View Single Post
Old 04-01-2009, 01:58 PM   #18
Ray Jones
[armleglegarmhead]
 
Ray Jones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: digital
Posts: 8,255
10 year veteran! LF Jester Helpful! Forum Veteran 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarfieldJL View Post
There is evidence to suggest the big bang did occur.
But I didn't say it didn't occur?


Quote:
You both have it wrong, mass and energy can be swapped with each other.

E=mc^2

However, there are some things where the laws of physics tend to break down, such as a quantum singularity.
But I didn't say it couldn't be swapped?


Quote:
How about Dark Matter and Dark Energy, I couldn't show you either of those in real life yet both are argued by scientists to exist. Just because you can't see something or readily observe something does not mean it doesn't exist.
Huh?


"Composite image of the Bullet cluster shows distribution of ordinary matter, inferred from X-ray emissions, in red and total mass, inferred from gravitational lensing, in blue."


Quote:
The first person to provide evidence and infer the existence of a phenomenon that has come to be called "dark matter" was Swiss astrophysicist Fritz Zwicky, of the California Institute of Technology in 1933. He applied the virial theorem to the Coma cluster of galaxies and obtained evidence of unseen mass. Zwicky estimated the cluster's total mass based on the motions of galaxies near its edge. When he compared this mass estimate to one based on the number of galaxies and total brightness of the cluster, he found that there was about 400 times more mass than expected. The gravity of the visible galaxies in the cluster would be far too small for such fast orbits, so something extra was required. This is known as the "missing mass problem". Based on these conclusions, Zwicky inferred that there must be some non-visible form of matter which would provide enough of the mass and gravity to hold the cluster together.
[...]
Eventually other astronomers began to corroborate her work and it soon became well-established that most galaxies were in fact dominated by "dark matter"; exceptions appeared to be galaxies with mass-to-light ratios close to that of stars. Subsequent to this, numerous observations have been made that do indicate the presence of dark matter in various parts of the cosmos. Together with Rubin's findings for spiral galaxies and Zwicky's work on galaxy clusters, the observational evidence for dark matter has been collecting over the decades to the point that today most astrophysicists accept its existence. As a unifying concept, dark matter is one of the dominant features considered in the analysis of structures on the order of galactic scale and larger.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_ma...ional_evidence


Ray Jones is offline   you may: quote & reply,