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Old 12-27-2005, 10:17 PM   #121
El Virus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
You know, I've never talked about afterlife with anybody who believes in it. Perhaps I'd like to listen to their thoughts on the subject. Though, I suspect, it would be hard to find actual believers here, around me; besides, that would be a great risk of running into some fanatics, whom I'm not particularly fond of.
I think that that is because most of the people who believe in the afterlife see the subject of Death as a taboo, and shoo you away from talking about it with them; that has happened to me, at least.

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Humans think too much, that's their problem.
I agree; but that trait is what separates the Man from the animals, and what has helped us to become what we are today (whether this is good or bad, I leave it up to you).

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As for Life, or Fate, or whatever, you may call it as you like - why would I blame it? In my view, it's always right, especially when you think about it a bit, impartially. There's a reason for everything, and all that... Or, more likely, it all comes down to a scapegoat's question in the end. Whether you blame 'Life', or 'Fate', or find somebody much much closer and more substential to curse for your insignificant petty misfortunes.
I wasn't talking about YOU in particular :P.

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I remember myself crying rivers at a tender age of four, when I played with my toys all the time, that there would come a time when I wouldn't need toys any more. To my mind, it's just that - an excessive distress, nothing more
The same happened to me; I would play with my imagination constantly, I would always pretend I was somebody else; unfortunately, I realised one day, that I would mature and I wouldnd't be morally alowed to play with it again.

My [seldom] friends (or people I waste my time with during the school year) mock at me for my desire to grow up, and they tend to claim that I had no childhood. But deep inside me, I miss those days in which one would just play, without giving a damn about anything else (I wouldn't like to be a child again, however).

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But, well, it only means I don't live really happily, which is the main porpose of the life, in my opinion, - if I worry about 'serious matters'. A happy person (or busy, for that matter) wouldn't have the time for it.
Not to get into the quasi-philosophical topics wen are discussing at another thread; but I dno't really thing life has a purpose. And even if it did, I doubt it would be happiness; being happy involves stability, which may become monotonous after a while.
I think sadness is underrated, without it, the concept of 'happiness' wouldn't exist.
I like a dose of both every once in a while, but I see to be getting more of sadness lately.

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What do you mean - you mean you don't enjoy your life? And a phase of what, exactly, it is, in your opinion? You know, your 'a phase' remark sounds like Nicolas Flamel's from Harry Potter 'death is just another adventure'. What's in adventure if you can't savour it, if you'd ask me. Cheer up, senor Flores, you sound more and more like Membrillo to my ears right now.
On certain days, I don't enjoy my life at all; on others I'm comfortable with it. And I hate myself for that.

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(Seems I can't stop the demands for clarifying). Whose suffering, presciesly?
I am afraid of the death of people I care for; about losing them.
What I meant with suffering was not having a sad experience; but a painful one. You know sever illnesses and stuff (I used to have a small case of hypocondriasis, when I was younger).

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And I certainly enjoy my life. As some clever man said once, you could *not* have even that.
Really, whom?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yohein
By the way, some phrases in the Spanish translation are bad because they are bad written in the original version. For example, when Manny talks with Maximino and he says he saw Olivia kissing Nick, Maximino says that's normal there and Manny says "I mean KISSING, Max"... but if you see, the sentence is written "I mean KISSING Max"... so, of course, in the Spanish version looks like Olivia was kissing Max
Yes, I have noticed that. But I was talking about other things; I'll expand later.
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Old 12-28-2005, 12:23 AM   #122
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I've never tried to ask about afterlife any strangers; and my acquaintances, as I said above, are mostly very materialistic persons.
However, once I new a man who sincerely believed in God and that he himself had seen an angel. I'd already known him for several years (and I had thought I knew him well enough!) before he told me about his experience with supernatural beings, and, you know, while I was listening to him I believed in what he was saying, too. There was some special mesmerism about him. But after I was released from his 'spell', everything he had said seemed utterly ridiculous.
Khm, this was just a memory.


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I wasn't talking about YOU in particular
This knowledge doesn't prevent me from answering about myself, though. After all, that's somebody I know best.

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I realised one day, that I would mature and I wouldnd't be morally alowed to play with it again.
My [seldom] friends (or people I waste my time with during the school year) mock at me for my desire to grow up, and they tend to claim that I had no childhood. But deep inside me, I miss those days in which one would just play, without giving a damn about anything else <...>.
Yes, not giving a damn and not being required to give a damn is bliss.
Do you really want to grow up, and do you count yourself mature? I suppose you have a good reason for that. I, on my part, don't want to grow up at all, never. And, so far, I haven't, however I'm afraid this might not last long (but I surely have a chance, just look at my father: fifty-six or so years old and not much more mature than me; much more intelligent and clever, though, of course). I still pretend most of the time (a habit), and I don't feel any 'moral allowances' bounding me. But I'm a bad example.
Why do those aquaintances of yours claim you had no childhood?

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Being happy involves stability, which may become monotonous after a while.
I think sadness is underrated, without it, the concept of 'happiness' wouldn't exist.
Oh, indeed. I suppose I really did mean 'stability', which you have doubts about. Allah knows, I yearn for stabilty.
Besides, 'happy life's' concept, for me, involves mostly being as much content with it's course as possible; with failures, but always something to look forward to. And good warm people around, of course. And some sort of inner harmony. Sadness will always find a way, anyway, I don't need any additional.

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I like a dose of both every once in a while, but I see to be getting more of sadness lately.
Hm. Same for me - was recently, at least.
Well, the more 'sadness' you get, the more you value little simple pleasures and comfort.

-----------------------
That line about you hating yourself for 'that' - does 'that' refer to 'being comfortable with' your life?

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I am afraid of the death of people I care for; about losing them.
What I meant with suffering was not having a sad experience; but a painful one.
That's good for you - worrying about people you care for, I mean. I don't think I really care about anybody but myself, as crude as that sounds.

Pain's my foremost earthly fear, so to speak, but pain is a chance, and death is a certainty. Some upper level of dread, as well.

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Really, whom?
...Er, I'm not sure. It's a very common aphorism, 'don't complain of your life, you could *not* have even that'. Some comedian created it, or so I've heard.

===================
Now, my translation of GF was hideous, as I've mentioned not once before, but translating GF must be a tough task to accomplish even for the professionals, due to the excess of puns and special terms in the game.
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Old 12-28-2005, 03:50 AM   #123
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Wow, this conversation sure had turned deep. I have no idea what to contribute without interrupting you.

I think I'll start by admitting that Charie may have been right all along. Now that I really think about it (and everybody's examples helped a lot) it sounds absurd that being a Reaper is the only way for a soul to work off his/her time. I still think it's one of the worst, if not the worst, job offered, but definitely not the only one. So you all got me there.

About afterlife, does anyone believe in reincarnation? I'm positive that I was once a dog, no matter how utterly ridiculous it may sound. Laugh if you want, I don't mind. I think reincarnation is a very soothing option. If this life is a disappointment you may do better in the next. Of course, if one is one of those people who want to believe in eternal rest it may seem like hell instead.

However, what I don't like in the idea of reincarnation is that eventually you join the world spirit and become one with everyone else. Loosing one's individuality sounds awful.

Out of interest, do either of you believe in any sort of god or higher being?


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

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Last edited by VampireNaomi; 12-28-2005 at 09:31 AM.
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Old 12-28-2005, 05:16 AM   #124
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Quote:
I think I'll start by admitting that Charie may have been right all along.
Oh, the balsam on my heart .

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About afterlife, does anyone believe in reincarnation? I'm positive that I was once a dog, no matter how utterly ridiculous it may sound. Laugh if you want, I don't mind.
I certainly won't laugh, if you mean this seriously - and you seem to. Why do you think you were a dog? And what kind of a dog: a slad dog, or a house-pet, or a hound, or a stray one? That's important.
I neither believe nor disbelieve in reincarnation, I just like the idea. It sounds interesting. If I had some previous life, I guess it would have been only once, a long time ago, and I wouldn't have been any sentient creature. A pebble fallen in lava.

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However, what I don't like in the idea of reincarnation is that eventually you join the world spirit and become one with everyone else. Loosing one's individuality sounds awful.
Is there such an idea, indeed? I think there are different concepts of reincarnation. Besides, 'loosing one's individuality' somehow contradicts the main idea, don't you think? There still must be left something of you, like a core, a basement of a soul, for reincarnation to posess some meaning. Loosing one's individual memories is different, however that is also arguable. Everything is arguable - and sort of impossible to prove - when it concerns Gods, reincarnations and other creations of idle human mind.

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Out of interest, do either of you believe in any sort of god or heigher being?
What about you?
I believe in Allah. Don't have much choice here, figuratively speaking; plus, 'people believe what they want to believe', Nick got it quite right.

Last edited by Charie; 12-28-2005 at 05:37 AM.
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Old 12-28-2005, 05:52 AM   #125
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Why do you think you were a dog? And what kind of a dog: a slad dog, or a house-pet, or a hound, or a stray one? That's important.
I have no idea. It's just a feeling that I've had ever since I was a child. And I don't know what kind of dog I might have been either. Just a silly hunch that won't go away.

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Is there such an idea, indeed?
In Hinduism at least, I think. The idea is that once you've lived a life good enough you can break free from the chain of being born again and again and become part of the world spirit which is what all souls crave for. Individuality is nothing but an illusion and in reality we're all part of a greater being instead of our own person.

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I think there are different concepts of reincarnation.
Most likely. However, I only know the one I mentioned earlier.

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What about you?
I do believe in something, but I'm not quite sure what. I call myself Christian, but I don't think I'm a true one. I'm sure there is God, in some form at least.

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I believe in Allah. Don't have much choice here, figuratively speaking; plus, 'people believe what they want to believe', Nick got it quite right.
Really? Why do you think you have no choice? Family pressures or something else? You're the first person who I've met who believes in Allah, online or real life. Then again, I don't really see a difference between Him and the God Christians and Jews believe in.

EDIT: El Virus, the delete option should be the first thing you see when you try to edit a message. If that still doesn't work for you, I can delete the double post, if you want.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

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Old 12-28-2005, 07:52 AM   #126
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First let me apologize for the typos on my previous post; I was writing fast and didn't take the time to check it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
Yes, not giving a damn and not being required to give a damn is bliss.
Do you really want to grow up, and do you count yourself mature? I suppose you have a good reason for that. I, on my part, don't want to grow up at all, never. And, so far, I haven't, however I'm afraid this might not last long (but I surely have a chance, just look at my father: fifty-six or so years old and not much more mature than me; much more intelligent and clever, though, of course). I still pretend most of the time (a habit), and I don't feel any 'moral allowances' bounding me. But I'm a bad example.
Why do those acquaintances of yours claim you had no childhood?
That has been the thing with me; all I ever cared for was being old enough to do whatever I wanted (not that it is a strange thing; it is quite common, I think); and I lost my chances to enjoy some situations.

I still adore imagining too, and it is why I practically never get bored, but it's not the same now.

My friends mock at me for my pessimism and apparent dislike towards childhood; mainly because they would like to be kids again, while I wouldn't. But we mock at each other for many things, and they see me as the pessimist of the bunch.

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Oh, indeed. I suppose I really did mean 'stability', which you have doubts about. Allah knows, I yearn for stabilty.
Besides, 'happy life's' concept, for me, involves mostly being as much content with it's course as possible; with failures, but always something to look forward to. And good warm people around, of course. And some sort of inner harmony. Sadness will always find a way, anyway, I don't need any additional.
I like stability, but it is the monotony I cannot stand. One of the things that I like about life is not knowing what to expect, and being forced to improvise some time or another.
But don't get the impression that I'm a bum who is constantly changing his mind and leaving everything; because I am quite a stable and routinary person.

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That line about you hating yourself for 'that' - does 'that' refer to 'being comfortable with' your life?
Somewhat.
I 'hate' myself because I am part of a struggling middle-class normal family, have caring parents, etc. so I shouldn't be complaining, as there are tons of people who have it worse than me.
And this is also an issue, as I do not dare tell anyone when I feel sad or un-happy, just because I am certain they will tell me that I am being silly.

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That's good for you - worrying about people you care for, I mean. I don't think I really care about anybody but myself, as crude as that sounds.
Don't think that I care about many people; the amount of relatives and acquaintances I get along with is quite small.

Quote:
Now, my translation of GF was hideous, as I've mentioned not once before, but translating GF must be a tough task to accomplish even for the professionals, due to the excess of puns and special terms in the game.
What language was your game in? Russian?


Quote:
Originally Posted by VmpireNaomi
About afterlife, does anyone believe in reincarnation? I'm positive that I was once a dog, no matter how utterly ridiculous it may sound. Laugh if you want, I don't mind. I think reincarnation is a very soothing option. If this life is a disappointment you may do better in the next. Of course, if one is one of those people who want to believe in eternal rest it may seem like hell instead.
I'm not too fond of the idea of reincarnation, mainly because having to go through all my life again would be tedious.
However, I like the idea of coming back to the world and being abke to start over; but just as a thought.

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Out of interest, do either of you believe in any sort of god or heigher being?
No, I I am a convinced atheist, and lost my faith a long time ago.

As any normal young idealist, I went through a period when I wanted to find a suitable religion; since I found none that I actually could believe in, I settled with agnosticism.

Later on, after several events in my life (some of those, tragic ones), I began to actually question the subject; and I soon came to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a deity (that was about the same time I found philosophy, art and history; which now take the task of being the subjects I read about most).
I also became closer to my father and my aunt (who share my views); and I am starting to get fed up with 'the Catholic Church', which is a debate for another time.



If you allow me to say it; you two are the most open-minded religious persons I know, and I truly respect you for that.



Quote:
El Virus, the delete option should be the first thing you see when you try to edit a message. If that still doesn't work for you, I can delete the double post, if you want.
It isn't there. But I don't want to trouble you.
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Old 12-28-2005, 08:01 AM   #127
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While I was typing (at a snail's pace), there appeared another post. Damn.

