

Web Rider
02-06-2010, 08:24 PM
IMO, autism is overdiagnosed, and has in many ways become the next "fad" disorder. There's a "burden complex" among a lot of parents who think having a "special needs" child makes them oh-so holier than thou. Which only puts more pressure on reasonable doctors to misdiagnose kids in order to make a living. It's all just disgusting.

Of course, the kids who lord their mild autism or aspergers over others like they're superior humans piss me off to no end. People need to stop being so obsessed with being such special little snowflakes.

Ghost
02-06-2010, 09:07 PM
Okay, I don't want to argue anymore with you GTA, you've made your point and so have I. Lets leave it at that. :p

autism is overdiagnosed

Not true, while it is more common than other disorders, it is a very low chance that you could have it. Larry King discussed this on CNN

and has in many ways become the next "fad" disorder.

Source? Autism is more important than you think.

there's a "burden complex" among a lot of parents who think having a "special needs" child makes them oh-so holier than thou

All parents think their child is important, or even more important than others, so Autistic Kid Parents are not much different than normal parents. They have to go through a lot, especially with low-functioning Autism

Which only puts more pressure on reasonable doctors to misdiagnose kids in order to make a living.

Only qualified doctors can be truly sure it is Autism, usually psychiatrists.

Of course, the kids who lord their mild autism or aspergers over others like they're superior humans piss me off to no end.

Really, because usually Autistic children are either bullied, harassed, or made fun of because they are "weird" to other kids. I've seen this at many schools which hold both Autistic and Normal Kids. So, in fact, they don't Lord it over other people. Aspergers is a beautiful experience which only few can be in it, but that doesn't mean they/we are better than you or others.

People need to stop being so obsessed with being such special little snowflakes.

Its not an obsession, it's a serious issue that many have addressed. This debate is over that issue. As Jae said we all have a little abnormality in us.

Jae Onasi
02-07-2010, 12:21 AM
Which only puts more pressure on reasonable doctors to misdiagnose kids in order to make a living.
There are plenty enough sick people out there that we reasonable docs don't need to intentionally misdiagnose in order to 'make a living'. Secondly, misdiagnosing leads to a. lawsuits and b. loss of license and c. loss of career. Thirdly, intentionally misdiagnosing to gain more revenue is called fraud, and will get us put in jail along with getting slapped with hefty fines, so we don't do that. OK, there are a rare few try to do that, but they get caught eventually.
If there is going to be a misdiagnosis, it's far more likely that it's because the doctor was skipping doing tests in order to see more patients in a day, and thus missing critical signs of disease. There are 2 people in my entire career of working with hundreds of doctors who I would report to the state boards, and both were running patients through the mill and not doing tests they should have been doing. As a result, they didn't diagnose the diseases that were patently obvious to any 2nd year medical student if they'd just taken the time to look properly. I have read a story about cataracts being over-diagnosed by a surgeon in Chicago, so that the surgeon could get the revenue by doing the surgeries, but that guy ended up in jail after getting caught doing that a few years later.

Totenkopf
02-09-2010, 12:56 PM
2. As I said, Medical Insurance companies are the ones who are ripping us off bit by bit, and that is what makes pills so damn expensive. These pills keep kids, say Bipolar, from going depressed, or getting too energetic. That's why pills are such a big deal.

Oh really? So then it's not Big Pharma that makes the expensive meds, but the mean ole insurance company that causes them to be oh-so-expensive? Gee, wouldn't it be nice if you could just grow them on trees in your own backyard. :rolleyes: So, who's supposed to subsidize "your" meds? Everyone else (through taxes or higher med costs of their own)?

@Jae--I agree. It's also why BO's calculated insult to doctors was so stupid. There are doctors that break the law, but there are people in a whole slew of other professsions that do also. To suggest that they do operations JUST to line their pockets was unnecessarily and incorrectly offensive. That's politics, though, I guess...

