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-   -   The Kavar's Corner Book Club (http://www.lucasforums.com/showthread.php?t=176835)

Jae Onasi 03-22-2007 02:13 AM

The Kavar's Corner Book Club
 
Half-inspired by the European salons of the 18th century and half-inspired by Oprah's book club....

Someone had made a suggestion along these lines the other night about this on the chatbox, and I asked again tonight if anyone would be interested in something like a book-of-the-month club. Several people seemed interested, so I thought I'd bring it to the community. Is there enough interest to do something like this? And if so, what kinds of things would you want in a book club? Literary? Not literary? Best-sellers? Sci-fi/fantasy? Something else?

If there's enough interest, we can go from there. :)

CountVerilucus 03-22-2007 02:22 AM

can't say I'll be that commited to it, but I'll drop by and chat if it's a book ive read. Maybe even read the ones you guys pick.

Pavlos 03-22-2007 01:12 PM

I'd be interested in experiencing other people's views on books I've read and reading books others recommend.

JediMaster12 03-22-2007 01:24 PM

I find it to be interesting and a good idea Jae. Maybe it would inpire others who form their arguments not to rely on Wikipedia too much. I also see it as a means to expand my reading library though I'm sure my mother would say otherwise :D

I say go for it.

Samuel Dravis 03-22-2007 04:00 PM

I read a lot. I think I could handle an extra book a month, just as long as I'm not expected to read romance novels. XD

SilentScope001 03-22-2007 08:28 PM

I am currently reading some Nietchzhe's works (Beyond Good and Evil, Twilight of the Idols, Genology of Morals), though with schoolwork, I don't think I'll handle reading a seperate book. But I'll tune into the disucssions. :)

Fish.Stapler 03-22-2007 08:31 PM

Oh man, I love to read anything and everything in all languages, minus romance novels. I'd love something monthly, it would function as a "Reccommend book, discuss that book for the month, then make a new thread for the next one" right?

Achilles 03-22-2007 09:00 PM

I'd gladly take a look at recommendations, but I don't know if I have the bandwidth to commit to a book club right now. Maybe in a few months when I've finished my masters thesis.

Emperor Devon 03-22-2007 09:12 PM

I'm up to my knees in books about the Russian Revolution right now, but I could fit in another. Seeing a lot of people's insights about one book can be very interesting.

Something academic would be nice - I like it when books offer philosophical/historical knowledge. Unless it's something as good as Dune or LotR, I'd rule out sci-fi or fantasy. Those books don't tend to be very educational.

Jae Onasi 03-23-2007 12:48 AM

You'd be surprised at some of the things that show up in sci-fi/fantasy novels. C J Cherryh has some very interesting stories that are anything but superficial.

Emperor Devon 03-23-2007 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
You'd be surprised at some of the things that show up in sci-fi/fantasy novels.

I know. Dune's a shining example of that.

Most tend not to be very educational IMO. But the ones that are tend to be excellent reads.

Fish.Stapler 03-23-2007 02:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Emperor Devon
I know. Dune's a shining example of that.

Most tend not to be very educational IMO. But the ones that are tend to be excellent reads.

Doesn't need to be educational to be entertaining and thought/discussion provoking. Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow and the sequels are prime examples of this (in the sci-fi genre) ;).

Samuel Dravis 03-23-2007 02:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fish.Stapler
Doesn't need to be educational to be entertaining and thought/discussion provoking. Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow and the sequels are prime examples of this (in the sci-fi genre) ;).

I agree. The problem is everyone's read those already! :D

An interesting book on self-determination is Orson Scott Card's A Planet Called Treason, aka Treason. I got it because I really like his other books, but this one's quite fun by itself and few people are likely to have read it here. I suggest we (well, you guys, I just reread it the other day) read that one! It's not very big, but it's kinda trippy at sections and that makes for great fun - and like I said, the main theme is the importance of self-determination, so it's full of philosophy too! :)

I would not really suggest it for younger readers though. It is teen+ I'm thinking.

Jae Onasi 03-23-2007 03:20 AM

Yeah, we probably ought to make the proviso that we need to keep it in the PG-13 framework, which will probably limit the options some, but there are plenty of great books that meet that criteria.