VampireNaomi
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The idea is that once you've lived a life good enough you can break free from the chain of being born again and again and become part of the world spirit which is what all souls crave for.
Aaah, now I remember hearing that somewhere, a long time ago. Well, that idea about becoming part of the 'world spirit' doesn't seem that bad to me, especially in comparison with no afterlife at all.

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Really? Why do you think you have no choice? Family pressures or something else? You're the first person who I've met who believes in Allah, online or real life. Then again, I don't really see a difference between Him and the God Christians and Jews believe in.
What is real here, is that you shouldn't take me very seriously in this (and most of the other serious matters, mind you). My family comes from Muslims, Judaists and Christians, but my parents are atheists, so I wasn't taught to believe in God - quite the opposite, even. And I'm not educated in religion enough to state here something - so I won't.
I don't talk religion when I meet Muslims or Judaists from my family, or family friends (which happens quite rarely since I live here and most of them there), I don't even try to pretend I understand it.

=====================
I don't have the DELETE option, either.
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Old 12-28-2005, 09:38 AM   #128
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No, I I am a convinced atheist, and lost my faith a long time ago.
I think that suits you. Even before I asked the question I sort of knew you would say that. I can't explain it, but you have a some sort of intellectual and non-religious air around you.

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If you allow me to say it; you two are the most open-minded religious persons I know, and I truly respect you for that.
And you're the most open-minded atheist I know. Too many people have laughed at my face for believing in anything and called me a mindless slave to the church.

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It isn't there. But I don't want to trouble you.
It's no trouble, really. Just one click of a button.

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What is real here, is that you shouldn't take me very seriously in this (and most of the other serious matters, mind you). My family comes from Muslims, Judaists and Christians, but my parents are atheists, so I wasn't taught to believe in God - quite the opposite, even. And I'm not educated in religion enough to state here something - so I won't.
I don't talk religion when I meet Muslims or Judaists from my family, or family friends (which happens quite rarely since I live here and most of them there), I don't even try to pretend I understand it.
I wouldn't say that. All your posts have been very insightful this far. Besides, does anybody really know anything worthwhile abour religions? Sure, we can quote the laws etc, but what I consider to be more important are people's personal views on them.

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I don't have the DELETE option, either.
That's odd. Looks like only moderators can delete posts, then. Pretty annoying, and I'm sure I could delete mine when I had just joined. Perhaps the board update changed that.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-28-2005, 10:04 AM   #129
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As a short introduction, one of the words I use most often is 'hate'. I hate people who are cleverer than me, they make me feel mentally incompetent, and I hate those who are more stupid than I am, for the same reason, basically. Conclusion here is that, probably, I just hate humans on the whole (or, more preciesly, interacting with them).
So much for the lyrical digression.


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That has been the thing with me; all I ever cared for was being old enough to do whatever I wanted <...>; and I lost my chances to enjoy some situations.
What could a child possibly want that isn't allowed to him? Or maybe it's just me, I was (and am) a spoiled child, never really denied anything I wanted. What situations are you talking about?

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I still adore imagining too, and it is why I practically never get bored, but it's not the same now.
I also don't play pirates under the table anymore; I wouldn't fit in there.
Though yes, it's hard for me to get bored, as well; however in my case I believe it is due to overall idleness, not vivid imagination.

-----------------------------
I wouldn't want to become a kid again; I've always believed that my current age is the best one ever.

You know, that's a strange thought - about you as a child. I can imagine some much too serious for his own good, pondering little guy, astounding adults with his pessimistic philosophic views of the universe and refusing to eat candy or run along with other kids in favour of reading Socrates.
I remember that when I was around thirteen, I once went to some distant aquaitance's of mother's house and there was this child, not older than eight, who was wise and intelligent as I'll never grow to be. One of the most embarrasing experiences in my life, it was. It's incredible how some adults can be so dumb, and virtually toddlers so sage. Though I suppose being as completely average as I am is... average.

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One of the things that I like about life is not knowing what to expect, and being forced to improvise some time or another.
But don't get the impression that I'm a bum who is constantly changing his mind and leaving everything.
I didn't get such an impression at all, don't worry: in your case it seems unlikely.
By the way, it's one of the things about my life I hate most: not knowing what to expect. Surprises. Mostly, both pleasant and unpleasant surprises end up badly for me. It's some talent I've got here, I suspect.

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I 'hate' myself because I am part of a struggling middle-class normal family, have caring parents, etc. so I shouldn't be complaining, as there are tons of people who have it worse than me.
And this is also an issue, as I do not dare tell anyone when I feel sad or un-happy, just because I am certain they will tell me that I am being silly.
Yep, when I'm complaining, they always tell me just that: that there're others who suffer much much more than I do, and I'm just being blind egoistic. Oh, and, of course, that everything is in the end my own fault. As if I didn't know that myself.
I don't think that 'it could be worse' is a credible argument, however. See, it always could be worse, no matter the situation.
As for not being able to tell anyone how you really feel - well, that only means you didn't find a right 'someone', yet.

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Don't think that I care about many people; the amount of relatives and acquaintances I get along with is quite small.
I didn't think that. Sincerely caring about the small amount of close people is what is considered normal. And good. It's certainly way better than not worrying about anybody but yourself.

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What language was your game in? Russian?
Hmpf. If you call that monstrosity I have on my disk Russian, then yes.

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If you allow me to say it; you two are the most open-minded religious persons I know, and I truly respect you for that.
Perhaps that's because we are not really religious.

I'm not sure what does the mysterious notion 'young idealist' mean, especially a normal one, but once I sort of mused it would be nice to have a religion. Out of interest. As for Islam - I still didn't find a time to explore the religion properly (all because of Harry Potter), but I want to believe and I will, it's as simple as that (well, plus a couple of personal little matters). Until I don't want. Allah help me. You won't find deep philosophical meaning when concerning me; I don't appreciate profound sacraments and grave approach to the subject (any subject) very much.

VampireNaomi
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you're the most open-minded atheist I know. Too many people have laughed at my face for believing in anything and called me a mindless slave to the church.
Those people you've met before were not atheists but downright cretins, then. If they think difference in belief somehow exuses rudeness.
Uhuh, one atheistic guy I liked very much once told me that, in his opinion, no belief is also a belief. Like, you know, a person has to believe in something, be that money, or Buddah, or fluffy little elephants in his head.

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Besides, does anybody really know anything worthwhile abour religions?
There's a kernel of truth there.
As for my personal views on my own religion - wait until I read Koran. Not happening in the near future, though.

Last edited by Charie; 12-28-2005 at 10:28 AM.
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Old 12-28-2005, 10:13 PM   #130
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Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
I think that suits you. Even before I asked the question I sort of knew you would say that. I can't explain it, but you have a some sort of intellectual and non-religious air around you.
Why, thanks .

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And you're the most open-minded atheist I know. Too many people have laughed at my face for believing in anything and called me a mindless slave to the church.
Not really, it all depends on the person and the situation I am confronted with.

I've certainly had my clashes with those extremely religious fellers who are not willing to give in on an argument and are extremely intolerant towards those different to them (Over birth control, ethics, Darwin and the government of my country, mostly). And as I have mentioned before, I hold a grudge against Church.

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It's no trouble, really. Just one click of a button.

That's odd. Looks like only moderators can delete posts, then. Pretty annoying, and I'm sure I could delete mine when I had just joined. Perhaps the board update changed that.
Fine then, it is the same for me. This type of things gets my post count going, but it should be erased.
Anyway, it's your call.

I recall being able to delete posts two months ago, they must have changed it .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
As a short introduction, one of the words I use most often is 'hate'. I hate people who are cleverer than me, they make me feel mentally incompetent, and I hate those who are more stupid than I am, for the same reason, basically. Conclusion here is that, probably, I just hate humans on the whole (or, more preciesly, interacting with them).
So much for the lyrical digression.
Same happens to me, practically. People who are far cleverer than me or know more than me in a given area, I can stand up to a certain point, then I just get fed up with what they have to say; and those who are what I consider to be 'idiotic ignorants' (I know a lot of these, they seem to be piling up on the streets and in my classroom) I tend to have some difficulty relating to. But it depends on each individual.

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What could a child possibly want that isn't allowed to him? Or maybe it's just me, I was (and am) a spoiled child, never really denied anything I wanted. What situations are you talking about?
I am a spoiled child too, which is not a hard thing to realise or to admit.

And I am happy with my life so far; but it's the possibility to do whatever you want without restrictions and the chance to have a job, what I like most about adulthood. I am also starting to get tired of school or any sort of mandatory studying, which is another purpose.

Quote:
You know, that's a strange thought - about you as a child. I can imagine some much too serious for his own good, pondering little guy, astounding adults with his pessimistic philosophic views of the universe and refusing to eat candy or run along with other kids in favour of reading Socrates.
Nah; I was a normal kid, who was just a tad more serious and timid than the rest.

But your idea describes my current adolescence better; and accurately, if you add that eccentric attire of mine.

Quote:
By the way, it's one of the things about my life I hate most: not knowing what to expect. Surprises. Mostly, both pleasant and unpleasant surprises end up badly for me. It's some talent I've got here, I suspect.
That's the bad side of it, a lot of surprises in life are unpleasant; and sadness takes away most of the happiness we have left.

For me, and up-tight guy who worries about everything(and I mean it), that can be quite tough.

Randomness is still good, though.

Quote:
Yep, when I'm complaining, they always tell me just that: that there're others who suffer much much more than I do, and I'm just being blind egoistic. Oh, and, of course, that everything is in the end my own fault. As if I didn't know that myself.
I don't think that 'it could be worse' is a credible argument, however. See, it always could be worse, no matter the situation.
Being told that repeatedly makes you feel bad about yourself, and in addition even insignificant; which only makes the problem worse.
Ahh, parents...

Quote:
As for not being able to tell anyone how you really feel - well, that only means you didn't find a right 'someone', yet.
Definitely. A shoulder to cry on, and somebody willing to listen, is one of the most positive things about a relationship.

Quote:
I didn't think that. Sincerely caring about the small amount of close people is what is considered normal. And good. It's certainly way better than not worrying about anybody but yourself.
I've always been told that friendship is the most important thing, and those clichés. So I always thought that having twenty friends was normal.

Of course, I don't give a damn about that. All I want is a circle of three friends to talk with about subjects I find interesting (kind of why I joined this place).

And about you; you seem to care about your father a lot, or at least you talk well about him, which makes me think you are not as self-minded as you claim to be .

Quote:
Hmpf. If you call that monstrosity I have on my disk Russian, then yes.
I don't suppose it was translated into Lithuanian or any other Baltic language; so forgive me if I was a bit speculative .

I cannot imagine that game in a Slavic language; it would have differed a lot.

Quote:
(all because of Harry Potter)
What's with Harry Potter?, I never got around reading those, and I have been driven off now by all the publicity and fuss around it.

Quote:
I'm not sure what does the mysterious notion 'young idealist' mean, especially a normal one, but once I sort of mused it would be nice to have a religion. Out of interest. As for Islam - I still didn't find a time to explore the religion properly (all because of Harry Potter), but I want to believe and I will, it's as simple as that (well, plus a couple of personal little matters). Until I don't want. Allah help me. You won't find deep philosophical meaning when concerning me; I don't appreciate profound sacraments and grave approach to the subject (any subject) very much.
I find the way you decided to go for a religion you did not know about much, and had not been thought to believe in, to be very interesting.
It certainly proves your determination and individuality. Besides, it's not as if it were Christianity, which is quite common; but Islamism, which due to the leading hegemonies, is a margined belief.

I think that a positive thing about religion is that I can give people hope.
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Old 12-29-2005, 03:23 AM   #131
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I hold a grudge against Church
What - personally? Why would you care, if you don't believe it?

-----------------------------
About clever/stupid folks.
Perhaps it comes from the sense of superiority, when 'far cleverer' people wouldn't want to descend to the level of those whom they consider mentally inferior, same as we wouldn't be eager to talk to those silly, in our opinion.
However I haven't met many fools in my life. My class had always been considered 'intelligent elite' of the school, and for a reason. It's terrific to live every day among oh-so-clever-perfect-scholar-minded coevals, and it also presents a perfect challenge. Oh, well... I suppose I've done worst of all after graduation.

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It's the possibility to do whatever you want without restrictions and the chance to have a job, what I like most about adulthood. I am also starting to get tired of school or any sort of mandatory studying, which is another purpose.
I still don't get what restrictions you are talking about. Those raised by the lack of your own money? Next, where do you work, if it's not top-secret, and what's so great about it?
That's just the issue with me. I know I need to go and work, but I'm scared to the core at the prospect. I don't qualify for anything good (much like that 'bunch of burros' Manny complained about), and finding a common low-rate job isn't quite a future I've always pictured for myself; I still can't accept this reality. Bury my head in the sand, currently.
What about Universities, aren't you going to enter one?

Quote:
But your idea describes my current adolescence better; and accurately, if you add that eccentric attire of mine.
That's intriguing. And how would you describe your attire-style, in detail? Why do you call it 'eccentric'?

Quote:
For me, an up-tight guy who worries about everything(and I mean it), that can be quite tough.
Me too, I also worry too much about everything - though, mainly, everything highly insignificant.

Quote:
Ahh, parents...
I guess they think the same about us.

Quote:
A shoulder to cry on, and somebody willing to listen, is one of the most positive things about a relationship.
'A shoulder to cry on', coming from a bloke, sounds so... so... cute! You know, men are supposed to provide a shoulder, not use one.

Quote:
I've always been told that friendship is the most important thing, and those clichés. So I always thought that having twenty friends was normal.<...>
And about you; you seem to care about your father a lot, or at least you talk well about him, which makes me think you are not as self-minded as you claim to be .
Hm, it doesn't seem proper to call the importance of friendship a 'cliche'. However, that 'twenty friends' reference of yours sounds nothing but ridiculous to me. I don't think one can possibly have many real friends; while 'fellows', for the lack of the better word, are entirely optional. Or I don't know; I've always accepted that to call somebody a Friend means a lot.

About me: yeees, I'm a father's daughter. He's great, intelligent, abstract-minded, and we share the same temperament-type and many passions (like an omnipresent Harry Potter, or idle talk about the construction of the universe); besides, I know I owe him.
But I'm somehow afraid that my own comfort would always come first for me. Anyway, I'm not willing to find out.