Ghost
02-09-2010, 04:59 PM
i did not say the pharm companies were innocent, they charge us too, in fact I had a problem getting my prescription from the local meds store, so I had to go clear it up as they wanted to charge me more than I agreed for. So they BOTH are the problem.

Shem
02-09-2010, 07:06 PM
Well, I'll join in and admit that I have Asperger's also!

Samuel Dravis
02-10-2010, 12:24 AM
Aspergers is a beautiful experience which only few can be in it, but that doesn't mean they/we are better than you or others.This strikes me as very weird. I don't consider my physical disabilities to be anything other than, well, disabilities. What makes the Asperger experience beautiful?

Ghost
02-10-2010, 12:29 AM
This strikes me as very weird. I don't consider my physical disabilities to be anything other than, well, disabilities. What makes the Asperger experience beautiful?

You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positively

Well, I'll join in and admit that I have Asperger's also!

Welcome to the club! :thmbup1:

Q
02-10-2010, 12:40 AM
You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positively
You seem so sure of that. If you go around expressing this opinion in real life like you have here you're in for a lifetime of misery, because people will stop at nothing to make you look stupid. You've been warned.

Samuel Dravis
02-10-2010, 01:18 AM
You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positivelyI don't intend to dismiss your opinion out of hand, but the "you've got to be it to know it" response doesn't say much to me. The corollary of that would be that you would be unable to evaluate other viewpoints. If that's true then I see no possible justification for saying the autistic experience should be described as beautiful (at least, no more than anyone else's). If intelligence is the sole criterion then many people have the same "beautiful experience" without Asperger's, something I guess you'd contest.

I am still curious if you would mind at least attempting to describe why you would say that having Asperger's is a beautiful experience. It's just this kind of terminology reminds me of a case a while back of a blind couple who thought being blind was the best experience, and proceeded to try to have a blind child (something I consider to be effectively maiming another person).

Ghost
02-10-2010, 01:21 AM
You seem so sure of that. If you go around expressing this opinion in real life like you have here you're in for a lifetime of misery, because people will stop at nothing to make you look stupid. You've been warned.

That's your opinion, not all people are what you say they are, in fact most I find are okay. As the wise man says "Don't judge people before you meet em" . :) So pretty much life is not a down in the dumps as you say it is, life is a wonderful experience, no matter what brings you down

I don't intend to dismiss your opinion out of hand, but the "you've got to be it to know it" response doesn't say much to me. The corollary of that would be that you would be unable to evaluate other viewpoints. If that's true then I see no possible justification for saying the autistic experience should be described as beautiful (at least, no more than anyone else's).

I am still curious if you would mind at least attempting to describe why you would say that having Asperger's is a beautiful experience. It's just this kind of terminology reminds me of a case a while back of a blind couple who thought being blind was the best experience, and proceeded to try to have a blind child (something I consider to be effectively maiming another person).[/QUOTE]

Usually the best things can't be or are hard to describe. Autism is not a stereotype, while it has taken decades for scientists to really explore its characteristics. Being Blind and Being Autistic are different. They affect different parts of your body, so I add up that you guys think that Autism is just another sad disease that makes people crazy, it is not.

Here is why:

Autism does affect the brain, but there are different variations of it as I said in the opening post. High Functioning Autistic People, Aspergers being in this category, usually are very intelligent, have special talent, and they are also have been known to have big heads. Low Functioning Autistic People have symptoms similar to down's syndrome, but are a little higher functioning. They have little to no vocal communication skills, but can communicate with visual signs, some are lucky to have average vocal skills, people say they walk funny, they also are known to have tantrums more often than the normal two-three year old. However, some scientists are beginning to wonder if the lower functioning Autistic people are actually smarter than the higher functioning, but have no way to express it. The show House has one episode focused on Autism

Source: http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/autism-symptoms

Samuel Dravis
02-10-2010, 01:43 AM
I don't think it makes anyone crazy; it's a syndrome that reduces CHA to a greater or lesser degree while (possibly) boosting INT. --Yes, I'm going to burn for that. >_<

There isn't anything wrong with having Asperger's; I was just curious why you thought having a disability was beautiful, because that association strikes me as very, very strange.