Of course, this completely rules out any of the bodice-ripper romance novels _I_ read, but, oh, well.

Emperor Devon 03-23-2007 03:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fish.Stapler
Doesn't need to be educational to be entertaining and thought/discussion provoking.

I would consider something that makes you think educational. ;)

And I would suggest Atlas Shrugged for this month's book. I need some time to finish my Russian ones. :D

Bee Hoon 03-23-2007 01:18 PM

Any books that make a good read. I tend towards comtemporary fiction, some fantasy and humourous sci-fi. What's Atlas Shrugged?=p

Pavlos 03-23-2007 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Emperor Devon
I would consider something that makes you think educational. ;)

And I would suggest Atlas Shrugged for this month's book. I need some time to finish my Russian ones. :D

If you can recommend that then I can recommend Hamlet :P. Which, though it isn't a book, is a great work.

igyman 03-23-2007 03:33 PM

I've been thinking of starting a book recommendation thread in Ahto, but I see you're way ahead of me Jae. I'm currently reading the Dark Elf trilogy by R.A. Salvatore and am quite enjoying it, but I'll leave the more detailed commenting for the actual book club thread. :)

Darth InSidious 03-26-2007 07:17 PM

Currently reading the four canonical gospels. I'm on Mark at the moment. Once I've finished the gospels (hopefully before Easter), I intend to move on to Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco.

Samuel Dravis 03-26-2007 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darth InSidious
...I intend to move on to Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco.

Ouch. I bought that book because I thought it would be interesting, but it turned out to be just a way for the author to go "oooh look how obscure this tidbit of history is and how cleverly I fit it into my book's puzzles!" This resulted in that I didn't care about the characters at all at the end of the book. While the story was sometimes interesting, to me it certainly didn't justify the pain of wading through the rest of it. Eco is unlikely to get another chance from me. :p

Jae Onasi 03-27-2007 12:38 AM

Foucault's Pendulum is not nearly as interesting as The Name of the Rose. I was rather disappointed in it.
I like Luke's gospel best. He seemed to understand women better and mention them more, I imagine being a physician had something to do with it.


Well, how about book suggestions then? Shakespeare plays, poetry collections (e.g. Poe or Keats or the Brownings), books (including just plain enjoyable books, no seriousness totally necessary), the Great Books list, all are fair game.

Only stipulation is that it can't be rated M/adult, or porn, or anything out of lines with forum rules. It also has to be something someone can reasonably find in a library or bookstore. And it has to be something we can all read within a month with the assumption that we all have lives, so 1000 page tomes are not the best choice. :D

Emperor Devon 03-27-2007 12:49 AM

When are we getting onto the book of the month? :p

Darth InSidious 03-27-2007 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
Foucault's Pendulum is not nearly as interesting as The Name of the Rose. I was rather disappointed in it.
I like Luke's gospel best. He seemed to understand women better and mention them more, I imagine being a physician had something to do with it.

Possibly. Personally, I prefer Mark. I think Jesus' humanity is much easier to see, and the frustration and difficulty of life for Him...
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
Well, how about book suggestions then? Shakespeare plays, poetry collections (e.g. Poe or Keats or the Brownings), books (including just plain enjoyable books, no seriousness totally necessary), the Great Books list, all are fair game.

Only stipulation is that it can't be rated M/adult, or porn, or anything out of lines with forum rules. It also has to be something someone can reasonably find in a library or bookstore. And it has to be something we can all read within a month with the assumption that we all have lives, so 1000 page tomes are not the best choice. :D

Ethel The Aadvark Goes Quantity Surveying?
:xp:

I'd recommend anything by Wodehouse. He's undoubtedly one of, if not the best writer of the 20th Century, IMO...

Pavlos 03-27-2007 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
so 1000 page tomes are not the best choice. :D

Damn...


Quote:

Originally Posted by Darth InSidious
I'd recommend anything by Wodehouse. He's undoubtedly one of, if not the best writer of the 20th Century, IMO...

I disagree. While I think Wodehouse was a talented writer... I believe George Orwell has the one up on him.