Quote:
I don't suppose it was translated into Lithuanian or any other Baltic language; so forgive me if I was a bit speculative .
I cannot imagine that game in a Slavic language; it would have differed a lot.
I haven't heard about the Lithuanian translation, but it might exist. Don't assume I know Lithuanian well enough, though, that I can tell you. I wonder which language I know worse: English or Lithuanian. However, the latter sounds horrible to my ears and I'm not even going to try to learn it.
Why can't you imagine a GF in Russian? If properly done, it could have been great. *sighs for Soviet school of doubling movies*

Quote:
What's with Harry Potter?, I never got around reading those, and I have been driven off now by all the publicity and fuss around it.
That was a grave mistake of yours to tempt me to talk about Potter. The last time I've talked about it, in real life, I had lost my voice eventually.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I've read the first book when there had already been four translations of them and the first movie, - by pure accident. I simply had an excess of money in my pocket and, walking by a bookstore, I idly mused whether that pompous sensation was actually worth reading. So I've bought the first one, spontaneously. The next day I've bought the second one, and the third the day after that. And the fourth, then. And later went to see the movie on it's last show in the local theatre (by the way, I still think that the first movie is the best). And since then, for four years or so now, I'm HP fan.

When I was reading the first few books for the first time, it was about magic in our real world, as if you could only look a little closer and notice it all around; it was a sort of a detective story in each tome, with an unpredicted (for me) villain; but, most important of all, it was and still is about PEOPLE. Their tangled relationships, prejudices and misunderstandings.

But as the things got further and Rowling proceeded writing the next books of Potteriana, it finally became clearly apparent that with Rowling nothing is what it seems. The first books, told from the point of view of a young Harry, appeared to be fairy-tales and nice magic stories only because of that: that Harry was young and didn't notice or comprehend much.
And now it seems that Potteriana have finally risen in it's true shape: a great post-modernistic detective story, where the author is a 'fugitive', and all the readers are 'detectives', trying to solve the clues in the text and find out the truth, eventually. You may imagine the trepidation with which the last book is being awaited, the one that will hold keys to most of the amazing mysteries.

But it is still a book about people, enclosed in the grand scheme of Rowling (and the character Dumbledore, the greatest magician of our times, or so it seems). The in-book un-meta plot of the story evolves around a man who became much like Hitler in the Wizarding World of Great Britain, his life, decisions and activity; and is told, with an exception of three chapters through all six current books, from the point of view of a young Harry Potter, a child and, later, adolescent with his own heavy issues and many flaws, but nevertheless fabulously kind and brave person, thrown - by the mighty union of Fate, Headmaster Dumbledore and JK Rowling - in a midst of frightful, adult and not a little painful events.

The characterization is sublime, every person appearing on the pages of Potteriana is a complete and fascinating individuality. There are no 'bad' or 'good' people in in the whole story; each and every one of them are human beings, sometimes with the most fantastic mixes of personality traits possible, and with their own sensible (or not very mush so) reasons to do what they are doing, their own feelings and history.

And on the top of it all that lies the grand scheme, which is reffered to as The Big Game of Professor Dumbledore sometimes, where it's each character is a piece of the major puzzle, and a puzzle in himself.
Harry Potter is still about magic, certainly, but only a bit. Potteriana is full of humor, puns, creative mythology and many, many dark adult matters, or simply adult and serious. You know, it's a story about Life.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I reckon I owe you an apology for this listless excursus into Potter; it seems the book can't cease putting me in the 'Lupe' mode.

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I think that a positive thing about religion is that I can give people hope.
What kind of hope do you mean?
For me, it's mainly a guidance, and additional much-needed help in difficult desicios. Provides some sort of inner peace, as well. If by 'hope' you mean an idea of not being alone, then you might be right. In my case, I mean.

Well, it's just kind of inane matter I would like to believe in, it is all the same insignificant in the daily routine.
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Old 12-29-2005, 04:14 AM   #132
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Fine then, it is the same for me. This type of things gets my post count going, but it should be erased.
Well, I'll get rid of it after posting this. It's been a while since I got to play God and I need my delusions of power.

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What - personally? Why would you care, if you don't believe it?
I know this was directed at El Virus, but a lot of atheists I know don't like the church because it tries to control people's lives and is eager to judge those who don't live by the moral rules they've set. Also, lots of inhuman actions have taken place because of church. Then again, it also depends on what church we're talking about.

Virus, you're probably under the influence of the Catholic Church, am I right?

Charie, your views on Harry Potter are fascinating. I preferred the first four books because they were the only ones that surprised me in the end. The last two have been a little too obvious and I guess I miss the childlike innocence of the first books. Still, they're definitely worth reading and shouldn't be overlooked just because they're popular.

Virus, who is that in your current avatar? Lenin?


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Old 12-29-2005, 06:00 AM   #133
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I know this was directed at El Virus, but a lot of atheists I know don't like the church because it tries to control people's lives and is eager to judge those who don't live by the moral rules they've set. Also, lots of inhuman actions have taken place because of church.
Ya, that's what I was asking about: whether that 'grudge' involves something more personal or is it only overall sense of righteousness. The notion of 'having a grudge against something' includes some degree of personal involvment, I would think.

I certainly agree that various religeous institutions throughout the world, when controlled by greedy cool-hearted bastards of people, use faith as an exuse and a tool to coerce human masses to whatever is advantageous to solely them. This has always been like this and unfortunately still is. You know, I just don't get it: just why would people want to commit murders, wage wars and, on the whole, cause so much suffering to each other?
I don't know History at all, but somehow examples of crimes commited under the pretence of religeous doctrines jump into head on their own accord.

However, it still has nothing to do with religeon itself. Religeon is about the way to make yourslf a better person, to live peacefully under some or other common human rules, and seek knowledge/enlightment. Do you remember any sacred rule which would tell, 'go and kill each other, my beloved children; steal and cause harm, neglect and abuse'? Pf. If there is, it's some too smart editor's remark, I'm certain. Like those Gospels by Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John, each of them adding something of his own creation (not bad things, of course, mainly). John especially. (Mark has my respect in this matter, though). And then copysts continuing broadening the tale.
And religeon is personal. You don't have to answer to anybody except yourself and the God. And common sense wasn't canceled either.

Quote:
I preferred the first four books because they were the only ones that surprised me in the end. <...>, they're definitely worth reading and shouldn't be overlooked just because they're popular.
For you Kreacher was obvious? For me not in the world. And I'm ashamed to admit I haven't read the sixth book; only a third part of it, the night it appeared for the public, in the wave of everyone's around me enthusiasm. Not that I don't want to, it's just that I still... plan to. Mhm. All my HP-friends have read it a long time ago, certainly, my father included. We even had a row once on the sore subject of Snape's loyalties.

I love the way later books open your eyes on the events in the previous ones. Every line somehow significant, and smallest details from the past playing a big part in the future events. And vice-versa. And, of course, the complicated inter-character relationships, starting with the first books - it's just not obvious there, until you stop taking them as fairy-tales but a whole same reality.

'My views' on Harry Potter are combined views of fandom, with a great influence of my favoutire 'Big Game' fan-research.

------------------------------------------------------
Lenin must be bald. Couldn't be him.
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Old 12-29-2005, 06:27 AM   #134
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However, it still has nothing to do with religeon itself. Religeon is about the way to make yourslf a better person, to live peacefully under some or other common human rules, and seek knowledge/enlightment. Do you remember any sacred rule which would tell, 'go and kill each other, my beloved children; steal and cause harm, neglect and abuse'? Pf. If there is, it's some too smart editor's remark, I'm certain.
Couldn't have said it better myself. If only more people, religious and non-religious equally, understood that. Besides, I don't think one needs the church to be religious. I mean, if someone has a problem with the chuch, they can still be religious on their own, right?

I also grow quite frustrated with people who insist that killing in the name of religion is right. Especially since these people are usually the first to judge women who've had an abortion etc.

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For you Kreacher was obvious? For me not in the world. And I'm ashamed to admit I haven't read the sixth book; only a third part of it, the night it appeared for the public, in the wave of everyone's around me enthusiasm. Not that I don't want to, it's just that I still... plan to. Mhm. All my HP-friends have read it a long time ago, certainly, my father included. We even had a row once on the sore subject of Snape's loyalties.
Now that you mention it, I can't remember if I guessed Kreacher's involvement, but at least it wasn't a shock in the same way the Crouch Jr. thing was in the fourth book. That was something totally unexpected.

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I love the way later books open your eyes on the events in the previous ones. Every line somehow significant, and smallest details from the past playing a big part in the future events. And vice-versa. And, of course, the complicated inter-character relationships, starting with the first books - it's just not obvious there, until you stop taking them as fairy-tales but a whole same reality.
True, true. It's fascinating how the later books make you go back to the previous ones to find the hints hidden there. I particularly liked how Sirius was mentioned in the first book even though he became important in the third one. Such a small detail, but it makes the world seem a lot more real.

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Lenin must be bald. Couldn't be him.
True. That's was confused me. Without the hair he would look a little like Lenin.


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Old 12-29-2005, 07:02 AM   #135
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I also grow quite frustrated with people who insist that killing in the name of religion is right.
They are just mad. I don't know. I can't comprehend it in the slightest. The 'killing in the name of religion' usually stands for 'in the name of some big evil guy in the current highest ranks of religion's main institution', or so I think. Somebody obviously needs it.

Quote:
Now that you mention it, I can't remember if I guessed Kreacher's involvement, but at least it wasn't a shock in the same way the Crouch Jr. thing was in the fourth book. That was something totally unexpected.
For me Quirrel, Ginny, Pettigrew, Crouch Jr. and Kreacher were all highly unexpected. Perhaps by the time of the fifth book we've just grown accustomed to such surprises and took it as a habit to suspect each and everyone. Constant vigilance)).
Besides, wasn't Snape a shock in himself, even despite the Unbreakable Vow?

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I particularly liked how Sirius was mentioned in the first book even though he became important in the third one. Such a small detail, but it makes the world seem a lot more real.
Oh, I need to reread all the books, frankly. I don't remember details. What was he doing there, for real?.. Too late to warn Potters, if memory serves me.
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Old 12-29-2005, 08:02 AM   #136
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The 'killing in the name of religion' usually stands for 'in the name of some big evil guy in the current highest ranks of religion's main institution', or so I think. Somebody obviously needs it.
Indeed. People should learn to think themselves instead of following some madman.

Quote:
Besides, wasn't Snape a shock in himself, even despite the Unbreakable Vow?
Not really. I had been suspecting him for quite a while.

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What was he doing there, for real?.. Too late to warn Potters, if memory serves me.
Hagrid mentions him in the beginning and says that he borrowed Sirius' motor cycle.

Quite fascinating how this thread came from discussing Manny's "reaperdom" to religion and Harry Potter.


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Old 12-29-2005, 08:57 AM   #137
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So many things to quote...
This one is going to be long.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
My class had always been considered 'intelligent elite' of the school, and for a reason. It's terrific to live every day among oh-so-clever-perfect-scholar-minded coevals, and it also presents a perfect challenge.
Heh, it's the complete opposite here. My class is considered the worst. Teachers are constantly comparing us to the rest of the high school, mainly because most misbehave and don't do well at school. And what is even better, we have earned the reputation of being the class that complains about anything so they do not take us seriously anymore.

What bothers me the most is that I go to a private institution (not exactly cheap), and the place is a mess. On winter, we have no proper heating (er, last year there was a gas leak; so we had to stand all winter without a heater); our blackboard can’t be written on; we have power shortages; on summer, there is no air conditioning, only a fan (which is broken, by the way), and due to the noisy street we have to have the windows closed. One would think that they would use the money they make for repairs, but they keep it al to themselves.

Sorry, I have to vent & bitch somewhere.

Quote:
I still don't get what restrictions you are talking about. Those raised by the lack of your own money? Next, where do you work, if it's not top-secret, and what's so great about it?
I would like to have the career I want to (I am sure that I will be a workaholic, some time or another), being taken more seriously and having more responsibilities; thats all.
I don't work, officially at least. It's not common over here for a minor to do sod. But I am working as my father's assistant; and could have a chance in some other jobs, but working right now does not good for me.

And the only way I can become a private investigator with a degree on forensic science is if I go to a University and do a six-month course on PI.
At least that's what I want to become now; but my love for History may have some say in what I do sooner or later.

Do you have any idea of what you'd like to follow?
Finding the right career is probably one of the most important and difficult decisions one has to make (or so I have been told).

Quote:
That's intriguing. And how would you describe your attire-style, in detail? Why do you call it 'eccentric'?
I'll make it short, because I could go on forever.

Elegant and Vintage clothing are my thing. Hats, suits, shoes, you name it; especially those of the 40s. The problem is that a 16-year old dressed on such 'elaborate' things is usually seen as somebody who wants attention (ironically, I hate being in the spotlight). Try to wear a boater hat on summer without people laughing at you.
It's eccentric because dressing on things of an exclusive period is rather strange; people usually say "It's the XXIst century, you now?" or similar things (or just stare at you). (Of course, I might dress more casually on summer, but the rest of the year it's like that).

Ahh, materialism...

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'A shoulder to cry on', coming from a bloke, sounds so... so... cute! You know, men are supposed to provide a shoulder, not use one.
I could answer with a stereotype about women, you know

The truth, I am one of those sensible men; which can be a curse sometimes.

Quote:
I've always accepted that to call somebody a Friend means a lot.
That is why I barely use it; it is a word that should be reserved for people one truly cares for, and I still don't have many opportunities to use it.

Are either of you the kind who make friends easily?

Quote:
Why can't you imagine a GF in Russian?
I adore that language, but somehow a game that has so much Spanish content must be strange; they didn’t include words in Spanish, did they?

Is Russian your main language?

Quote:
I've read the first book when there had already been four translations of them and the first movie, - by pure accident. I simply had an excess of money in my pocket and, walking by a bookstore, I idly mused whether that pompous sensation was actually worth reading.
[…]
You know, it's a story about Life.
That's one deep way to put it. I always thought it to be a commercially overrated thing; guess I'll have to spare my prejudice.