Q
02-10-2010, 01:44 AM
That's your opinion, not all people are what you say they are, in fact most I find are okay.
Sure they are; to your face. If I recall correctly, people with Asperger's have a hard time reading body language, putting them at a severe disadvantage when determining another's intent. I think they call it "mind blindness", and it makes people with Asperger's very easy to dupe. I could be mistaken about this particular symptom, however.
As the wise man says "Don't judge people before you meet em" . :)
Whatever. I don't.
So pretty much life is not a down in the dumps as you say it is, life is a wonderful experience, no matter what brings you down
Huh? What are you talking about? You're clearly misunderstanding me, here. I'm not being negative; I'm being realistic.

If you don't believe me, then go ahead and broadcast how "smart" you are. You'll learn eventually that people don't appreciate it and will make a fun game out of proving you wrong.
IMO, autism is overdiagnosed, and has in many ways become the next "fad" disorder. There's a "burden complex" among a lot of parents who think having a "special needs" child makes them oh-so holier than thou. Which only puts more pressure on reasonable doctors to misdiagnose kids in order to make a living. It's all just disgusting.

Of course, the kids who lord their mild autism or aspergers over others like they're superior humans piss me off to no end. People need to stop being so obsessed with being such special little snowflakes.
I agree. When it comes to physiological problems, a diagnosis can be definitively proven or dis-proven. Not so with things psychological, which is why, after 25 years in and out of "treatment", I've come to believe that the "mental health profession" is 10% medicine and 90% fraud.

VarsityPuppet
02-10-2010, 03:13 AM
Generally: What I am disgusted with are how quick we (as a society, parents, schools, peers) are to give pills for this, pills for that--for everything in general.


Yep, the quick-fix pill. It's amazing how many people are obsessed with that sort of thing.


IMO, autism is overdiagnosed, and has in many ways become the next "fad" disorder. There's a "burden complex" among a lot of parents who think having a "special needs" child makes them oh-so holier than thou.


Another common belief of mine

We have to live with the results of someone having adverse side effects that may be worse than the medications we prescribe, so we are cautious about using the correct drug for the correct time and at the correct dose.

I take it from the use of "we", that you're a doctor, Jae? Correct me if I'm mistaken.

Not all doctors likely care as much as you do. I was prescribed a nasal spray to deal with vasomotor rhinitis, which as it turns out, was the addictive/habit-forming kind (Flonase, I believe), though he did insist otherwise. Now, I can't say whether he was scheming to misdiagnose me, or just did so out of ignorance/some other reason, but essentially he prescribed me something I didn't need. Now, I realize seasonal colds are a little different compared to mental disorders, but still. There is malpractice out there.


If you don't believe me, then go ahead and broadcast how "smart" you are. You'll learn eventually that people don't appreciate it and will make a fun game out of proving you wrong.

Seriously. An issue of humility though.


Aspergers being in this category, usually are very intelligent, have special talent, and they are also have been known to have big heads.

I read some prose written by a person with asperger's and they described it as... well "Hell". Can't find the page for the life of me though.

Jae Onasi
02-10-2010, 03:24 AM
You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positively

Whether you mean it this way or not, this comment comes across as incredibly arrogant. You may be in that position now. One thing I've learned in life, however, is that there is always someone who is brighter, better, more talented, wiser, more gifted, more 'X', than I am. It would be unwise to assume that you're always going to be the most intelligent person around. I would recommend the entire book of Proverbs to you, but particularly verses 17:28 and 26:12.

