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View Full Version : Thinking of Using a Gamepad to play Jedi Outcast?...


Lord Nodata
04-09-2002, 05:43 PM
Well, so was I. Here is my definitive reasoning and pros and cons as to whether or not a game pad will suffice for this game...

First off, let me say that the depth of saber attacks in Jedi Outcast almost REQUIRE a tool with a bit more precision in movement then the common keyboard can offer. I know what you're going to say: "No Game pad can beat the precision on my mouse and keyboard!" And to an extent, I agree whole-heartedly with you. HOWEVER, when it comes to diagonal movements for lightsaber attacks, it's infinitely easier to chain several diagonal attacks in a row with a joystick, rather than using 2 keys at once for each diagonal attack on a keyboard, and having to swich between them. So to conclude THAT argument, I would have to say that the ease of hitting my diagonals in succession on a joystick greatly outweighs the ability to hit those same diagonals in succession with the keyboard (remember, the mouse does NOT affect your light saber attacks, other then aim...and I'll get to that later.)

So...I ordered this:

http://ca.store.yahoo.com/merconnet-electronics/pstopccon.html

And played around with it for a bit. Now, keep in mind that I would only DARE consider even using a joypad (in this case my PS2 controller) for this game because of the extra control it gives you over your lightsaber attacks.

Also I noticed this about using a gamepad:
The in-game menu only allows you to adjust the "dead-zone" of your joystick. The "dead-zone" is the size of the neutral area on the joystick. The neutral area is where NO action takes place (ie, you're idling.) So, there isn't an adjustment on the in-game menu to allow you to adjust the "sensitivity" of the game-pad. The sensitivity controls how FAST you turn or look (depending on which axis you adjust it for.) So, the in-game menu does NOT allow you to adjust how quickly your character will turn around using the joystick....

However, don't fear. There's a simple command that you can type into your jk2mpconfig.cfg file (just tack it on the end there) that WILL allow you to adjust the "sensitivity" of the joystick. These commands were taken from the Q3 cvar list, so I'm not 100% sure they work with Jedi Outcast, but they SHOULD. Also, I am unsure as to what the values for the cvar should be, it's all really dependent on what sensitivity "feels" right to you...just like mouse sensitivity. Anyway, here's the commands:

joy_forwardsensitivity "-1" set forward/back sensitivity (negative is inverted)
joy_forwardthreshold "0.15" set forward/back dead zone
joy_name "joystick" set joystick name
joy_pitchsensitivity "1" set pitch sensitivity (negative is inverted)
joy_pitchthreshold "0.15" set pitch dead zone
joy_sidesensitivity "-1" set side sensitivity (negative is inverted)
joy_sidethreshold "0.15" set side dead zone
joy_threshold "0.15" possibly an overall threshold setting all other joy variables removed in 1.08
joy_upsensitivity "-1" set up/down sensitivity (negative is inverted)
joy_upthreshold "0.15" set up/down dead zone
joy_yawsensitivity "-1" set yaw sensitivity (negative is inverted)

Now, with these settings, it becomes infinitely easier (and faster) to turn around with the joystick, thus saving you MANY chops in the back. Also, bear in mind that for First-Person Shooters, a Keyboard and Mouse are ALWAYS going to allow you greater control over your aim, so you should ONLY consider using a joypad for this game if you are going to follow 2 guidelines (IMO):

1. You can play the game well in 3rd person ALL the time. I say play in 3rd person because it's easier to SEE your lightsaber movements in 3rd person. Also, with a joypad, aiming becomes EXTREMELY limited with guns (as compared to keyboard and mouse-style), thus 3rd person view will make it so that you only have to really aim in the general direction of your target. Which leads me to my second point...

2. This style of play (using a game pad) is recommended ONLY for those of you that play the game for the lightsaber aspect. As I've said before, the joypad's greatest advantage comes from that fact that you can get more precise movements (diagonal chaining, moving swipes, etc.) out of the joypad. I do NOT reccomend you using the joypad if you will be picking up and using guns as primary weapons, as the AIM of the pad cannot compare to the AIM with a mouse. However, for lightsabers, directional AIM is NOT as important as WHICH attack you are performing. As far as aim goes, as long as you are facing your opponent, consider your aiming taken care of. The actual swipe/slice that you perform with the light saber is what is going to determine whether or not you break your opponent's defenses.

So to sum it up, there it is. The pro's and con's of the joypad, and even a few tips on how to tweak it once you get it. I'll see you on the battlefield.:yoda:

Lord Nodata
04-11-2002, 05:43 PM
I just found out (the hard way) that Jk2 does NOT have a sensitivity setting for the joystick in the console. (and yet quake 3 does...why take it out?) So basically, you're stuck to the default turn rate. :p

Jedi_WilliamKy
04-11-2002, 05:57 PM
Well that's just great for everyone in Canada.

Anyone got a link to a site that offers this cable to America? I would prefer to order from an American company since I live here.

moore+
04-11-2002, 06:12 PM
Er, I just bound some specific saber attacks I like to my keypad, kinda like that duel.cfg someone made.

Easier than plain KB or gamepad.

Lord Nodata
04-11-2002, 06:31 PM
that canadian company places orders to the US at no additional fee. You even pay in US dollars. Fed-Ex is amazing eh?:D

70-228
04-11-2002, 08:09 PM
How about using a gamepad AND MOUSE? I've been using gamepad and mouse combo for years and the best player I ever saw used a Joystick/mouse combination.

However in this particular game it's very hard. The sheer weight of options; force powers, weapons, different firing modes. Make gamepad use a bit of a struggle. And before people look at me in amazement remember a gamepad is just a few buttons (like a keyboard) just arranged in a comfortable way.