But fantasy...I've never cared about the genre.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Me
I think that a positive thing about religion is that I can give people hope.
Sorry, that should have been 'it'. It's amazing how a simple letter missing and capitalizing the one remaining can change the meaning of a sentence, and make one look like a god.

It can give people hope, for it helps as a guide, for some; and it gives strength to others.

Quote:
-For me Quirrel, Ginny, Pettigrew, Crouch Jr. and Kreacher were all highly unexpected. Perhaps by the time of the fifth book we've just grown accustomed to such surprises and took it as a habit to suspect each and everyone. Constant vigilance)).
Besides, wasn't Snape a shock in himself, even despite the Unbreakable Vow?

-Hagrid mentions him in the beginning and says that he borrowed Sirius' motor cycle.
I don't get a word of what you're saying...

Quote:
What - personally? Why would you care, if you don't believe it?
But it has to do with what VampireNaomi said.

[Before you read what follows, keep in mind I am a biased person]

If there is something I believe in, is the separation between Religion and Politics. They are two different things, and should never go together.
The first is something that you might believe in or not; if you do, you'll probably stick by the values preached by it; if you don't, there is no reason why you should be forced to. And the latter, politics, is something that needs to exist (unless you believe that every sort of governmental institution is wrong; but you would be an Anarchist, and that is an ideology as well), without it Man wouldn't be organized, and civilization as we know it wouldn't exist.
Now, the deal with the Catholic Church is that they are trying to influence governments all over the world; and that does matter me. This is especially true in my country, were we have many high-ranked church members criticizing every move towards civil liberties. Abortion for example is an issue that they constantly keep trying to influence people in; and the things that they are willing to spread just to stop it are incredible (i.e. "Abortion is murder, choose life!"). This will sound extremist, but every move they make in favor of their selfish beliefs (I'm not even sure what they get out of it, money?, power?; they certainly couldn't care less about people), is one more move against total freedom.


Quote:
I also grow quite frustrated with people who insist that killing in the name of religion is right.
"God told me to invade I_ _q" A president once said; this is a sybol to anything I think is wrong.

No matter in the name of what huge cause, killing is probably never right. War is a real stupidity, and despite how many things leaders claim, they are not doing it in the name of freedom, but for their own profit. At least, that's in theory; there are extreme cases, and those need to be dealt with on some way.

Just out of curiosity and with other purposes; what's your stance on abortion?

But, I'm getting carried away, and I am not looking foward to hurt anybody.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
Virus, who is that in your current avatar? Lenin?
Close. It's Leon Trotsky, whom I always thought to be more capable than Vladimir Lenin himself. On a way, it's a real shame he was murdered.

I think I am going for this avatar, but I don't know.


*Sigh*
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Old 12-29-2005, 10:03 AM   #138
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What bothers me the most is that I go to a private institution (not exactly cheap), and the place is a mess. On winter, we have no proper heating (er, last year there was a gas leak; so we had to stand all winter without a heater); our blackboard can’t be written on; we have power shortages; on summer, there is no air conditioning, only a fan (which is broken, by the way), and due to the noisy street we have to have the windows closed. One would think that they would use the money they make for repairs, but they keep it al to themselves.
Wow, that's unbelievable. Can't you complain to someone or even sue whoever is in charge? Or are there any other possible schools in the area? How can they expect anyone to put any effort into their studies in a environment like that?

Quote:
And the only way I can become a private investigator with a degree on forensic science is if I go to a University and do a six-month course on PI.
Private investigator? That would be awsome. I think you've got the right state of mind to be one of those world-weary detectives you see in the old movies. At least you know enough about history, politics, philosphy etc. to have interesting internal monologues. Good luck with chasing your dream.

I don't really know what to say to your problem with the Catholic Church. The situation your describe is alien to me and I have no idea what it is like to live in a country where the church has so much power. As you said, the church should have no say in politics. Didn't some very important guy say that? Martin Luther or someone like that?

Quote:
Close. It's Leon Trotsky, whom I always thought to be more capable than Vladimir Lenin himself. On a way, it's a real shame he was murdered.
Ow, didn't even think of him. I really should visit the Lenin Museum some time to get to know these things.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

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Old 12-29-2005, 11:14 PM   #139
El Virus
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Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
Wow, that's unbelievable. Can't you complain to someone or even sue whoever is in charge? Or are there any other possible schools in the area? How can they expect anyone to put any effort into their studies in a environment like that?
Nah, it's a waste of time.
I agree with what you say, but they tend to avoid me anyway.

The good thing about my school is that it's educational level is better than that of a public school, and it gives me the chance to take many international exams.

The problem here is that public schools are in even worse conditions, and their education is eclipsed by the strikes the teachers cause (they are paid far too little; and it's an important job; I knew a public school teacher who had to work as a cab driver and a nurse as well, just to mantain his family) and the amazingly great scholar program which leaves a lot to wish for (history for instance, is one subject which is thought the wrong way); etc.

I would love to be home-schooled, but it's not a common thing here.

School is a thing, which to the surprise of some, I loathe. It will sound arrogant, but the things that I have learnt alone are those that still tick with me (not that I haven't learnt anything at that place; but what I mostly get is nervous problems); I do hesitantly recognize its importance.

Quote:
Private investigator? That would be awsome. I think you've got the right state of mind to be one of those world-weary detectives you see in the old movies. At least you know enough about history, politics, philosphy etc. to have interesting internal monologues. Good luck with chasing your dream.
Many people think that I take Film Noir far too seriously. But it has more to do with the fact that I can do the same as a 'forensic scientist' but without a boss (and working mostly by myself; paradise indeed).
The way I put it, it seemed as if it would only require 6 months of university. It actually is a six-month course and 5 + years in medicine and laws.

What about you? Do you have any idea of what you will do?

Quote:
I don't really know what to say to your problem with the Catholic Church. The situation your describe is alien to me and I have no idea what it is like to live in a country where the church has so much power. As you said, the church should have no say in politics. Didn't some very important guy say that? Martin Luther or someone like that?
Uhuh, and the funniest thing is that some sources show that countries which have separated the Church from the State (and have a big percentage of non-believers) are doing better on every sense (except on suicide rates).

Quote:
Ow, didn't even think of him. I really should visit the Lenin Museum some time to get to know these things.
I'm planning to go to Europe in the near future (in about 1-2 years), and that is one of the places I'm looking forward to visiting.
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Old 12-30-2005, 02:43 AM   #140
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This comes as an answer to everyting above exept the last El Virus's post. Shaitan, I'm slow.

VampireNaomi
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Not really. I had been suspecting [Snape] for quite a while.
Since I haven't read the book I can't really say anything on the matter, but when I first heard the rumour: 'you-know-who killed you-know-who' - it was somewhat a strong blow. Because I trust Severus Snape. Still, or at least until the seventh book proves me wrong.

El Virus
Quote:
<about school> Sorry, I have to vent & bitch somewhere.
Accumulating bad emotions without giving a vent to them from time to time isn't healthy, anyway.

I went to the free public school, which was all but falling to pieces, on the outside, mostly because the building served as a hospital during the War and was hardly renewed since then. But that is highly uncommon, plus inside it was completely all right. Besides, our teachers were ones of the best in town - from Russian schools, I mean. Can't imagine how a private school can exist with the conditions you have described, but I guess it's too late for you to change institution; so - my condolences, if you permit me.

Quote:
At least that's what I want to become now; but my love for History may have some say in what I do sooner or later.
I suppose you'd make a terrific (in the best sense of the word) historian. I've heard that's an amazingly interesting field of work, for a devouted soul; yet I reckon it's extremely hard to become anything big in it.
Mmm. I admit have a soft spot for historians thanks to the History teacher I had at school (I wonder what made him go and teach, though, for his main profession was researcher/archaeologist, something like that). To listen to him talking about - about whatever historian, actually - was a sheer bliss. All sounded more like involving fiction stories, or, better to say, beautiful tales from far past (or not very far); however, hurrying to write down his lections was hell. By the way, he'd always worn painstakingly neat formal, one could even say, old-fashioned clothes, and never gave in on the question of the mark he thought you deserved, the bastard. He was thirty-five, I suppose, when I was in the final form, my close friend had a charming crush on him.

Quote:
Do you have any idea of what you'd like to follow?
Finding the right career is probably one of the most important and difficult decisions one has to make (or so I have been told).
Yep, that's important, although most people end up doing something completely different from what they had in mind or studied for. I guess that's what's going to happen to me after all, for I've known exactly what I wanted to study since I was a very small kid. One of the faculties in the Academy of Arts. I'd been looking forward to it for as long as I remember myself (that's not much, mind you; my memory's tricky), until something happened, about two years ago, and made practically a ruin of me. And I still don't particularly feel like a phoenix to rise from the ashes.

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The problem is that a 16-year old dressed on such 'elaborate' things is usually seen as somebody who wants attention (ironically, I hate being in the spotlight).
So, unusual hats, suits, shoes and, I bet, starched shirts (that's my special fetish). Your style sounds engaging, you know. Aren't there battalions of girls falling at you feet?
Sometimes I know I'd love to look as old-fashioned as I could, but my clothes are not many and there's no particular style in them, so I don't really have much to do about it.
As for spotlights, I don't think that providing eye-candy for the passers-by is the same as being in the spotlight. To end up in the spotlight one have to act in an eye-catching way, not just look funny.
'A memorable picture of an incomparably dressed Mexican (or, what country are you from, actually? I'm as good in Geography as in Philosophy) boy, reciting ancient wisdoms in the moonlight under the tent of palm leaves'. Oil on canvas.
...Absurd art, more like, isn't it?


Quote:
I could answer with a stereotype about women, you know.
The truth, I am one of those sensible men; which can be a curse sometimes.
What stereotype? That we are supposed to cry on somebody's shoulders? I used to do that quite a lot, some time ago. Nervous breakdown, it's called.
If you mean 'sensible' as 'sensitive' (which you might not, certainly), why's that a 'curse'?

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Are either of you the kind who make friends easily?
A tough question. I suppose I am; I would make friends easily if I needed more than one person at a time. Sort of antisocial; one friend means I can give him a proper attention: literally, all the attention I'm willing to spare on relations.

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I adore that language, but somehow a game that has so much Spanish content must be strange; they didn’t include words in Spanish, did they?
Is Russian your main language?
Of course they did include Spanish words, they 'translated' it from English, after all.
I love Russian, too, and yes, that's my main language. And the only one, actually, if you won't count that scant amount of English and the even scantier Lithuanian I fumble with. I was born in USSR, and my father's Russian. Lithuania is only a territory where my parents have met, accidentially, and I'm proud to say I have nothing to do with Lithuanians at all. I don't have a native country, like most of my friends.
Do you know Russian language?

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I always thought [Harry Potter] to be a commercially overrated thing; guess I'll have to spare my prejudice.
But fantasy...I've never cared about the genre.
That's one of those weird examples of a really worthy and commercially overrated things.
I don't know if I care about fantasy, for I've never read any, save for the 'Lord of the Rings'. I don't consider Harry Potter fantasy at all. Well, there is magic and some mythological creatures, but the world is perfectly real - it's our world, that's the beauty of it. Only with a little admission that wizardry does exist. I wouldn't know in what genre to place HP; the closest would probably be a tale, but it is much too real for that.

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Sorry, that should have been 'it'. It's amazing how a simple letter missing and capitalizing the one remaining can change the meaning of a sentence, and make one look like a god.
*blink blink* I didn't notice that.
Yeah, I suppose you can give people hope. That humanity isn't that lost of a case, that is.

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I don't get a word of what you're saying... [about HP]
That's because you loose your time reading all that scientific nonsense, amigo. We, the frightful and mighty potter-fans, make science of nonsense, on the other hand.

Quote:
<...>politics, is something that needs to exist (unless you believe that every sort of governmental institution is wrong; but you would be an Anarchist<...>
Now, the deal with the Catholic Church is that they are trying to influence governments all over the world; and that does matter me. This is especially true in my country, were we have many high-ranked church members criticizing every move towards civil liberties.
What would you call a person who knows that politics needs to exist, but all the same considers it downright wrong? You may call me Charie, or VIP, as in Very Ignorant Politically. Like Count Almaviva said, can't do anything about it, so I just have to stand it.

Like VampireNaomi, I'm very far from the situation you have described. I wonder if the official Church has any control here; I guess if it has any, then definitely not much. Apart from overall free-like European views, here it probably has something to do with the still lingering post-USSR antireligious spirits.
What you have told reminds me of what I've heard about Middle Ages, somehow. Makes me wonder even more as to what country you live in.

Quote:
"God told me to invade I_ _q" A president once said; this is a sybol to anything I think is wrong.
He did say that? 0.0 Everyone tells me Bush is a real jerk, to put it lightly. My father visited me yesterday and we talked about Iraq, among other things, a bit. Do I understand it right that Americans went to Iraq for oil? If so, did they get it, eventually?

Quote:
Just out of curiosity and with other purposes; what's your stance on abortion?
Mother's choice, of course. I don't get it how it could be anyone else's buisness. Besides, is my guess right and most of anti-abortion fellows are men?
Also, I don't see it as murder. Murder is a kill of a human, isn't it? And a three-months fetal doesn't sound like a human to me. Not yet. If I remember biology, a human fetal shares quite a few traits with many other spieces' fetal forms.
But I don't understand motherhood (or biology) that well, thus I may sound cynical.

Quote:
Close. It's Leon Trotsky.
Oh. I should have guessed.
...Well, I rarely do what I should.
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Old 12-30-2005, 03:13 AM   #141
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I feel guilty of writing too much.

El Virus, in addition.
Quote:
It will sound arrogant, but the things that I have learnt alone are those that still tick with me (not that I haven't learnt anything at that place; but what I mostly get is nervous problems); I do hesitantly recognize its importance.
It sounds entirely normal. I've always thought that that's just the thing school is for: to give you tasks and then correct your mistakes. Of course most the studies happen at home, especially when the teacher isn't a gifted one. Our class hardly attended usual classes led by average teachers, save for getting tasks and writing tests. Well, in the upper forms, at least. But we were lucky and got most of the best teachers, whose lessons were really something.