Edit: @VarsityPuppet: Yes, I'm a doctor. And off on a tangent, Flonase is a corticosteroid, and isn't considered addictive. Now, the over-the-counter 'neo-sinephrine' sprays can be 'addictive', in that you get a rebound swelling once the spray wears off about 4-ish hours later, so people get caught in the vicious cycle of swelling, relief, more swelling, needing more of the spray to get relief, more swelling, more spray, etc. It's not technically a true addiction because the rebound swelling does go down after a relatively short time, but people don't like that feeling at all. Since I suffer from vasomotor rhinitis myself (rather annoying condition, if pretty innocuous otherwise), I've found Flonase or Atrovent sprays to be very helpful, Atrovent happens to work better for me. I've used both for years depending on the time of year (only bothers me during allergy season now), and I can go on or off of them at any time, following my allergist's recommendations, with no adverse effects.

Shem
02-10-2010, 04:19 AM
You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positivelyNot necessarily true and this is coming from someone who knows what type of mind you have.

What you have is talents that a lot of people don't have. That part is positive. Here's the negative part. You also have weaknesses that a lot of people don't have and you just exploited it by your comment alone.

What you exploited was your lack of tact in your statements. You came off as arrogant like Jae pointed out. I bet you didn't even think twice you were being that way when you originally said it. In fact, you probably were oblivious to that fact until pointed out just now in a sense if you didn't read Jae's statement first.

Making friends and forming close relationships is actually harder for you than your typical average human being. But at the same time those you have bonded with you really formed really strong bonds with.

You probably offend many without realizing it and I bet there were times you find out later and those moments from time to time have surprised you when you did find out trying to figure out what you did wrong.

If anything, be grateful for your strengths that comes with Asperger's and some humility for them while studying other people in their interactions with each other and learn to blend in without sticking out too much with small things like mannerisms.

There are gifts and curses with Asperger's. That's why it's a considered a disability because it does have its weaknesses. The key is to realize those and work on them as it will take years to get better at those.


Welcome to the club! :thmbup1:
It's a club I've officially known I'm in for the last 9 years. I went 25 years of my life not knowing it. Like a lot of kids these days, they get diagnosed very early in life and have support throughout their childhood. That wasn't me. I grew up without that type of support. And I admit there were times I felt isolated and alone as I realized I was different, but didn't understand it.

You see, I graduated high school in 1994, the year the Asperger's was an official diagnosis. That's why I didn't know it when growing up.

My goal in life is that if you get a chance to know me is that is is hard to see that I have Asperger's. I really want the average person I come across to not notice it. I guess that comes with years of practice of not knowing before the age of 25 doesn't go away easy as I still try to come off as just an ordinary person even though if you meet me in real life, I'm about 6'7" and 275 LBS.

Ghost
02-10-2010, 06:50 PM
Whether you mean it this way or not, this comment comes across as incredibly arrogant. You may be in that position now. One thing I've learned in life, however, is that there is always someone who is brighter, better, more talented, wiser, more gifted, more 'X', than I am. It would be unwise to assume that you're always going to be the most intelligent person around. I would recommend the entire book of Proverbs to you, but particularly verses 17:28 and 26:12.

You're right on the arrogant part, but some things have to be experienced first hand. It's just my opinion, but why the big argument over it?Never did I say or ment that I was the smartest thing around. Sure I was saying I was smarter than I would have been without Aspergers, but that doesn't mean I am the smartest thing in the universe.

I read some prose written by a person with asperger's and they described it as... well "Hell". Can't find the page for the life of me though.

Sometimes Aspergers can be a gift, or a curse. People do tend to make fun of you because of it, and it can lead you in the wrong direction if you let it control you entirely

I was just curious why you thought having a disability was beautiful, because that association strikes me as very, very strange.

Everyone has a different view of it, but it gives you gifts and curses. Nobody ever said it was perfect, but it is a learning experience that's for sure

If I recall correctly, people with Asperger's have a hard time reading body language, putting them at a severe disadvantage when determining another's intent.

Some of that is true, but some also are good at reading people's body language. Say Poker. It's all about reading your opponent. And being smart with your bets.

I think they call it "mind blindness

Source? Few scientists say that, it may impair the brain, but it is not blind, for if it was then no Autistic person could do anything, for even the low-functioning can read signs, write things, and sometimes talk. Doctors do it with them in the recreation centers here in San Diego

If you don't believe me, then go ahead and broadcast how "smart" you are.

