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View Full Version : It's spelle D-U-E-L, not D-U-A-L!!!


-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:03 PM
Duel - A prearranged, formal combat between two persons, usually fought to settle a point of honor.

Dual - Composed of two usually like or complementary parts; double

If you still don't understand, here is a sentence for each!

He pulled out his sword, I pulled out mine, and we proceeded to DUEL!

When Anakin picks up DUAL lightsabers in Attack of the Clones, that was definitely my favorite part.

If you still don't get it, well, you are SOL.

-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:04 PM
it's spelled - spelled not spelle!

Yeah, I caught my typo!

-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:05 PM
And I caught it before any of you could flame me about it!! MWUUAHAHAHAHAH!!!! :D

Abom|nation
05-08-2002, 06:08 PM
I could complain about the fact you forgot your u's in honour and favourite, but I won't.

-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by Abom|nation
I could complain about the fact you forgot your u's in honour and favourite, but I won't.

Good that you didn't complain, b/c I live in America, not England. Here it's spelled H-O-N-O-R and F-A-V-O-R-I-T-E
Kinda like C-O-L-O-R

Abom|nation
05-08-2002, 06:14 PM
Which is the silly way :)

Patton
05-08-2002, 06:21 PM
I won't completely obliterate all of Europe once again with mere words, but I will say this: color and favorite makes much more sense than colour and favourite, from a linguistic standpoint.

-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:22 PM
Oh, of course! :laughing:

I have always wondered why that was different, though.

Kuroshi
05-08-2002, 06:22 PM
I'd like to make a motion to create a new country in which the word 'Duel' shall be spelled 'Dual'.

Leagle
05-08-2002, 06:23 PM
Originally posted by Patton
I won't completely obliterate all of Europe once again with mere words, but I will say this: color and favorite makes much more sense than colour and favourite, from a linguistic standpoint.

Not if you have compulsory french from the age of 7.:(

-=VIB=- Wang
05-08-2002, 06:25 PM
Originally posted by Kuroshi
I'd like to make a motion to create a new country in which the word 'Duel' shall be spelled 'Dual'.

But then you would have sentences like - I used dual lightsabers in my dual!

Or, if you had 2 duels, you would say somehting like - I had dual duals.

Leagle
05-08-2002, 06:28 PM
Originally posted by -=VIB=- Wang

I live in America

Which bit?

You spelt your location wrong, btw. It should be :Some American place. Not : .

Tekken
05-08-2002, 07:23 PM
Originally posted by -=VIB=- Wang


Or, if you had 2 duels, you would say somehting like - I had dual duals.

Dual duals? Jar-Jar, is that you? :D

Actually, a dual dual implies that you had simultaneous duals, as opposed to what you really meant, which was two duals...

EDOX
05-08-2002, 07:31 PM
Originally posted by Kuroshi
I'd like to make a motion to create a new country in which the word 'Duel' shall be spelled 'Dual'.
I Second that motion... :D

Lime-Light
05-08-2002, 08:59 PM
I hereby found the country of Akimbo.

Bambers
05-08-2002, 09:29 PM
Originally posted by Patton
I won't completely obliterate all of Europe once again with mere words, but I will say this: color and favorite makes much more sense than colour and favourite, from a linguistic standpoint.

Actually color makes no languistic sense as its pronounced colour (compare with flour) .. unless americans spell flour as flor. :p :D

I wouldn't mind seeing dual light sabers in jk2 though :)

GreyJedi
05-08-2002, 09:35 PM
Originally posted by Bambers


Actually color makes no languistic sense as its pronounced colour (compare with flour) .. unless americans spell flour as flor. :p :D

I wouldn't mind seeing dual light sabers in jk2 though :)

In America, flour is pronounced with like flower, so your example doesn't quite follow. I do however, wonder how we Americans began spelling differently and speaking differently than the Brits.

Kurgan
05-08-2002, 10:21 PM
In the US it's color, not colour, saber, not sabre, blah blah blah, and its pronounced exactly the same way as far as I can tell, we know! And we drive on a different side of the road than Brits (and the steering wheel is on the opposite side IN the car), and we don't use the meteric system (well, not as much, officially). And the rest of the world plays "football" what we call "soccer" and we have our own version of football that's quite different.

But who cares....

As long as we're complaining, it's "Loser" (as in, "what a sore Loser") not "looser" (as in, my bowels were looser after ingesting the bottle of ex-lax).

And it's "Strong Stance" (or Style), not "Heavy." ; )

Tozier
05-08-2002, 10:28 PM
DUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDU ALDUAl!!!!!!!!!!!!
YAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
DUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUALDUAL!!!!!

Jedi-Bert
05-08-2002, 10:32 PM
actualy in the 70's an act was passed in congress that made the Liter and Gram official standards in the United States, but no one seems to have noticed, were still on imperial measurements for linear values

while we're on spelling, its Through, not Thru

and they're not Donuts, they are Doughnaughts!

if you complain about my capitalization or punctuation (or lack thereof), well, e.e. cummings didnt either =P

Vestril
05-08-2002, 10:34 PM
You know I'm a Canadian who lives in the States, so I kind of change depending on the time of day, but you know what doesn't make sense? The English pronunciation of the word lieutenant--where exactly does THAT come from? (pronounced like leftenant for those who don't know...)

Wacky_Baccy
05-08-2002, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by GreyJedi
I do however, wonder how we Americans began spelling differently and speaking differently than the Brits.

