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-   -   1970 called (http://www.lucasforums.com/showthread.php?t=172545)

stubert 11-12-2006 12:28 AM

1970 called
 
and they want their programming language back =pppp

Dom_152 11-12-2006 06:11 AM

C is a perfectly usable language I don't see why you have such a problem in using it :S

ensiform 11-12-2006 11:59 AM

Cos there are newer, better languages to use. And most are OOP.

Dom_152 11-12-2006 04:11 PM

Yeah I prefer OOP but C is still fine.

razorace 11-12-2006 05:53 PM

I agree.

Tinny 11-13-2006 01:45 AM

Technically I thought C was oop, just without the class support. I like C because of the speed :D.

razorace 11-13-2006 03:04 AM

C is not a object oriented language. C++'s classes impliment OOP.

Dom_152 11-13-2006 10:30 AM

Some people get confused about C beeing OOP because of structures. But you must remember that before the arrival of C++, C structures could only hold data and it wasn't untill C++ came around that support for functions were added.

ensiform 11-13-2006 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tinny
Technically I thought C was oop, just without the class support. I like C because of the speed :D.

C++ is no slower than C; at least not visibly. A couple of nanoseconds maybe but that is very small.

Tinny 11-13-2006 08:39 PM

A couple of nanoseconds per... if its instruction that'd be a lot of time wasted, if its for a bunch of function executions then yeah its hardly noticable.

stubert 11-13-2006 08:45 PM

don't think of c++ being nanoseconds slower, think of it as being several times slower than C

the fact that this is all in nanoseconds is what makes it irrelevant


and yea, C++ is has a very dynamic style to it. I've been reading up on Objective C which looks much more like modern java than anything else but it's very very closely related to C (in fact the Obective C extentions were first part of cc (as opposed to g++))


also, i've been doing alot of work in writting a theorem prover in haskell, and it's pretty leet

http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/Haskell


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