I only said that maybe twice that I was smarter, don't have to take it personally that I am just saying what gifts I was given by Aspergers, which helped explain part of what it is.

You'll learn eventually that people don't appreciate it and will make a fun game out of proving you wrong.

Again, I only stated something that was given by Aspergers. Interpret that anyway you want but I will stand my ground on this matter.

You also have weaknesses that a lot of people don't have and you just exploited it by your comment alone.


I may not be that good at debating, but I still can stand my ground. I may have weaknesses that others don't have, but that doesn't stop me from stating my point.

You probably offend many without realizing it and I bet there were times you find out later and those moments from time to time have surprised you when you did find out trying to figure out what you did wrong.

Everybody does that once in a while, because sometimes we do say things that state out point, but do offend others.

If anything, be grateful for your strengths that comes with Asperger's and some humility for them while studying other people in their interactions with each other and learn to blend in without sticking out too much with small things like mannerisms.


Thanks for the advice. I appreciate it, but let me tell you this right now. I have always had trouble blending in, no matter where I go, and somehow in the end I stick out from everybody else. That's something that is a drawback I have, maybe it is part of the Aspergers. So you are correct that everything has a drawback. I do try to work on it, but still I have things to work on.

Astor
02-10-2010, 07:06 PM
Sure I was saying I was smarter than I would have been without Aspergers,

You can't really be sure of that, though, can you? Seeing as it's something you've always had, you've no way of knowing if you really are smarter than you would have been if you were 'normal'.

Web Rider
02-10-2010, 07:18 PM
Not true, while it is more common than other disorders, it is a very low chance that you could have it. Larry King discussed this on CNN.
Yes I think it's clear I don't care what Larry King thinks on anything. I'll take the opinions of my mother, the therapist, my aunt, the psychologist, and my uncle(who has more degrees than either of us).

Source? Autism is more important than you think.
I said "I think", as in: it is my opinion. And "more important" than what? More children in this country have bad vision than autism.

All parents think their child is important, or even more important than others, so Autistic Kid Parents are not much different than normal parents. They have to go through a lot, especially with low-functioning Autism.
As I am aware, but that does not make them better parents. Just as having a hard job does not make you a better worker, nor does chewing overcooked meat make you a better eater.

Only qualified doctors can be truly sure it is Autism, usually psychiatrists.
I'm quite certain that anyone who disagreed with you you would call "unqualified", and you would be equally quick to call those who agreed with you "qualified", but that's just IMO.

Really, because usually Autistic children are either bullied, harassed, or made fun of because they are "weird" to other kids. I've seen this at many schools which hold both Autistic and Normal Kids. So, in fact, they don't Lord it over other people. Aspergers is a beautiful experience which only few can be in it, but that doesn't mean they/we are better than you or others.
Kids are bullied for being white, for being black, for being gay, for being smart, for being stupid, for being girls, for being boys, for wearing certain clothes, for watching certain shows, for eating certain food, or just because somebody has nothing better to do.

And my opinion of you thinking it's a "beautiful experience" can be summed up in: :ugh:


Its not an obsession, it's a serious issue that many have addressed. This debate is over that issue. As Jae said we all have a little abnormality in us.
Which is irrelevent to my point. People are different, they always have been, they always will be. What makes you special is not that you were born with 3 legs, 40 fingers, or a mental condition. What makes you who you are is your accomplishments. The things you do with your life. A condition which was not of your making is not something to be proud of.