JediMaster12 03-27-2007 01:16 PM

I have had a chance to read a personal favorite of mine called To Kill A Mockingbird. I find it to be a sad little truth about the deep South. Set in the Depression era, the narrator of the story is little Jean Louis 'Scout' Finch who speaks of the strong racism and the circumstances of the people within the town Maycomb. A nice insight into the injustices of society revealing the good, the bad and the ugly. A good read if you like the symbolism.

Another good set that I like is historic fiction and this is one that will send me runnignto the nearest couch to read it. The North and South trilogy by John Jakes is one of the best I have seen in historic fiction. The trilogy carries on about two familes from different parts of the country, one from the idustries of Pennyslvania and the other from the rice plantations of South Carolina. Set in the decade before the Civil War, it passes through the tensions leading up to seccession, war and Reconstruction. Love, pain, hatred are put at its extremes as two familes struggle to keep a lasting friendship and eventually into one family. Again if you like histroic fiction, this is a good series.

Darth InSidious 03-27-2007 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pavlos
I disagree. While I think Wodehouse was a talented writer... I believe George Orwell has the one up on him.

Orwell is undoubtedly a great storyteller, a great intelligence, and a talented writer, but his use of language is simply not in the same league as Wodehouse - the use of metaphor, simile, and other parabole is where Wodehouse reigns supreme, and reigns alone, IMO.

igyman 03-27-2007 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
It also has to be something someone can reasonably find in a library or bookstore.

Keep in mind Jae that not all of us live in the US. You can't possibly expect of me to know what of the things I've read can be found in your local library. ;)

:D I know. I meant to suggest that people pick out books that are fairly well known, not obscure titles. --Jae

Anyway, I have just finished reading R.A. Salvatore's Dark Elf Trilogy and have started reading the first book of the Icewind Dale trilogy. For those that didn't already guess, the genre of the books is fantasy, now, the Dark Elf Trilogy consists of three (:D) books - Homeland, Exile and Sojourn. The main character is a non-typical Dark Elf called Drizzt Do'Urden, who's fighting against the ideals widely accepted by the rest of his people. The books tell of an inner conflict within Drizzt and also of his attempts to find a place where he would be accepted for who he really is, a place he could truly call home. I found these three books a very exciting, interesting and enjoyable read and would recommend that everyone else who decides to read them and likes them also continue with the Icewind Dale trilogy as I have, because the Dark Elf trilogy is not the end of Drizzt's story, it's only the beginning.

Achilles 03-27-2007 03:00 PM

Here's one of the books I'm currently in the middle of reading:
Beyond Oil: The View from Hubbert's Peak
It can be purchased online, so no worries about availability. It's definitely not at risk of violating any PG-13 restrictions. Also, it has an international audience :)

Fish.Stapler 03-27-2007 04:42 PM

Devon, I've read Atlas Shrugged, and I have to say...Ayn Rand is undoubtedly the worst writer of the 20th century. Good idea for a story, absoloutely terrible execution and story-telling. I have all her other books but I'm pretty sure I'd rather remove my eyes with a sharp instrument than read another one of her books.

I'm ready to start with whatever you guys reccommend, I'm currently reading The Fall of Constantinope, very interesting but it's in Greek which I imagine the majority of forumites don't understand. I'm going to put it aside as soon as we get a (decent/non Ayn Rand) reccommendation for the book.

Aurora Starfire 03-27-2007 05:27 PM

Hey guys! I had a couple of thoughts, since I started a summer book club, which is now in its fourth or fifth year. The way we choose books is we send out to everyone interested a list of books to choose from, and then the interested parties return to us their top 10 or so books that they'd like to read, and then I compile a list of the books with the most votes, that we'll read this summer. We usually end up with quite a variety of selections, from science fiction to biographies.

Perhaps something like this could work here, as well? Now, since it's over the summer, we do it weekly, or bi-weekly, but here we could vote for the top twelve books for the year, and assign one to each month.

mur'phon 03-28-2007 05:41 AM

sugestions
 
Great idea, but I'm not sure I can get the books where I live.
My sugestions for books are: Animal farm, the corporation and 1984.