I guess teachers don't get much salary all around the world. Most of mine had some other jobs, as well.

Quote:
The way I put it, it seemed as if it would only require 6 months of university. It actually is a six-month course and 5 + years in medicine and laws.
We could understand the implication .

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I'm planning to go to Europe in the near future (in about 1-2 years), and that is one of the places I'm looking forward to visiting.
What, Lenin Museum in Finland?
I've heard Finland to be a beautiful country.
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Old 12-30-2005, 04:20 AM   #142
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Quote:
The good thing about my school is that it's educational level is better than that of a public school, and it gives me the chance to take many international exams.
How long do you have to keep studying there until you can move elsewhere? That reminds me, I have no idea how old you are.

Quote:
The problem here is that public schools are in even worse conditions, and their education is eclipsed by the strikes the teachers cause (they are paid far too little; and it's an important job; I knew a public school teacher who had to work as a cab driver and a nurse as well, just to mantain his family) and the amazingly great scholar program which leaves a lot to wish for (history for instance, is one subject which is thought the wrong way); etc.
That poor teacher. My Brazilian friend told me that public schools have such problems in that part of the world, but I never suspected it could be that bad for the teachers.

Out of interest, how is history taught wrong?

Quote:
School is a thing, which to the surprise of some, I loathe. It will sound arrogant, but the things that I have learnt alone are those that still tick with me (not that I haven't learnt anything at that place; but what I mostly get is nervous problems); I do hesitantly recognize its importance.
I don't think it's arrogant. I'm sure that most people would hate school if they had to study in similar conditions to yours. And studying in an institution just isn't meant for all people, regardless of the conditions or their intellectual level. In some way you remind me of Mika Waltari, a Finnish author who loathed the idea of finishing his education because he felt it took time from what he really loved; writing.

Quote:
But it has more to do with the fact that I can do the same as a 'forensic scientist' but without a boss (and working mostly by myself; paradise indeed).
Are there a lot of private investigators over there? Is it a profitable profession? What kind of jobs do you expect to get? As you can guess, this is a profession I only know from movies and don't know a thing about its realitites.

Quote:
What about you? Do you have any idea of what you will do?
Heh, I'm going to become a teacher and teach kids how to speak English and German. It's not really what I want to do, but I want to work with languages, it's a relatively respected and well paid profession with weekends, Christmas, summer, Easter etc. always off duty so, it's worth it.

Quote:
Uhuh, and the funniest thing is that some sources show that countries which have separated the Church from the State (and have a big percentage of non-believers) are doing better on every sense (except on suicide rates).
True. We're somewhere on the top of the suicide list. I think it's because people have forgotten the meaning of really caring about each other. Our society sets firm rules; you have to be young, beautiful and successful if you want to be worth anything. If you fail to accomplish that you've failed in life.

Quote:
I'm planning to go to Europe in the near future (in about 1-2 years), and that is one of the places I'm looking forward to visiting.
Give a shout if you do. I'll give you a tour in The Spy Museum

Charie (stole your colour idea )

Quote:
Since I haven't read the book I can't really say anything on the matter, but when I first heard the rumour: 'you-know-who killed you-know-who' - it was somewhat a strong blow. Because I trust Severus Snape. Still, or at least until the seventh book proves me wrong.
Oh, I trust him too. There is a scene in the book that must be mean that everything is not what it seems.

Quote:
What, Lenin Museum in Finland?
Yeah, it's in Tampere. Never been there though, sadly.

And you say your first language is Russian? You've got such a beautiful alphabet, you know. I studied one course of it at school, but quit because it was interactive studying and I hate that.

And your English is very good, so you could very well call it your second language.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-30-2005, 05:59 AM   #143
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That reminds me, I have no idea how old you [, El Virus,] are.
He stated his birthday date in his profile.

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Out of interest, how is history taught wrong?
I keep answering questions not directed at me.
History is a subject which could be taught the wrongest way possible at school in a country with prejudiced goverment. No need to search far for an example: take USSR's role in the world's events. In Lithuania, it is a very common thing nowadays to vilify everything concerning Soviet Union, and completely bathe it in dirt - - because those sycophants of the governors lick USA's... well, whatever. So, when it was still USSR here, all History textbooks were, understandably, full of praise solely to Soviets, while now everything coming from there is proudly presented as mud. Re-writing History to accomodate current powers in control is too usual a thing, sadly.
Our school's historian never once used an officially recommended textbook.

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[private investigator] is a profession I only know from movies and don't know a thing about its realitites.
You still know way more about it than me. I've only read Sherlock Holmes, and so much for the private investigators.

Quote:
There is a scene in the book that must be mean that everything is not what it seems.
The whole series just shout that Severus's Dumbledore's man. I think. Which particular scene do you refer to?

Quote:
And you say your first language is Russian? You've got such a beautiful alphabet, you know.
And your English is very good, so you could very well call it your second language.
A beautiful alphabet? That's a newsflash. What's so beautiful about it? *perplexed*
As for my English - you don't know a half about it. I need to check almost every word in the dictionary. The sad part of it is that dictionaries won't tell me how to properly use tenses. I wonder if I could speak in English.

What languages do you know? I take it that they are quite a few.
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Old 12-30-2005, 08:17 AM   #144
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Quote:
He stated his birthday date in his profile.
Oops. That's what you get when you're too lazy to check.

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History is a subject which could be taught the wrongest way possible at school in a country with prejudiced goverment. No need to search far for an example: take USSR's role in the world's events. In Lithuania, it is a very common thing nowadays to vilify everything concerning Soviet Union, and completely bathe it in dirt - - because those sycophants of the governors lick USA's... well, whatever. So, when it was still USSR here, all History textbooks were, understandably, full of praise solely to Soviets, while now everything coming from there is proudly presented as mud. Re-writing History to accomodate current powers in control is too usual a thing, sadly.
I suspected something like that, but specific examples are always interesting. And it sort of makes you paranoid because you can't be sure that whatever is taught to you is correct. I remember my previous History teacher who would throw all kinds of anti-Russian garbage at us in class while conviniently forgetting to tell about the bad things we did.

Quote:
The whole series just shout that Severus's Dumbledore's man. I think. Which particular scene do you refer to?
I'm thinking of the scene in which Dumbledore and Snape argue, and Snape says he doesn't like/want to do something. Even if that scene doesn't mean what I think it does, there must be some explanation for it in the final book.

Quote:
A beautiful alphabet? That's a newsflash. What's so beautiful about it? *perplexed*
It's so exotic, especially all the different variations of "s". Besides, how can you look at something like this: "домохозяйкой" and say it's not beautiful?

Quote:
What languages do you know? I take it that they are quite a few.
Apart from Finnish and English, only Swedish and German. I'm not even nearly fluent in either, though.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-30-2005, 10:01 AM   #145
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And it sort of makes you paranoid because you can't be sure that whatever is taught to you is correct.
That's right, history is very dependant on the particular opinions of it's tellers; in order to get some relatively objective view one should read really a lot of material. Concerning the newest history, at least.

Quote:
Besides, how can you look at something like this: "домохозяйкой" and say it's not beautiful?
Well, I hope I'll never become just 'домохозяйкой', it doesn't sound very beautiful to me)).
That's a highly strange notion for me to think that Cyrillic writing is 'exotic'. I doesn't look all that different from Roman one.

Quote:
Apart from Finnish and English, only Swedish and German. I'm not even nearly fluent in either, though.
A nice start to become a polyglot, hmm?

--------------------------------------------------------------
Rowling says we will get most of the answers in book seven, but think of how long we'll have to wait (and cross swords over Snape's morals).
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Old 12-30-2005, 10:21 AM   #146
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Well, I hope I'll never become just ''домохозяйкой, it doesn't sound very beautiful to me)).
Really? What does it mean? I just chose a random word that looked nice.

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Rowling says we will get most of the answers in book seven, but think of how long we'll have to wait (and cross swords over Snape's morals).
True, but I think I prefer waiting to the feeling you'll get after you've finished the last book and realise that there won't be more, ever.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-30-2005, 10:26 AM   #147
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Originally Posted by Charie
Can't imagine how a private school can exist with the conditions you have described, but I guess it's too late for you to change institution; so - my condolences, if you permit me.
Me neither, but private schools in here are very common (for the so called "middle classes", I mean); for what I've heard, in other countries they are more expensive. There is always the option of those very-expensive schools, but they are full of snobs and are not worth it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
I suppose you'd make a terrific (in the best sense of the word) historian. I've heard that's an amazingly interesting field of work, for a
devouted soul; yet I reckon it's extremely hard to become anything big in it.
The problem is hat I enjoy the history of practically anything, and that field requires you to specialize in one topic in general. Time will tell what I follow, though.

Quote:
Mmm. I admit have a soft spot for historians thanks to the History teacher I had at school (I wonder what made him go and teach, though, for his main profession was researcher/archaeologist, something like that).
[…]
He was thirty-five, I suppose, when I was in the final form, my close friend had a charming crush on him.
He sure sounds like a nice person.
I have a literature and plastic arts teacher I really care for.
That kind of thing is very helpful to motivate you, in order to at least study or work a bit harder.

Quote:
One of the faculties in the Academy of Arts. I'd been looking forward to it for as long as I remember myself (that's not much, mind you; my memory's tricky), until something happened, about two years ago, and made practically a ruin of me. And I still don't particularly feel like a phoenix to rise from the ashes.
Wow. What sort of Arts were you interested in?

Quote:
So, unusual hats, suits, shoes and, I bet, starched shirts (that's my special fetish). Your style sounds engaging, you know. Aren't there battalions of girls falling at you feet?
Sometimes I know I'd love to look as old-fashioned as I could, but my clothes are not many and there's no particular style in them, so I don't really have much to do about it.
Not that I am aware of. But most of the people I know dress like everyone else and either tend to dislike formal-wear or my serious and shy personality. Anyway, the women I tend to encounter are not 'my type' (or vice versa).

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'A memorable picture of an incomparably dressed Mexican (or, what country are you from, actually? I'm as good in Geography as in Philosophy) boy, reciting ancient wisdoms in the moonlight under the tent of palm leaves'. Oil on canvas.
...Absurd art, more like, isn't it?
Mexican?

No I'm from Argentina; one of the countries in the so called "South" America which could have chances to have a great economy, but we have wasted it all thanks to the excellent governments we have had in the past decades.
It's a beautiful place, but the poeple are dislikeable.

Quote:
If you mean 'sensible' as 'sensitive' (which you might not, certainly), why's that a 'curse'?
Actually, sensitive is the right word. It might be a curse because of the ideal of 'strong and virile man' that the Western society has created.

Quote:
I love Russian, too, and yes, that's my main language. And the only one, actually, if you won't count that scant amount of English and the even scantier Lithuanian I fumble with. I was born in USSR, and my father's Russian. Lithuania is only a territory where my parents have met, accidentially, and I'm proud to say I have nothing to do with Lithuanians at all. I don't have a native country, like most of my friends.
Do you know Russian language?
Really? Have you lived there all your life?

I'm obsessed with Russia and the Soviet Union, the history, language, music (Bulat Okudzhava is one of my favourite artists); everything is beautiful about it. It's nice to know someone which has to do with it.

As for the language, I once began studying it some time ago, but I had to stop for a while.
I am planning on doing a more intensive course on the language next year, which is far better than studying from text books alone.

Quote:
That's because you loose your time reading all that scientific nonsense, amigo. We, the frightful and mighty potter-fans, make science of nonsense, on the other hand.
I like Mark Twain a lot, amongst other non-scientific writers, if that helps.

Quote:
What would you call a person who knows that politics needs to exist, but all the same considers it downright wrong? You may call me Charie, or VIP, as in Very Ignorant Politically. Like Count Almaviva said, can't do anything about it, so I just have to stand it.
That's a normal thing; I used to think the same (it's this game that changed it all for me, believe it or not).
But you are not indifferent to it, politics will always affect everyone, unluckily.

Quote:
He did say that? 0.0 Everyone tells me Bush is a real jerk, to put it lightly. My father visited me yesterday and we talked about Iraq, among other things, a bit. Do I understand it right that Americans went to Iraq for oil? If so, did they get it, eventually?
Apparently; but if it's true (that he said it, I mean), I'm sure he doesn't believe it, it's just for propaganda.
I'm discussing the issue constantly, with my father and everyone; but talking about it in a forum full of people from the USA is not a good move.

Quote:
Mother's choice, of course. I don't get it how it could be anyone else's buisness. Besides, is my guess right and most of anti-abortion fellows are men?
Also, I don't see it as murder. Murder is a kill of a human, isn't it? And a three-months fetal doesn't sound like a human to me. Not yet. If I remember biology, a human fetal shares quite a few traits with many other spieces' fetal forms.
But I don't understand motherhood (or biology) that well, thus I may sound cynical.
It's mainly men who are against it. I think they are afraid to give so much power to a woman.
Those who stand against always use the "It's murder" lie, when it scientifically isn't.
I'd respect the opposition more if they actually told the truth. (I'm for it, in case I didn't make that clear).

Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
Out of interest, how is history taught wrong?
Only a part of history is taught. You will probably learn about Greece, Egypt, Rome, the French Revolution, Industrial Rev, Russian Rev., World Wars and the history of your country. All in detail. But they miss many things.

I made a bet with my father that if I asked anybody in the street about the Mauryan Empire, they wouldn't know what I was talking about. Indeed, five people proved I was right.

I think that as much history should be seen as possible, but without much detail. The student can then choose the subject of his interest.

Quote:
-History is a subject which could be taught the wrongest way possible at school in a country with prejudiced goverment.
[...]
Re-writing History to accomodate current powers in control is too usual a thing, sadly.

-I remember my previous History teacher who would throw all kinds of anti-Russian garbage at us in class while conviniently forgetting to tell about the bad things we did.
That is very true.
My civics teacher was constantly saying anti-Communist (and any sort of Left-wing enterprise, actually) things. Once she started to talk nonsense about Cuba and Russia, so I got fed up and stood up to her; a heated argument unleashed after that.