There are plenty enough sick people out there that we reasonable docs don't need to intentionally misdiagnose in order to 'make a living'. Secondly, misdiagnosing leads to a. lawsuits and b. loss of license and c. loss of career. Thirdly, intentionally misdiagnosing to gain more revenue is called fraud, and will get us put in jail along with getting slapped with hefty fines, so we don't do that. OK, there are a rare few try to do that, but they get caught eventually.
If there is going to be a misdiagnosis, it's far more likely that it's because the doctor was skipping doing tests in order to see more patients in a day, and thus missing critical signs of disease. There are 2 people in my entire career of working with hundreds of doctors who I would report to the state boards, and both were running patients through the mill and not doing tests they should have been doing. As a result, they didn't diagnose the diseases that were patently obvious to any 2nd year medical student if they'd just taken the time to look properly. I have read a story about cataracts being over-diagnosed by a surgeon in Chicago, so that the surgeon could get the revenue by doing the surgeries, but that guy ended up in jail after getting caught doing that a few years later.
Because certainly, no doctor ever misdiagnosed a kid with ADD because their parents wanted to put their kids on some pills. Yes, doctors certainly never do unethical things because they always get caught. I'm sorry, but your statement is just silly, just plain and simply it's silly. The idea that everyone who breaks a rule or skirts the line is going to get caught and even if they do, get seriously punished is silly.

You'd have to be Autistic to know ;) I've always been smarter than those in my class, mostly because I think it has been my Aspergers syndrome. It is thought to affect a person's intelligence, usually positively
Hmmm, I guess I have aspergers too since I've always been smarter than many of my classmates! :ugh: Maybe it's just me, but I have no intention of either discussing any conditions I may or may not have, or even caring if there are others I don't know about. I want to be defined by my actions, not by the fact that my brain has a different chemical balance than others.

Welcome to the club! :thmbup1:

:ugh: Aspergers is not a special club. This is exactly my problem with kids today, you define yourself by what's wrong with you not by your accomplishments, and even when you accomplish things, it's "in spite of" or "because of" your problem. Come on!

Q
02-10-2010, 08:48 PM
Source? Few scientists say that, it may impair the brain, but it is not blind, for if it was then no Autistic person could do anything, for even the low-functioning can read signs, write things, and sometimes talk. Doctors do it with them in the recreation centers here in San Diego.
This (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind-blindness) is to what I was referring. I was reciting from memory, but it looks like I was correct. Apparently, it says that the opposite of mind-blindness is empathy, of all things. How interesting.
Again, I only stated something that was given by Aspergers. Interpret that anyway you want but I will stand my ground on this matter.
It's not how I interpret your behavior that you need to worry about nearly as much as how those within striking distance will interpret them. If you want to get your ass kicked both physically and psychologically on a regular basis, then be my guest. You need to realize, however, that you're setting yourself up for it for the simple reason that most people won't give a tinker's damn that you have Asperger's. Hell, most people have never even heard of Asperger's, let alone know anything about it. They'll just see you as someone in desperate need of an attitude adjustment, and they'll react accordingly.

Shem
02-10-2010, 09:51 PM
One of the things that I had a hard time understanding growing up was sarcasm. That took a lot of patience to finally understand it. Once I got a better grasp of it, I was introduced to the internet and understanding it there was very difficult for a while and it is a bit still of a small struggle compare to what I did deal with.

Of course symbols like :xp: or ;) were not big when I first started using the internet in 1995. And when people did do little appreciations, I totally overlooked them in a sense where I didn't really see what they were using them for.


It's not how I interpret your behavior that you need to worry about nearly as much as how those within striking distance will interpret them. If you want to get your ass kicked both physically and psychologically on a regular basis, then be my guest. You need to realize, however, that you're setting yourself up for it for the simple reason that most people won't give a tinker's damn that you have Asperger's. Hell, most people have never even heard of Asperger's, let alone know anything about it. They'll just see you as someone in desperate need of an attitude adjustment, and they'll react accordingly.
Couldn't have said it better myself.

@Johnathon-Mk II: Let me remind you of something that I know about you already by seeing your comments. Some of it is Asperger's just because I see some of myself in them and some of it is the attitude you *CHOOSE* to have. I would strongly suggest a bit more humility if I were you, especially since some people will have a hard time understanding you or have the patience to and I believe our personal relationships with our peers is very important in coping in this world.