Bee Hoon 03-28-2007 10:32 AM

@JM12 To Kill A Mockingbird is a great book: definitely on my list of favourites. Read it a couple of years back. It really is thought-provoking, in an oblique sort of way=p

@igyman, I read that ages ago! It was pretty enjoyable... Not often do you see a drow behaving like his lighter brethren.

The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy is a riveting read... It deals with many things. A pair of twins that were separated since they were children, the story of their parents, especially that of their mother... I can't do it justice. Just read it;)

JediMaster12 03-28-2007 02:04 PM

@ mur'phon: Animal Farm is a great book that I read in ninth grade and I love Orwell's take on using the animals to reiterate the rise of Stalin, that kind of thing. My favorite of Orwell's is 1984. I often use it to refer to the Patriot Act enacted here in the state with the whole Big Brother is Watching You. My favorite line is when Winston writes 'Freedom is the ability to say that two plus two equals fives. If that is granted then all else follows.'

Another good classic that ties in with the themes exhibited by 1984 and Animal Farm is The Handmaiden's Tale by Margaret Atwood. This is a tale that actually uses the Christian evangelical form as a means of imprisonment. It is told through the eyes of one woman who lives in this Christian community that forbids reading and is ranked by their usefulness. No offense to the Christian peoples there but this is one strange tale but probably not improbable.

Jae Onasi 03-28-2007 03:08 PM

In no particular order.....I'm looking through www.greatbooks.org for inspiration, and am looking at the list and saying "oh, yeah, read that one and liked it...."
Dante's Inferno
The Prince
The Art of War
Jane Eyre
Anything by Poe
Any poetry by the Brownings, Keats, Shelley, other Romanticists
Much Ado About Nothing and Julius Ceasar (or other Shakespeare)
The Social Contract (Rousseau)
Letter from Birmingham Jail (King)
The American Constitution
Canterbury Tales
The City of God (St. Augustine)
Pilgrim's Progress
The Republic (Plato)
Dracula
The Color Purple
Cuckoo's Egg (Cherryh)
Sherlock Holmes
Murder on the Orient Express (or a Miss Marple story)

Just for fun
The Dragonriders of Pern series
Those Who Hunt the Night
The Stainless Steel Rat
The Cat Who...

There's a start of a list, anyway. :)

Pavlos 03-28-2007 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
The Color Purple

Is it possible to like that book? It is good but (maybe because I'm a man...) I can't bring myself to like it. I'm not sure if I'm making sense here.

JediMaster12 03-28-2007 04:08 PM

There are some things that I don't like but I read it because it is for the class and is used as an example of certain themes. I didn't particularly like Their Eyes Were Watching God but I found it interesting and Zora Neal Hurston is a talented writer.

Emperor Devon 03-28-2007 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fish.Stapler
Devon, I've read Atlas Shrugged, and I have to say...Ayn Rand is undoubtedly the worst writer of the 20th century. Good idea for a story, absoloutely terrible execution and story-telling.

Personal taste I guess. I found Ayn Rand's writing style and the philosophies she presented to be very interesting and very different from what I usually read. Not at all like Marx.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jae Onasi
{a list}

Nice ideas. Some of those Id really like to read but haven't yet gotten around to.

I say we stay away from Dracula and most of the poetry, tho. Doesn't quite fit with the topics usually discussed at Kavar's Corner.

Jae Onasi 03-29-2007 03:55 AM

I disagree--the Romantic poets and Dracula reflect a lot about the culture of the time. You can determine what they consider important enough to mention, how social conventions went, what they were trying to say to the reader, etc.

Dracula would make a great Halloween-time read. There's so much vampire lore in our culture that come directly from this book.

Emperor Devon 03-29-2007 04:40 AM

Kavar's Corner is forum for mainly current issues. Not quite the topics present in those. And in any case you'll get more of an education reading a book that directly talks about a culture rather than indirectly, IMO.

igyman 03-29-2007 04:43 AM

For those who like a good action SF, I recommend Prey by Michael Crichton. The book is written in a way that while you read it you can picture every scene in your head, like watching a great movie.


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