Natural evolution and diversification of methods of communication, dear fellow :p ;)

(I'll write something serious if you're really interested,
but not until later today - it's nearly 2am here :D)


BTW, why do you spell your 'nick the British way? ('Grey') :confused:


[Edit]
Oh God, don't get me started on theorising why we say that word like we do... I hate "leftenant" myself - it seems like an insult to the French... Maybe that's just me :D

I do have a theory, if anyone's interested... :) :D :p

Tozier
05-08-2002, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by Jedi-Bert
and they're not Donuts, they are Doughnaughts!
Oh...... my....... god...........:p

Tozier
05-08-2002, 11:28 PM
Originally posted by Leagle


Which bit?

You spelt your location wrong, btw. It should be :Some American place. Not : .

SpelT? Is that correct in Britain? It's nice to know some brits still speek like Tolkien, though he was South African....

And I always spell it grEy.

dan-o2
05-09-2002, 12:34 AM
Speek? Hah. Pwned.

Tozier
05-09-2002, 12:38 AM
Huh?

dan-o2
05-09-2002, 12:52 AM
It's spelt "Speak."

failsaf3
05-09-2002, 03:37 AM
You know I'm a Canadian who lives in the States, so I kind of change depending on the time of day, but you know what doesn't make sense? The English pronunciation of the word lieutenant--where exactly does THAT come from? (pronounced like leftenant for those who don't know...)
..............you forgot your "eh", eh!

Pedantic
05-09-2002, 03:44 AM
Y'all'd better be careful. Some people don't like it when you spell things correctly.

CM_Third
05-09-2002, 03:48 AM
We should just move to marlark. Everything would be just marlark if me marlarked to marlark. :) .

- Marlark

Vestril
05-09-2002, 04:43 AM
..............you forgot your "eh", eh!

Unfortunately I have a speech impediment that doesn't allow me to say the word **. Thanks for bringing it up, now I'm going to cry...:(

acdcfanbill
05-09-2002, 06:02 AM
so, what do we do with the word Colonel?

Vestril
05-09-2002, 06:24 AM
so, what do we do with the word Colonel?

Another idiotic word pronunciation, except this time the Americans picked it up too.

Demangel
05-09-2002, 08:31 AM
Marklark, I very much Marklarked your marklark tomove to marklark... i would marklark like a marklark, and marklark like a marklark... then we could all be like marklark. And marklark would be much better than the marklark on marklark...


ROFL I LOVED that episode! almost as much as the one where cart gets abducted by aliens and shoots fire out his ass, then denies it just before singing the song about the sun and the tea for two ROFL!!!

-=VIB=- Wang
05-09-2002, 01:43 PM
Originally posted by Tozier


SpelT? Is that correct in Britain? It's nice to know some brits still speek like Tolkien, though he was South African....


Wasn't South Africa controlled by Brittian for a period of time? They used to get slaves from there. Tolkein might have been born there (which I did not know), but I bet you anything that he had a British education.

Jedi-Bert
05-09-2002, 01:52 PM
england didnt get slaves from south africa, im pretty sure that they controled it because of large diamond deposits in the area

slave traders usualy worked along the nothern cost, less of a trip=more money

EDIT: and slaves were not used in england, they were traded to the new world

Groundrunner
05-09-2002, 01:56 PM
I think Americans just forgot how to spell at some point and just decided to spell it like it sounds - like Some hicks in the Virginian Appalachians way back when. Then it just caught on. Now they think they're kings of the world and whatever they do must be right, screw the rest of the world - heck their knowledge of anything outside the States is really low on average.

Imperial measurement itself is a lot less logical than metric. But who cares, listen to some more Britney Spears, drink some more Coke and eat McDonalds.

Pvt_Dancer
05-09-2002, 02:06 PM
Maybe when the colonists came over here to escape the opression they felt they were under in Europe they decided to change their writing system as well to further distance themselves from their stuck up, snobbish roots? ;)

Groundrunner, how can you logically berate Americans for supposedly thinking themselves superior in a post that does nothing but speak to how superior you think you are over them?

I don't care one way or the other, personally. Spell it how you want to.

I personally spell: colour, favourite and sabre and I have never been to England... nor am I an Anglophile. I just do it naturally. Don't ask me why cause I don't have an answer for it.

toolboi
05-09-2002, 03:15 PM
bah, it should all be culer, oner, and favorit any how ;)

Bambers
05-09-2002, 03:41 PM
More like cullour or something cos its not quite an er, its definitely not or but its not really an our either :confused:

Of course theres sulphate / sulfate too :)

Even the imperial measurements vary between the US and UK. In america there are 16 fl oz to a pint compared to 20 in the UK. ie UK pints are 25% bigger, mmm.. beer :D

Imperial measurement itself is a lot less logical than metric

Today, yes because we are used to counting in tens, but in the past 16 and 12 etc were much more useful than 10 because they are more divisible.

-Kztzphl
05-09-2002, 03:48 PM
Originally posted by -=VIB=- Wang
Duel - A prearranged, formal combat between two persons, usually fought to settle a point of honor.

Dual - Composed of two usually like or complementary parts; double

If you still don't understand, here is a sentence for each!

He pulled out his sword, I pulled out mine, and we proceeded to DUEL!

When Anakin picks up DUAL lightsabers in Attack of the Clones, that was definitely my favorite part.

If you still don't get it, well, you are SOL.

Stfuplzkthxbai.
People here comes from all around the world. not their fault if they can't spell correctly. I bet you can't even write Hello in Arab. So shut up.