But you don't have to do anything I suggest. It's your choice. So look at what I'm saying as a strong suggestion and remember that Asperger's is listed as a disability, not something gifted people have.

Ghost
02-10-2010, 10:19 PM
alright, I'll try to remember that. Thanks Shem.

@ Q, you're right on the part that not many people understand autism, so I agree there.

Samnmax221
02-10-2010, 11:13 PM
You're right on the arrogant part, but some things have to be experienced first hand. It's just my opinion, but why the big argument over it?Never did I say or ment that I was the smartest thing around. Sure I was saying I was smarter than I would have been without Aspergers, but that doesn't mean I am the smartest thing in the universe.
You don't have the perspective to make that call. A lack of empathy is one of the effects of autism spectrum disorders.

Jae Onasi
02-11-2010, 01:08 AM
You're right on the arrogant part, but some things have to be experienced first hand. No, some things don't have to be experienced first hand. We can learn just fine from the mistakes and successes others experience.

It's just my opinion, but why the big argument over it?Never did I say or ment that I was the smartest thing around. Sure I was saying I was smarter than I would have been without Aspergers, but that doesn't mean I am the smartest thing in the universe.

a. you don't know if you would have been smarter with or without the Asperger's. Intelligence is controlled by multiple genes and a host of environmental factors.
Why the big argument? First, it's not an argument. It's advice. Second, I prefer people not put themselves into a position where they can be teased or bullied. We're pointing it out here in the hopes that you'll take our advice on arrogance and save yourself some teasing/bullying. If you act like you're intellectually superior in your class or with the people around you, it's not going to go well for you. That's not meant to be an insult, that's meant to be friendly advice. Take it for what you will.
You don't have the perspective to make that call. A lack of empathy is one of the effects of autism spectrum disorders.
I agree on this in general. Not every single person with Asperger's/autism may experience this, but it is certainly a feature of the disorder.

Because certainly, no doctor ever misdiagnosed a kid with ADD because their parents wanted to put their kids on some pills. Yes, doctors certainly never do unethical things because they always get caught. I'm sorry, but your statement is just silly, just plain and simply it's silly. The idea that everyone who breaks a rule or skirts the line is going to get caught and even if they do, get seriously punished is silly.
That's why I qualified my statement by saying no reasonable docs would do that. Are there unethical ones out there? Sure. I don't consider them reasonable docs. Do they get caught eventually? A lot of them do. The guy who was over-diagnosing cataracts got caught because he billed Medicare for a lot more cataract surgeries than his colleagues did. It took awhile to catch him, but not only were the penalties for him very steep (Medicare wanted all of his fees back, plus penalties), but he lost his license permanently, and did jail time for it. That doesn't even begin to touch the civil suits that followed by outraged patients. With so much of billing computerized now, it's very easy to track which docs are using what diagnostic and treatment codes, and track who's billing more of certain procedures than average. Those docs get flagged for investigation and their charts get audited. If the insurance companies find that the doc isn't following accepted standards of care, guess what? The insurance company takes their payment back, along with penalties, and sometimes bounces that doc from their plans. If patients think they're getting over-treated, they report that doc to the state board. The state board investigates. If they find something wrong, that doc can lose his license temporarily or permanently. No reasonable doc is going to risk getting slapped with fraud charges and license revocation.

Ghost
02-11-2010, 01:14 AM
Ugh. You guys are taking my statements way too seriously. A. I don't act superior in class, go ahead and criticize me for just saying that, I said I was smart, but that doesn't mean I was the smartest in my class. b. I've seen kids who act superior in class to others, and they get the **** beaten out of em. I don't say "Hi guys, you all are dumbasses, and I am smarter than you. Hahaha" which is just stupid and something which also says "Kick me please", but that doesn't mean I will act indifferent from the class.

Jae Onasi
02-11-2010, 01:39 AM
Ugh. You guys are taking my statements way too seriously. There's no other way to take it unless you qualify it with a smiley or something that indicates there's some humor or non-seriousness involved.

