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Old 10-13-2008, 11:33 AM   #8
mimartin
TOR ate my KotOR
 
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Do they deserve it?
To quote one of my favorite my favorite Clint Eastwood movie
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Originally Posted by William Munny
Deserve's got nothing to do with it.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Unlike earthquakes, hurricanes strike annually, and with global weather changes, they have been more frequent and more powerful.
Yet, unlike earthquakes, those that live along the coast usually have advance notice.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Yet people continue to live in hurricane prone areas, and more people move there every year. And every year, billions of dollars are accumulated in damages due to these hurricanes.
Yet, ask yourself why people are moving along the gulf coast. Hint: Tourism, Chemical Plants, Seafood, Shipping, Petroleum… That is where the jobs are.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
And after a while, primitive humans learned not to live in storm prone areas.
I thought primitive man was more concerned with their next meal instead of storm patterns. Native American tribes such as the Atakapas and Karankawa lived in the Galveston and Brazoria County area of Texas. I would think the abundance of food was the reason native American lived along the coast.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Yet we have tens of millions of people living, on purpose, will full knowledge, in an area assured to sustain serious damage on an annual basis.
Carla (1961), Alicia (1983) and Ike (2008), are the three substantial storms that have hit this area over the past 50 years. Sure, there have been a few other minor storms that have hit the area, but these are the only one that caused substantial property damage and loss of life. If the frequency was annually, I actually believe the damage and loss of life would be less, as people would not be allowed to be so complacent with their respect for a storm.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Many of them even refuse to leave their homes when the storms are coming, resulting in death and injury that your tax dollars will end up covering, either in the form of FEMA or government loans to insurance companies to keep them from collapsing, especially now under economically stressed times.
I believe this isn’t a problem with people living along the coast. This is a problem with the attitude in American where EVERYONE wants something for nothing. I have insurance and my insurance company has reinsurance so that they know before the disaster how much they are going to have to payout. Requires neither government involvement nor our tax dollars. I evacuated my parents and myself and did not ask FEMA to reimburse me for either. However, many people around her have applied with FEMA to be reimbursed for everything.

There was a rumor that FEMA would pay up to $850.00 for generators so many went out and purchased one. Now if you want a used generator you can get one cheap at Lowes as people have returned them due to the rumor not being true. I purchased one, not because of the rumor, but because I needed one. I did not ask to be reimbursed by FEMA, even though they would have because of my parent’s health and my business.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
The average person cannot afford to rebuild their home every decade.
They can if they are responsible and purchase insurance from a reputable insurance company. You can find out if the company is reputable by visiting your state department of insurance websites as it should have financial and reinsurance information of all state licensed companies on their website.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
They knew what they were getting into, and on the chance they were born there, they know full well what goes on there if they have grown up to an age where they can move out/get a job somewhere else.
I’ve grown up within 45 minutes of where I live now. I’ve lived here my entire life and I usually do not evacuate unless it is a big storm. You can build homes to survive wind. The problem is not wind, the problem is storm surge and as such I do agree with you for people living on the coastal side of the Intracoastal Water Way. However, I do not agree with the blanket statement for people living further inland. Not saying I’m safe from storm surge just because I live 15 miles inland, I am saying it has not happen before even during the last Category 5 storm Carla in 1961. I have flood insurance in case it does happen and I leave during bigger storms (category 2 or above).
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Yet, in economically hard times, this may not be possible, but by the same coin, in economically hard times, we cannot simply have the government dropping a few hundred billion to fix the homes and lives of people who knew full well this could happen to them.
I agree, just I believe it has to do with personal responsibility and has nothing to do with where I live. Let’s take away the coastal jobs (many of which are recession proof) and lets see what happens to not only the U.S. economy, but the world economy. People don’t live on the Texas Gulf Coast for the beauty, it is the jobs. Not just industrial, but farming cotton, rice and soybean. There is also a lot of ranching in the coastal countries.

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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Should people who live in these areas be redlined by their insurance agencies to allow them to recoup costs, regardless of if the insuree's home was ever damaged by a hurricane at all?
Yes, as it illegal to insure one home for a weather related claim and not insurer the neighboring home because it had a weather related claim. However, insurance companies can refuse coverage in Texas, if the home does not meet the State Department of insurance wind codes on the building or the roof on any new construction or repairs done after 1988. The code does work as the homes and business here are in better shape than those 45 miles inland that are under a different code. These codes have nothing to do with storm surge. The insurance commissioner is talking about increase the area along the coast that must comply with the stricter code. Which I wholeheartedly support even though it does increase the cost of construction, it decreases the damage caused by wind.

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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Should we as a nation provide incentives to move people away from these places?
To where? See Achilles reply.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
On a personal note, you have to wonder how stupid some of these people are when they're more scared of an earthquake that happens once in a hundred years to the annual onslaught of hurricanes.
Thanks

I have a warning for a hurricane and it is far from annual. Three times in 47 years or twice in my lifetime is not what I consider an annual event. I have a respect for the power of Hurricanes. Yet, I know I have time to get away before it makes landfall.

Last edited by mimartin; 10-13-2008 at 12:49 PM. Reason: spelling
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