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Old 10-13-2008, 02:40 PM   #13
mimartin
TOR ate my KotOR
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Define "advance". Hurricane warnings are, at best, 5 days in advance, often less due to hurricanes suddenly changing course upon striking warmer or less salted waters along the Gulf and it's coast.
I’d define advance as knowing that a Hurricane can happen anytime during Hurricane season. Moreover, 24 to 48 hours is more than enough time to get people out of the areas prone to storm surge. The problem is costal communities are trying to evacuate the entire population along the entire coast when they should only be worried about the storm surge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Such jobs, with the exception of shipping and seafood, can be found from Texas to Alaska.
No worries about over fishing an area?
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
And I think you'll agree that having a chemical plant in an area known to sustain heavy damage doesn't look like a very good idea.
No, I don’t because I understand why they are here. Climate and the abundance of water is the reason those planets were built here. Like I said you can build for the wind, the worry is storm surge.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Many of these tribal people had lands that stretched well inland and they were not tied to massive homes or buildings that they needed for survival.
Yet some still lived on an Island and along the coast.
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Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
Except for Andrew($40.7 & 65), Katrina(81.2 & 1800+), Wilma($29.1 & 63), Ivan, Gustav, Charlie, and Agnes, all of which cost more than 15billion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...tic_hurricanes
I may not have been clear. I agree with you people should not live within the typical storm surge areas, but you seemed to be saying we should not be allowed to live along the coast which I disagree with. Again, you can build for wind, but not the storm surge. Also a storm does not end once it is a shore, so how far do you want to move people inland? Oklahoma, Kansas or Illinois?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
It's impossible to know how much a disaster will cost before it happens. Work is STILL going on to repair damage done by Katrina, which means costs are still going up.
Yes, you are correct there is no way to predict how much the total storm is going to cost. How much it is going to cost the individual or how much it is going to cost an individual insurance company is very easy to predict. It is because of set deductibles on personal insurance and reinsurances by insurance companies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
That hardly stopped many insurance companies for saying that "mold damage" caused by the water voided the insurance, or some other petty excuse that allowed them to not provide proper payouts to people who needed them. Combined with sitting on their hands to hope people would go away or devaluing a house based on the damage to the point where the company wouldn't pay enough or what was covered to rebuild it.
Since mold was excluded from the original policy, I hardly see how this is relevant. The courts originally ruled it was and the insurance companies paid claims for mold until the Texas Supreme Court overturned the lower courts ruling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
I agree that there is some limit to which the effect of your average hurricane is reduced to the point where you're not really getting hit with the devastating part of the hurricane.
The devastating part of the hurricane is the storm surge. If people built and kept their homes at the state and Federal Flood Management codes even this damage could be minimized. People build house 18 to 20 feet of the ground to code, but then build a room without breakaway walls below it (not to code). Then they wonder why their home disappeared. Lets also remember most of these beach homes are weekend homes or rentals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Rider View Post
IOn the same coin, Florida is often one big retirement community, many people have jobs, but they don't need them and only take them to get out of the house. Elderly are often the most vulnerable to the effects of bad weather, yet many of them express the same "ZOMG EARTHQUAKE!!" fear when the topic of moving to someplace like California comes up.
So you want to keep the elderly off the coast? I’m all for that because it would mean my parents would have to move further away than 15 minutes away.
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