A. I don't act superior in class, go ahead and criticize me for just saying that, I said I was smart, but that doesn't mean I was the smartest in my class. Actually, in post 45 you did say this:
I've always been smarter than those in my classThis means to me that you do think you're the smartest in your class. It's very hard to read any other intent into that statement than "I'm the smartest in my class". That was why a number of us made the suggestions we did.

b. I've seen kids who act superior in class to others, and they get the **** beaten out of em. I don't say "Hi guys, you all are dumbasses, and I am smarter than you. Hahaha" which is just stupid and something which also says "Kick me please", but that doesn't mean I will act indifferent from the class.
You can be defensive if you want, or you can take our advice, which is meant to help you. It's your choice. Getting mad at people here will do you no good, and could be problematic if your posts fall outside the boundaries of the rules. Keep it civil, please.

Ghost
02-11-2010, 02:04 AM
Okay, you've made your point, I'll take your advice, but i'm too wired to say anything else. Good Night http://th290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/inks_lwc/th_banana.gif

mimartin
02-11-2010, 02:52 PM
Wrote I was going to stay out of this thread, but since volunteer duty has made that impossible I’ll add another ½ cent.

Intelligence will only get someone so far in life, how one relates and deals with others is just as important to happiness as being intelligent. That is what makes my cousin’s condition so difficult to me. She amazes me at times with what she comes up with at her age. However, her inability to easily relate meaningfully with others saddens me as it seems like a lonely experience to me. With patience and stubbornness I have built a friendship with her, but most people are not as hardheaded and stubborn as I am. I think she trust me, because even though she is different, beyond being more patient with her, I have not treated her any differently than her brothers or sisters. She holds a special place in my heart, but she is no more or less import to me than the others.

Still if I had to power to make her more like her brothers and sisters, I would. Not because I think less of her, but because I believe it would make her life easier and happier. Since I don’t have that power, I will just make her life as happy as I possibly can.

Samnmax221
02-11-2010, 04:17 PM
APA officially places aspergers within the autism spectrum. (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123527833) Some Aspies have also started an edit war on wikipedia, because they're mad about being classified, and seemingly have nothing better to do.

Ghost
02-11-2010, 05:08 PM
Anyone can edit Wikipedia, so the information can be off. Still, other information it gives is valuable

Samnmax221
02-11-2010, 06:27 PM
Yes, but crybabies fighting over edits, and being for lack of a better term "Spergmaster Generals" is silly. Also it's important to note that it was the American Psychological Association who reclassified it.

mimartin
02-11-2010, 07:17 PM
Anyone can edit Wikipedia, so the information can be off. Still, other information it gives is valuable

50 changes in the last few days with 1/2 being undo edits sounds like spam to me.

Jae Onasi
02-11-2010, 08:55 PM
I would take the word of the APA over wiki any day.

@mimartin--not that you need my approval or such, but you should be very proud of making a positive difference in her life. :)

VarsityPuppet
02-12-2010, 01:29 AM
Edit: @VarsityPuppet: Yes, I'm a doctor.

Awesome ;)


And off on a tangent, Flonase is a corticosteroid...

oh really? Whoever told me that then must have been mistaken then.. Oh well.

Either way, it's really weird, because I only just developed it recently. :(

I said "I think", as in: it is my opinion. And "more important" than what? More children in this country have bad vision than autism.

Myself being one of them.

Maybe it's just me, but I have no intention of either discussing any conditions I may or may not have, or even caring if there are others I don't know about. I want to be defined by my actions, not by the fact that my brain has a different chemical balance than others.

QFT ^


I don't say "Hi guys, you all are dumbasses, and I am smarter than you. Hahaha" which is just stupid and something which also says "Kick me please", but that doesn't mean I will act indifferent from the class.

In my experience, that's hardly ever the case, after the 6th grade anyways...
Most people will act like they're smarter than everyone, not necessarily broadcasting it to the world via verbal communication.