Some teachers can be very biased, and that becomes a problem for students.

Quote:
Are there a lot of private investigators over there? Is it a profitable profession? What kind of jobs do you expect to get? As you can guess, this is a profession I only know from movies and don't know a thing about its realitites.
The agency I went to has a lot of students per year.
Lawyers or insurance companies mostly hire them; there are several fields in it but it depends on which aspect of it you choose to follow. I heard it pays well, but that is not something I really care for and the fares are up to the agent.

I like it as an option to have a job while I am at University, even though it requires a lot of hard work. Once I finish Forensics, I can merge both of the professions.

Quote:
Heh, I'm going to become a teacher and teach kids how to speak English and German. It's not really what I want to do, but I want to work with languages, it's a relatively respected and well paid profession with weekends, Christmas, summer, Easter etc. always off duty so, it's worth it.
I think it suits you. You are a very nice person, and you seem to be very good at languages. I'm sure kids will love you.
Have you began to work/study for it already?

Languages are a beautiful thing; it is such a bad thing that some are being lost with the years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
A beautiful alphabet? That's a newsflash. What's so beautiful about it? *perplexed*
I agree with Naomi, cyrillic is a great alphabet. One of the many reasons why I like this language, actually.


Also, I am going out of town, so I won't be able to be as active. I Promise I'll log in at least once every three days. (I'm not going right away, so I still have some chances to post today).

Last edited by El Virus; 12-30-2005 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 12-30-2005, 01:02 PM   #148
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<...>; for what I've heard, in other countries they are more expensive. There is always the option of those very-expensive schools, but they are full of snobs and are not worth it.
I see. Here, 'a private school' means exactly 'a very expensive and full of snobs' kind of thing, mainly.

Quote:
He sure sounds like a nice person.
I have a literature and plastic arts teacher I really care for.
He was, indeed. And really handsome. And married. Allah sees I'd recieved too many laments on that little fact from my friend.
What's 'plastic arts'? Dances? We didn't have that at all.

Quote:
What sort of Arts were you interested in?
'Were'. What a correct and eternally painful way to put it.
Graphics. Always Graphics - or is it called 'drawing' in English? They say, 'Drawing's father, painting's mother'. I've always preferred father.

Quote:
Anyway, the women I tend to encounter are not 'my type' (or vice versa).
Really? And do you know what is 'your type'? Oh, drop it. I realize our chance for a mind-blowing romance is throttled by too many drastic and insurmountable obstacles. Guess I need to search for a Price somewhere else. And not THAT clever, by the way.

Quote:
It's a beautiful place, but the people are dislikeable.
Argentina... Yes, that sounds distant and romantic. Music, dances, gaucho sauce, far away, vast lands. Why do you call people dislikeable? The worst national character I've met so far were Lithuanians.

Quote:
It might be a curse because of the ideal of 'strong and virile man' that the Western society has created.
Feel pressed to stand up to the stereotype? People should probably remind themselves, from time to time, that men are also humans.

Quote:
Really? Have you lived there all your life?
I'm obsessed with Russia and the Soviet Union, the history, language, music (Bulat Okudzhava is one of my favourite artists); everything is beautiful about it. It's nice to know someone which has to do with it.
I was born in Vilnius, and yes, I've lived here all my life. Sometimes I go to Israel, and once was in Saint-Petersburg, briefly. Real Russians are fascinating; though I don't think I could live among them. They are so - so different. They talk differently and think even more so. I'm dreaming of visiting Moskow some time.
Bulat Okudzhava. Uhuh. And why am I not surprised that you know more about Russian culture than I do? I just love Bards, I don't distinguish who's who there. I love to listen to "Песни Нашего Века" albums, and that's all.

Quote:
I like Mark Twain a lot, amongst other non-scientific writers, if that helps.
Hey, I didn't imply anything by that comment of mine. I like Mark Twain too, by the way, not that I've read him a lot. Mostly re-read the same titles.

Quote:
But you are not indifferent to it, politics will always affect everyone, unluckily.
Well, materially, it does, but so far I haven't noticed. ...Or it's just that I don't think of myself as Lithuanian, so it sort of doesn't matter to me what actually happens here. I've just thought that if I lived in my beloved Israel I'd definitely take much interest in ongoing events.

Quote:
I'm discussing the issue constantly, with my father and everyone; but talking about it in a forum full of people from the USA is not a good move.
That may be. Though I'm anyway not somebody to discuss it with, the best I can do is listen.

Quote:
It's mainly men who are against it. I think they are afraid to give so much power to a woman.
And what sort of power would that be, pray tell? Now I'm really confused as to why abortion is a problem at all. There are far too many people on this planet in any case.
Those men who are against, they should first try to bear and raise a child themselves, if they're so smart.

Quote:
I made a bet with my father that if I asked anybody in the street about the Mauryan Empire, they wouldn't know what I was talking about. Indeed, five people proved I was right.
I think that as much history should be seen as possible, but without much detail. The student can then choose the subject of his interest.
Charming; another example of the thing you know and I haven't even heared about, at least it has never caught my eye even if I've seen some reference. Not that it's not my fault, of course. I wonder if our school historian mentioned it - I've actually listened to him only for a couple of years from those five he taught our class. And don't remember even that.
Perhaps your idea of presenting history to students is passable - for those interested. I guess that's basicly the way they teach it at Universities. Bored with studies ignorant fools, like me, wouldn't read anything additional at all, I suppose. They are too busy rereading 'Les Trois Mousquetaires' for the hundredth time.

Quote:
My civics teacher was constantly saying anti-Communist (and any sort of Left-wing enterprise, actually) things. Once she started to talk nonsense about Cuba and Russia, so I got fed up and stood up to her; a heated argument unleashed after that.
A pity I could see (and wouldn't have understood) that. Heated student/teacher arguments, where the student is right, especially, are amazing to observe. What did you win eventually?

Quote:
Also, I am going out of town, so I won't be able to be as active.
I'm actaully astonished at your and VampireNaomi's current forum activity. Where the hell do you get the time? I'm completely free at the moment, but I'm sure I won't have this much spare time later, I don't know even where I'm going to live during upcoming months - so I definitely won't be present frequenty either.


________________________________________
I'm sorry for everything stupid and offensive I've said above. I can't play a clever girl constantly.
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Old 12-30-2005, 10:27 PM   #149
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I didn't get to reply to everything earlier, so I'll do it now. A bit concisely, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
He was, indeed. And really handsome. And married. Allah sees I'd recieved too many laments on that little fact from my friend.
What's 'plastic arts'? Dances? We didn't have that at all.
Plastic Arts refer to the subject in which we learn to draw, paint, sculpt, and all of those visual things.

Quote:
'Were'. What a correct and eternally painful way to put it.
Graphics. Always Graphics - or is it called 'drawing' in English? They say, 'Drawing's father, painting's mother'. I've always preferred father.
If you don't mind, how come you had to leave it?

Quote:
Really? And do you know what is 'your type'? Oh, drop it. I realize our chance for a mind-blowing romance is throttled by too many drastic and insurmountable obstacles. Guess I need to search for a Price somewhere else. And not THAT clever, by the way.
What sort of drastic and insurmountable obstacles throttle our chance for a mind-blowing romance?

It's not as easy to figure out what is your type, as it is to figure what isn't. I guess one finds that out on the appropiate moment.

Quote:
Argentina... Yes, that sounds distant and romantic. Music, dances, gaucho sauce, far away, vast lands. Why do you call people dislikeable? The worst national character I've met so far were Lithuanians.
If there is one thing I like from here, it has to be Tango. It's just one of the greatest dances and music out there.

Most people in here think to much of themselves; they consider themselves better than the rest of South America; instead of trying to work together for the sake of progress, we just criticize.

What's wrong with Lithuanians?

Quote:
Feel pressed to stand up to the stereotype? People should probably remind themselves, from time to time, that men are also humans.
Not at all; but those which form part of the stereotype seem to be bothered by it.

Quote:
Bulat Okudzhava. Uhuh. And why am I not surprised that you know more about Russian culture than I do? I just love Bards, I don't distinguish who's who there. I love to listen to "Песни Нашего Века" albums, and that's all.
Bards are incredible, but no song can compare to the excellence of Ваше Благородие or the beauty of Песенка об Арбате. I like these two so much that I even learnt them on guitar, they are not exactly easy to tab; but they are outstanding.

Quote:
Hey, I didn't imply anything by that comment of mine. I like Mark Twain too, by the way, not that I've read him a lot. Mostly re-read the same titles.
I've read his short stories several times; I certainly like the evolution he went through along his writing years.
Which titles do you keep re-reading?

Quote:
I've just thought that if I lived in my beloved Israel I'd definitely take much interest in ongoing events.
Do you prefer Israel to Lithuania or any other place?

Quote:
And what sort of power would that be, pray tell? Now I'm really confused as to why abortion is a problem at all. There are far too many people on this planet in any case.
Those men who are against, they should first try to bear and raise a child themselves, if they're so smart.
The power of choosing whether a baby comes to this world or not. A lot of men like the idea of a woman being submitted, and due to the current almost equality between both, they now feel threatened. The only thing they have left is that a woman must carry a creature for nine months, and then take care of it; while they have to do nothing. If they loose this privilege, it's all over for their Chauvinistic beliefs.

Quote:
Charming; another example of the thing you know and I haven't even heared about, at least it has never caught my eye even if I've seen some reference.
[...]
They are too busy rereading 'Les Trois Mousquetaires' for the hundredth time
It's not something entirely important to humanity either; I just picked it that once because of it's 'low profile'.

Did you have a crush on your history teacher too? .

Quote:
[on debating with my teacher] What did you win eventually?
Being catalogued as a Communist (which doesn't bother me; but I'm not one) and having to work double to get the mark I really deserve with that teacher.

Well, yay for speaking my mind in class, I guess.

Quote:
I'm actaully astonished at your and VampireNaomi's current forum activity. Where the hell do you get the time? I'm completely free at the moment, but I'm sure I won't have this much spare time later, I don't know even where I'm going to live during upcoming months - so I definitely won't be present frequenty either.
I'm on vacation, so I have no problem activity-wise (now, I will have). But during the school year, I don't have much time left.
Now VampireNaomi is the most loyal Grim Fandango fan I know of.

Quote:
I'm sorry for everything stupid and offensive I've said above. I can't play a clever girl constantly.
It didn't sound offensive; all of what you say sounds rational enough for me. I'm starting to believe that you don't think much of yourself, either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
How long do you have to keep studying there until you can move elsewhere?
Only a couple of years to go, only a couple of years!

Quote:
That poor teacher. My Brazilian friend told me that public schools have such problems in that part of the world, but I never suspected it could be that bad for the teachers.
It is, I think teachers are underpaid mostly everywhere.
And on a world where unfortunately the importance of your job is valued by the money you make (not that it is fair; businessmen are filthily rich and their work is worthless) that is not a good way to thank them for their hard work.

Quote:
True. We're somewhere on the top of the suicide list. I think it's because people have forgotten the meaning of really caring about each other. Our society sets firm rules; you have to be young, beautiful and successful if you want to be worth anything. If you fail to accomplish that you've failed in life.
The firm rules of society are something I'll never like. They are the catalysts of many things, like suicides, anorexia, etc.

What a screwed up place we live in.

Quote:
Give a shout if you do. I'll give you a tour in The Spy Museum
Swell.

I'll sure do; that place looks neat.

About the Lenin museum, I was talking about the one on the Red Square; but anything will do .

Last edited by El Virus; 12-30-2005 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 12-31-2005, 02:12 AM   #150
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To answer 'a bit concisely' is not a bad thing among all these conversational giants. However, conciseness is not my talent's sister.

Quote:
If you don't mind, how come you had to leave it?
I don't mind (though I wonder whether that's a good sign or bad). You see, I have left not only that, I've left all my life overboard at some point: school (I have a school-leaving certificate, but virtually I didn't attent it in my supposed last year, and didn't take exams - I was officially exused from them), preparatory arts school, friends, relations and everything else. I don't think I wasn't helped profoundly to abandon it all, but I certainly should have done something, should have resisted... Right. I know I couldn't have done anything differently.
It's just sort of hard to switch from the perfectly organized, happy ordinary life to a complete wreck of it.

Quote:
What sort of drastic and insurmountable obstacles throttle our chance for a mind-blowing romance?
It's not as easy to figure out what is your type, as it is to figure what isn't.
Yes, that's true. So far I've only met 'not my types' either. Well, I'm an 'unseasoned pear', as mother calls it, I don't have the slightest idea what should be.
Obstacles? For one, I'm not actually a 'mind-blowing romance' sort of person. At least I don't think I am. And you wouldn't like me: I'm plump, with green complexion and an awful Don-Copal temperment (*scared to read this myself*), and I sing all the time despite the fact that I've no voice. Oh, and there's the ocean.
Heartbreaking, isn't it?

Quote:
If there is one thing I like from here, it has to be Tango. It's just one of the greatest dances and music out there.<...>
What's wrong with Lithuanians?
Tango is loved all around the world. I think dances overall are great, when I see people dancing beautifully, flawlessly, well - just dancing, I feel sad about my total lack of aptitude for it. Can you dance? Tango? I guess you can.

Lithuanian national character is nothing admirable. Petty, greedy and grave, with little interest in anything but practical mundane routines, and not welcoming in the scantiest. Narrow-minded. Of course, there are kind, nice, friendly and open-hearted Lithuanians, but those are more an exception to the common rule; I somehow don't consider them Lithuanians at all.

Quote:
Bards are incredible, but no song can compare to the excellence of Ваше Благородие or the beauty of Песенка об Арбате.
*didn't find "Песенку об Арбате" on the hard-drive, hurriedly searched the Internet for it* I wonder what's so astounding about these two songs for you. My friends and me were constantly singing "Ваше Благородие" when kids, among other popular songs from movies. I can't think of this song without remembering Sukhov and Sayid and others.
'Arbat' - yes, it's amazing. Can't help but think of my fathers complaints that, 'nooo, Arbat's different now, it's irretrievably lost in the past'. Sometimes I so much long to visit the country I was born in, to find out myself what were the people's relationships like in Soviet Union. If they were anything like in the movies, then... Not that I have the chance, anyway. It's all so strange.

Quote:
Which titles do you keep re-reading?
I do not keep re-reading, I re-read from time to time, mostly because I never memorize a thing from what I read. So, I have re-read three-four times the same books I've read as a kid: Yankee in King Arthur's Court, The Prince and the Pauper, Tom Sowyer and Huckleberry Finn (Huckleberry Finn mostly, actually). I've read some short stories, but - as usually - I don't recall anything.
To re-read three-four times is normal for me concerning almost every book, you know. Doesn't apply to my favourites, though - due to the superstition (about not getting all the meaning if lightly approached, and all that).

Quote:
Do you prefer Israel to Lithuania or any other place?
I've never been to any other places, remember?
In Israel I instantly feel at home. You just wander around and sense that those people are your people, and a sweet and a bit rotten air, and sand and night. Mother says it's because of all the friends and relatives we have there; I disagree. Those are her friends and relatives, mostly, though I most certainly have some best people there as well. It's the country, it's spirit, and funny natives: lazy foxes and concerned vacants.
Lithuania has beautiful nature, though. There's no place better than Neringa. If I lived in Neringa, I most definitely wouldn't want to move elsewhere. But I don't think I'll ever live there; besides, Neringa's beauty is in the excess of wild nature and the lack of highly unnecessary people. I want it never populated more than it's now.

Quote:
Did you have a crush on your history teacher too?
No! Ai-yai, how could you even think that of me. I haven't had a crush on anyone, well, maybe save for unserious over-admiration for a couple of girls.
That historian, Andrei Evgenievich, had already been teaching our class for two years (and I didn't pay any attention to un-favourite subject and it's teacher), when that friend of mine sat with me on that lesson. And since then, she had started filling me in on every little detail concerning our historian: age, address, family, costumes, facial features and so on and so on. You can imagine my suffering. But there was also an unexpected positive effect of my friend's fantasies me: I had actually started to pay attention, to see myself what's so adorable about historian. And the amazing revelation I'd made was an incomprehensible epiphany that 'history can be interesting!' When lectured like Adrei Evgenievich did, at least. So, after that I'd eagerly studied history until 'the disaster struck'.
By the way, that friend of mine didn't value his teaching methods at all. Stupid. All she cared about was a pretty face (not that it wasn't). We had many rows over that.

Quote:
Now VampireNaomi is the most loyal Grim Fandango fan I know of.
Seems so. Ramarkable.

Quote:
It didn't sound offensive; all of what you say sounds rational enough for me. I'm starting to believe that you don't think much of yourself, either.
I have my reasons. Well, everything about me is either too much or too little. It's terrible.
As for yesterday - I guess I was excessively doubtful due to tiredness and worries about today. I still don't know how will I spend the New Year celebration. Most probably there won't be any celebration for me at all, but it still may be lunch with my father, or - - I'd prefer to know in advance.

Quote:
What a screwed up place we live in.
Ditto, mon cher ami.
Let's pick and relish those scant diamonds in the dust our sorrowful ways cautiously present to us even on the darkest days of our lifes. Mes enfants.
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Old 12-31-2005, 04:07 AM   #151
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El Virus, before I forget I must ask what kind of relationship Argentinians have with Brazilians. My friend told me that the two nations are pretty much at war over football.

Quote:
Now VampireNaomi is the most loyal Grim Fandango fan I know of.
No, I'm not. There are a lot more dedicated people around here. Having Christmas holidays and no social life whatsoever gives me the chance to hang around here.

Quote:
About the Lenin museum, I was talking about the one on the Red Square; but anything will do
Well, it's not much of a distance. Remember to visit St. Petersburg (you must see The Winter Palace).

I don't want to sound like I'm sticking my nose to other people's business, but the obstacles you mentioned, Charie, can be overcome. I mean, my mum is pretty much like you described yourself and yet dad married him. Besides, Virus doesn't sound like a particularly petty person.

</matchmaker>


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-31-2005, 07:03 AM   #152
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Quote:
the obstacles you mentioned, Charie, can be overcome.
Well, thank you for believing in our chance. Besides, today I've actually left house, made a bit new haircut (I don't have anybody to show it but the mirror, though), and with a touch of cosmetics - I thought I'm beautiful. As in, not that frightening at all.
But you mustn't forget the most horrible impediment, which I, by some accident, have failed to mention above: the unforgivable age difference. Let's face the fact: I'm too old for the boy.

...Hey, boy? Don't take offence.
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Old 12-31-2005, 07:10 AM   #153
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Wow, there must be be something horribly wrong with me today. When I look at the profiles of the two of you I see that the age difference is about a year. That's hardly a problem. What am I not getting?


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 12-31-2005, 07:33 AM   #154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
I don't mind (though I wonder whether that's a good sign or bad). You see, I have left not only that, I've left all my life overboard at some point: school (I have a school-leaving certificate, but virtually I didn't attent it in my supposed last year, and didn't take exams - I was officially exused from them), preparatory arts school, friends, relations and everything else. I don't think I wasn't helped profoundly to abandon it all, but I certainly should have done something, should have resisted... Right. I know I couldn't have done anything differently.
It's just sort of hard to switch from the perfectly organized, happy ordinary life to a complete wreck of it.
Was there a reason for you to do it?

I think about leaving everything every once in a while; unfortunately, I then need to come back to my monotonous reality.

Quote:
Yes, that's true. So far I've only met 'not my types' either. Well, I'm an 'unseasoned pear', as mother calls it, I don't have the slightest idea what should be.
Obstacles? For one, I'm not actually a 'mind-blowing romance' sort of person. At least I don't think I am. And you wouldn't like me: I'm plump, with green complexion and an awful Don-Copal temperment (*scared to read this myself*), and I sing all the time despite the fact that I've no voice. Oh, and there's the ocean.
Heartbreaking, isn't it?
Nah.

I'm thin, with white complexion(?), moody & insecure. I spend time playing the guitar and harmonica, despite not being so good at it :P.

What about the ocean?

Quote:
Tango is loved all around the world. I think dances overall are great, when I see people dancing beautifully, flawlessly, well - just dancing, I feel sad about my total lack of aptitude for it. Can you dance? Tango? I guess you can.
No I can't dance. I've been repeatedly asked if I can (must be the shoes), though.

Quote:
Lithuanian national character is nothing admirable. Petty, greedy and grave, with little interest in anything but practical mundane routines, and not welcoming in the scantiest. Narrow-minded. Of course, there are kind, nice, friendly and open-hearted Lithuanians, but those are more an exception to the common rule; I somehow don't consider them Lithuanians at all.
With that you've described about 82% of the world.

Quote:
I wonder what's so astounding about these two songs for you. My friends and me were constantly singing "Ваше Благородие" when kids, among other popular songs from movies. I can't think of this song without remembering Sukhov and Sayid and others.
The nice lyrics, the great music and the fact that "Vashe..." comes from "White Sun of the Desert" a great Soviet movie. The other one...no idea, it sounds really nice to me.

Quote:
No! Ai-yai, how could you even think that of me. I haven't had a crush on anyone, well, maybe save for unserious over-admiration for a couple of girls.
Well, the way in which you talk about him helps, in a way.

Quote:
I have my reasons. Well, everything about me is either too much or too little. It's terrible.
As for yesterday - I guess I was excessively doubtful due to tiredness and worries about today. I still don't know how will I spend the New Year celebration. Most probably there won't be any celebration for me at all, but it still may be lunch with my father, or - - I'd prefer to know in advance.

Oh yeah, it's New Year today/tomorrow.
I guess I'll spend the day inside a car only to arrive at night into a small town.

Quote:
Ditto, mon cher ami.
Let's pick and relish those scant diamonds in the dust our sorrowful ways cautiously present to us even on the darkest days of our lifes. Mes enfants.
Well said. o_O.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
El Virus, before I forget I must ask what kind of relationship Argentinians have with Brazilians. My friend told me that the two nations are pretty much at war over football.
Football, don't talk to me about it. I'm fed up with it; everyone in this country seems to be obsessed with team sports, especially that one. All you hear, is football; no current events, no art.

But over all, the relationship is messed up; there is too much rivalry between South Americans.
I don't consider myself a typical one, so I have no prejudice against them.

But things are worse with Chile.

Quote:
No, I'm not. There are a lot more dedicated people around here. Having Christmas holidays and no social life whatsoever gives me the chance to hang around here.
Name three, and I'll believe you.

Quote:
Well, it's not much of a distance. Remember to visit St. Petersburg (you must see The Winter Palace).
Indeed, I will.
I still don't know when and how (but most probably next December and by train).
I'll mail you, if I ever need you or your help.

Quote:
Let's face the facts: I'm too old for the boy.

...Hey, boy? Don't take offence.
Who gives a damn about age?

Argh, I'm not going to keep pushing this.
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Old 12-31-2005, 08:15 AM   #155
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Quote:
Name three, and I'll believe you.
James, who runs the DOD and finds the inspiration to update it regularly, Rei Nokato who not only writes good fanfiction but also runs the GF fan art club and we can't forget Thrik and his site.

Quote:
I'll mail you, if I ever need you or your help.
Don't bother, I doubt I know anything you don't already know.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 01-01-2006, 01:17 PM   #156
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I've started writing this answer yesterday, but then the New Year had occured, with my father dropping in and staying till the morning (we were representing some sort of the 'two lost souls in an alliance', I suppose; both having nowhere to go and nobody else to spend the celebration night with), and after that I had a huge cleaning-of-the-flat marathon, and a nice looong bath, and a re-whatching of Vabank, and completely scrambled from the lack of sleep brains. So, I'm going to copy-paste most of the following from a saved file with a message I didn't get the chance to submit earlier.
Bear in mind, though, that my curret strenuous task is not to fall asleep on the keyboard practically at any minute.


VampireNaomi
Quote:
When I look at the profiles of the two of you I see that the age difference is about a year. That's hardly a problem. What am I not getting?
That it's almost two yers, actually. Just imagine: when he was a naive innocent newborn, I was already a self-righteous cantankerous little bastard, refusing to share anything with anybody and knowingly manipulating unsuspecting parents.

Quote:
<about El Virus>I doubt I know anything you don't already know.
That's the trouble with him, isn't it?

El Virus
Quote:
Was there a reason for you to do it?
I think about leaving everything every once in a while; unfortunately, I then need to come back to my monotonous reality.
I didn't say I wanted it, or had much choice. It was not about 'leaving everything' but breaking down myself and abandoning the world of the living as a result. Out of shame, weariness, corrupted state of mind. Very corrupted. I hadn't been able to think straight for more than a year. Actually, it was only during that period of time when I'd pondered every once in a while as to what it might be like to 'fly away' - because I had nothing but wreckage and garbage to leave behind, then.
So, as I've said above, it was a breakdown: of my will, perception, sensibility, me. I've lived as a plant (*and it was as terrible as it sounds*). Not that I really live a normal human life at the present time, but at least it's not as insentient as before.

Quote:
I'm thin, with white complexion(?), moody & insecure. I spend time playing the guitar and harmonica, despite not being so good at it :P.
What about the ocean?
<...>
Argh, I'm not going to keep pushing this.
The thing about the ocean is that it is big.
Or else we could look mutually complementary individuals. *right now, though, I can't help but wonder how a person may desire anything other than a good slumber; that's unfathomable*
And I didn't know you were pushing; that's alluring. It's such a distress that I live in this village of a country, when there's a hot Argentinian senorito with a most appealing proposal and serious intentions out there. That's what I detest about the Internet, you know: once you find a true love of your life, you also oftenly find out, as a special bonus, that he or she lives on the opposite side of the Earth.

Quote:
No I can't dance. I've been repeatedly asked if I can (must be the shoes), though.
Must be origin. Argentinians must dance; what sort of Argentinians are they, otherwise?
By the way, is your origin solely... Argentinian or whatever? I mean, by blood. I mused whether you have some other relation to Russian culture except the pure interest, for example. However, I guess it's safe to assume you take great interest in a vast selection of subjects.

Quote:
With that you've described about 82% of the world.
I see you don't have much faith in humanity.
I was talking about a national character. Russians are very open, for example; even when somebody does bad things, you feel it comes straight from his heart. Isrealians are careless-carefree, and cantankerous. Lithuanians are unwelcoming and reserved. I haven't socialised with other countries' denizens.
These were inane opinions of mine, you realize.

Quote:
The nice lyrics, the great music, <...>
From "Песни Нашего Века" four albums I possess (the first one of which includes "Ваше Благородие", by the way) I happen to favour the 'In the memory of Francois Rabelais' song quite a lot, for some reason.
But I'm not really much into music, on the whole. From Russian tunes I usually listen to a couple of brilliant children's radio-plays I have in mp3, or sing children songs myself. "Прекрасное далёко" and "Крылатые качели" are on the top of my singing list (if you'd be brave enough to call my shrieks 'singing', surely). I suppose you know those.

Quote:
Well, the way in which you talk about [your historian] helps, in a way.
*suspicious* Helps with what, exactly? I talk about him in a way he deserves, in my view. There're quite a lot of people I know and admire that I could talk volumes about.

-----------------------------------------------
A listless mention: you know, I've asked a couple of people yesterday that question of yours about Mauryan Empire. One asked me back whether that has something to do with New Zealand (those where some 'Maori', I reckon), and the other retorted as to why would anybody care.
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Old 01-01-2006, 06:20 PM   #157
El Virus
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There will be spelling mistakes. But thank the keyboard, time, lack of a word processor and my tiresome.

Quote:
James, who runs the DOD and finds the inspiration to update it regularly, Rei Nokato who not only writes good fanfiction but also runs the GF fan art club and we can't forget Thrik and his site.
Ohay, but you are still a more loyal fan than me.

Talking about Rei Nokato, will he ever come back to the forums?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
Bear in mind, though, that my curret strenuous task is not to fall asleep on the keyboard practically at any minute.
That pretty much describes my current state aof mind. I'm on a humid cyber cafe (you know, where you rent a computer for an ever-increasing fare); full of people I couldn't care less to know, fighting with the keybord which is practically broken (and keeps including the letter 'a', without a clear reason [If you spot an unwanted letter, it's because of that]).

Sounds like you had fun yesterday. All I did was walk around the woods at midnight while the fireworks were going in the background (I'm not at BA, and I won't be there for a while; by the way).

Quote:
That it's almost two yers, actually. Just imagine: when he was a naive innocent newborn, I was already a self-righteous cantankerous little bastard, refusing to share anything with anybody and knowingly manipulating unsuspecting parents.
All kids and babies are self-righteous bastards.
But age is a relative thing, one could argue that it's only purpose is making people wonder about their deaths.

Quote:
-I doubt I know anything you don't already know.

-That's the trouble with him, isn't it?
By saying such things you inflate(?) my ego, so I begin to think I can take over the world, next reality strikes me and makes me realise I'm an idiot.

Quote:
So, as I've said above, it was a breakdown: of my will, perception, sensibility, me. I've lived as a plant (*and it was as terrible as it sounds*). Not that I really live a normal human life at the present time, but at least it's not as insentient as before.
As long as you don't regret it, I guess that it's a right move.

Having a normal life is not as good as it sounds. What I would give to know how living amongst a strange family is...

For once I would love to act according to my emotions instead of my logic. Just improvise and make something impulsively; you know.

Quote:
The thing about the ocean is that it is big.
Oh yeah, THAT Ocean.

Not that big a problem with this globalised world of ours.

Quote:
*right now, though, I can't help but wonder how a person may desire anything other than a good slumber; that's unfathomable*
For some reason, I hate to sleep (but give in as soon as I'm exhausted); I consider it to be a waste of time. There's that little biological fact that makes it impossible not to, though.

Quote:
And I didn't know you were pushing; that's alluring. It's such a distress that I live in this village of a country, when there's a hot Argentinian senorito with a most appealing proposal and serious intentions out there. That's what I detest about the Internet, you know: once you find a true love of your life, you also oftenly find out, as a special bonus, that he or she lives on the opposite side of the Earth.
[I should include a compliment and complain about my city too, but I'm uninspired to write something nice]

Ironically, the internet allows you to meet that kind of people.

But, yeah, it does become a problem.

Quote:
Must be origin. Argentinians must dance; what sort of Argentinians are they, otherwise?
If I had the time to juggle school, Russian, guitar, reading and other activities, I'd definitely learn how to dance it.

Unlickly, the current stereotype is "Argentine people must play football the right way" (which I don't anyway).

Quote:
By the way, is your origin solely... Argentinian or whatever? I mean, by blood. I mused whether you have some other relation to Russian culture except the pure interest, for example. However, I guess it's safe to assume you take great interest in a vast selection of subjects.
Half Italian, a quarter German and the rest a mixture of nationalities I haven't digged up yet.

Unfortunately I've got no Russian blood. But my aunt's husband (my uncle, technically), both of whom I like a lot, comes from that country.

But my interest comes from the propaganda my father would give me as a child, and my grandfather was very fond of the Soviet Union, despite it's reputation, so does my aunt; as you might see, it runs in the family.

You got it right there, I am curious about a vast amount of things; damn I've
even heard the history of the burial methods and toilets but that has more to do with my free time.

Quote:
I see you don't have much faith in humanity.
It's more of a crusade against comformism.

Quote:
I was talking about a national character. Russians are very open, for example; even when somebody does bad things, you feel it comes straight from his heart. Isrealians are careless-carefree, and cantankerous. Lithuanians are unwelcoming and reserved. I haven't socialised with other countries' denizens.
People in here are open and close, too close. Due to my tendency of not looking at people in the eyes, and un-desire to kiss everyone on the cheek, I am usually frowned at.

Quote:
I suppose you know those.
Actually I don't. Due to the lack of imports getting music made in the Soviet Union is practically impossible. Getting things by Okudzhava was a sacrifice.

Quote:
*suspicious* Helps with what, exactly? I talk about him in a way he deserves, in my view. There're quite a lot of people I know and admire that I could talk volumes about.
I know, I was just giving a reason to my comment.

Quote:
A listless mention: you know, I've asked a couple of people yesterday that question of yours about Mauryan Empire. One asked me back whether that has something to do with New Zealand (those where some 'Maori', I reckon), and the other retorted as to why would anybody care.
The latter is the most common answer. That absent-minded and unprofound Nihilism is killing society.

If you must know, it was the first major empire of India (From around 200 BCE (before Common Era; not sure about it's abbreviation), and an important thing in that culture.
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Old 01-02-2006, 01:24 AM   #158
VampireNaomi
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Quote:
Talking about Rei Nokato, will he ever come back to the forums?
She. And I don't know. I think she visits from time to time, but has no intent of being regular.


"Oho, my sainted aunt, have I become a victim of brain fever, the curse of academia...?" -- Jonathan Crane

Sweet As Mango: Nick/Olivia all the way!
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Old 01-02-2006, 04:52 AM   #159
Charie
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Posts: 130
El Virus
Quote:
Sounds like you had fun yesterday. All I did was walk around the woods at midnight while the fireworks were going in the background
If only I've had fun; your New Year sounds much more enticing to me. I would have been much happier if I didn't celebrate it at all. Besides, I hate going out of my time-table, even rarely.
I consider sleep a waste of time as well, and would be glad to get rid of this - unfortunately - necessary nuisance for good, but I need to sleep around 7.45 hours a day to function appropriately. The longest I've ever been awake were four days, after which not even walking could save me anymore: I would just faint asleep on the move.

Quote:
By saying such things you inflate(?) my ego
Oh, no; we're just being modest and self-criticizing. *shuffle*

Quote:
As long as you don't regret it, I guess that it's a right move.
Having a normal life is not as good as it sounds. What I would give to know how living amongst a strange family is...
I beg your pardon, don't regret what? In the whole situation there was nothing even remotely reminiscent of conscious 'moves', it was more like being taken away by a too fast, wide and deep river, lost every hope for a salvation and thus stopped struggling. I can't feel regret for what I regard as inevitable accidents, though I can abominate them, and so I do.
Normal life is a beautiful and craved for thing, when you have less than that. However, at the present moment I can't see any normality for myself; everything had been a bit too crooked around me in the past - in my view.

I would have liked to grow up and live in a perfectly normal, healthy real family. Not that my actual one is something outstanding, of course: they were two sincerely despising each other people with the notehead in passports, who had finally split up officially a a year and a half ago. Happens all the time. They had already been only tolerating one another by the time I was born; notwithstanding, they both wanted me, just separately.

Quote:
For once I would love to act according to my emotions instead of my logic. Just improvise and make something impulsively; you know.
Do you mean you never actually act according to emotions? That would be impossible for me. I don't think I'm downright thick-headed, but mostly I do whatever I feel like doing at the very moment - spontaneously. Strange how sometimes I finally understand all the logical reasons underlying my actions only years after the actual event, and find that I would have chosen the same option if I were thinking at the time.
And, sometimes, I also like to act recklessly, deliberately abandoning conscious mind, because it is... interesting. As inebriated Ippolit in the "Ирония судьбы, или С лёгким паром!" movie had complained, 'We live boringly! We lack adventurism! We've forgotten how to climb in through our beloved women's windows. We've forgotten how to do big, nice fooleries!' Entirely true; there should be more captain Greys under the scarlet sails around us.
Don't you ever do such things? I would think you do.

Quote:
[I should include a compliment and complain about my city too, but I'm uninspired to write something nice]
Ironically, the internet allows you to meet that kind of people. But, yeah, [living very far away from one another] does become a problem.
[I can commiserate that. You may think up my ablush answer to the imaginary compliment and condolences concerning your city.]
Rare cases of happy real-life marriages of the Internet couples keep gnawing at the back of my mind.

Quote:
Unlickly, the current stereotype is "Argentine people must play football the right way" (which I don't anyway).
Really? I don't know a thing about football, and have no desire whatsoever to fill this gap of knowledge. I'm strictly convinced that Quidditch's the best sport ever. It's very weird to find myself lost in the midst of vortexes of heated football discussions, names and titles flying over my head, sometimes. What could be so exciting about football?..

Quote:
Half Italian, a quarter German and the rest a mixture of nationalities I haven't digged up yet. Unfortunately I've got no Russian blood. But my aunt's husband (my uncle, technically), both of whom I like a lot, comes from that country.
Oh. What wind did bring you all together in Argentina?.. Unpredictable vicissitudes of fate, hm?
I'd got some 'propaganda' from my father as well, he's a very pro-Soviets person. Opinions on the country are oftenly so extreme. There's idealizing, berating, blame on some things or the other, praise or loathing. Easy to get lost, especially when the only actual thing you yourself remember about the USSR is the money substitution: rubles and kopecks giving way to lits and cents. I was three, I suppose, and needed money for bubble-gum.

I'm half Russian, a quarter Jewish and a quartrer Tatar, by the way.

Quote:
I've even heard the history of the burial methods and toilets but that has more to do with my free time.
History of toilets definitely sounds enticing. Shame I prefer to fill my free time with Harry Potter and other endlessly un-educative matters, denying myself a chance to learn about such topical subjects. Seriously.

Quote:
Due to my tendency of not looking at people in the eyes, and un-desire to kiss everyone on the cheek, I am usually frowned at.
Why, do they really do that all the time? Now that's something unheard of. To look somebody in the eyes is considered rude, or a sign of intimate trust, here. Or maybe extravagance. As for kissing non-relatives on cheek, I was kissed only once, by way of a thank-you, and still melt at the memory.
So, what you are saying is that antisocial elements like me would have been 'frowned at', too. Is that the feature of Argentina or the other SA countries as well?

Quote:
Actually I don't. Due to the lack of imports getting music made in the Soviet Union is practically impossible. Getting things by Okudzhava was a sacrifice.
And what did you sacrifice?
Then again, getting something special is always troublesome, one would think. Everything else, however, exists somewhere in the Internet. That's how we get most of the music nowadays, after all.
Those two songs I've mentioned, they are by far the most famous, both from children movies. Maybe you just don't remember the titles. Weird. I couldn't find those on my computer either. Well, I've still got the disk. Also: how about Seweryn Krajewski? Or... All right, I'm curious as to what else do you listen to, from Soviet Russian music. Inanely.

Quote:
The latter is the most common answer. That absent-minded and unprofound Nihilism is killing society.
Don't call ignorance Nihilism. Most people have many other things to worry about, things at hand. Besides, 'What the deuce is it to me? You say that we go round the sun. If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work,' - had said once by no means the dimmest mind in the world, remember?
*muses* I probably am a bit of a Nihilist too, for I consider myself Subjectivist.

Yep, I've looked up that Mauryans were in India. The only thing I've heard about India before was that it's every province had it's ruler, making India a patched-up country, plus jungles and an exceptionally serious approach to religion. Vague at best, I know.
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Old 01-02-2006, 01:37 PM   #160
El Virus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireNaomi
She.
Oh, I tend to mess those things up.

It's just that it is not a common name (Oh right, Rei Ayanami it all becomes clearer now).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charie
If only I've had fun; your New Year sounds much more enticing to me. I would have been much happier if I didn't celebrate it at all. Besides, I hate going out of my time-table, even rarely.
I'm not a big time celebrator either, It's just a new year for crisake.

Quote:
I consider sleep a waste of time as well, and would be glad to get rid of this - unfortunately - necessary nuisance for good, but I need to sleep around 7.45 hours a day to function appropriately. The longest I've ever been awake were four days, after which not even walking could save me anymore: I would just faint asleep on the move.
4 Days? I can't last more than 24 hs. if I don't have a reason to stay awake.
I take off my hat to you.

I get around 4-7 hours of sleep per day during the school year (mostly five); and that is not the healthiest habit.

Quote:
Normal life is a beautiful and craved for thing, when you have less than that. However, at the present moment I can't see any normality for myself; everything had been a bit too crooked around me in the past - in my view.

I would have liked to grow up and live in a perfectly normal, healthy real family. Not that my actual one is something outstanding, of course: they were two sincerely despising each other people with the notehead in passports, who had finally split up officially a a year and a half ago. Happens all the time. They had already been only tolerating one another by the time I was born; notwithstanding, they both wanted me, just separately.
Normal life may be desired or hated, it depends on the case (that's the thing with me, I want anything I can't have).
I'm the most abnormal person on a far too average family, and I dislike the fact that the normal relatives of mine can't seem to understand my difference and solitude.

Do you live alone now?

Quote:
Do you mean you never actually act according to emotions? That would be impossible for me. I don't think I'm downright thick-headed, but mostly I do whatever I feel like doing at the very moment - spontaneously. Strange how sometimes I finally understand all the logical reasons underlying my actions only years after the actual event, and find that I would have chosen the same option if I were thinking at the time.
And, sometimes, I also like to act recklessly, deliberately abandoning conscious mind, because it is... interesting. As inebriated Ippolit in the "Ирония судьбы, или С лёгким паром!" movie had complained, 'We live boringly! We lack adventurism! We've forgotten how to climb in through our beloved women's windows. We've forgotten how to do big, nice fooleries!' Entirely true; there should be more captain Greys under the scarlet sails around us.
Don't you ever do such things? I would think you do.
I listen to my emotions often, but I don't pay attention to them on major decisions. If it is something relatively important, I will analyze every possibility to the extent that it will become a real tough dilemma, and then pick the best; the results seem to disappoint me on the long run.

I'm trying to balance that though, and make spontaneous choices more often.

Quote:
Rare cases of happy real-life marriages of the Internet couples keep gnawing at the back of my mind.
-Happy real-life marriages are not as common nowadays, or so it seems-

Anyway, if you are up for it...

Quote:
What could be so exciting about football?..
I ask the same question every time; I don't get the importance out of sports and competition in general.

Quote:
Oh. What wind did bring you all together in Argentina?.. Unpredictable vicissitudes of fate, hm?
My country was one of the main points of immigration during the 30s; while English speakers went to the Northern part of the continent, the rest came to Argentina for it's similarity to Europe and good economical position.
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