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Old 01-02-2006, 01:39 PM   #161
El Virus
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I'd got some 'propaganda' from my father as well, he's a very pro-Soviets person. Opinions on the country are oftenly so extreme. There's idealizing, berating, blame on some things or the other, praise or loathing. Easy to get lost, especially when the only actual thing you yourself remember about the USSR is the money substitution: rubles and kopecks giving way to lits and cents. I was three, I suppose, and needed money for bubble-gum.

I'm half Russian, a quarter Jewish and a quartrer Tatar, by the way.
I'm guessing the situation wasn't as bad as the [USA-led/Cold War/Right Wing/Western Culture] made it seem like.

So you are indeed a Russian living in Lithuania, right?

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History of toilets definitely sounds enticing. Shame I prefer to fill my free time with Harry Potter and other endlessly un-educative matters, denying myself a chance to learn about such topical subjects. Seriously.
Reading is educative (as long as it is not Tom Clancy or any of those), and you seem to know enough.

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Why, do they really do that all the time? Now that's something unheard of. To look somebody in the eyes is considered rude, or a sign of intimate trust, here. Or maybe extravagance. As for kissing non-relatives on cheek, I was kissed only once, by way of a thank-you, and still melt at the memory.
So, what you are saying is that antisocial elements like me would have been 'frowned at', too. Is that the feature of Argentina or the other SA countries as well?
Our dialect is very informal (we have deformed the Spanish language a lot), so Argentine people are much closer than the rest of South Americans (or so I've heard).
I've been referred to as 'very cold' on more than one occassion (most times actually).

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And what did you sacrifice?
Then again, getting something special is always troublesome, one would think. Everything else, however, exists somewhere in the Internet. That's how we get most of the music nowadays, after all.
I didn't sacrifice anything, 'Nightmare' should have been the word.

My huge collection of radio serials comes from the internet. And so do most of the Russian songs I have; but as I've described on another thread, I need to have the box and stuff to feel complete.

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Also: how about Seweryn Krajewski? Or... All right, I'm curious as to what else do you listen to, from Soviet Russian music.
I'm a big fan of Russian folk and traditional songs, like the Russian sailor's dance; Калинка; and my favourite, Полюшко-поле; I also enjoy anything played on a balalaika.

I've never heard anything by Krajewski, but I'll look into him.

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Don't call ignorance Nihilism.
[...]
The only thing I've heard about India before was that it's every province had it's ruler, making India a patched-up country, plus jungles and an exceptionally serious approach to religion. Vague at best, I know.
I exaggerate a lot, remember? I find it to be a better way to make my poiny straight.
Unprofound-Nihilism is just my far-fetched way of saying complete ignorance and uninterest.

If that quote is from Conan Doyle (and I think it is), I should add that I am not a big fan of him. Nevertheless, I somehow have to agree to that.
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Old 01-04-2006, 04:46 AM   #162
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El Virus
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I'm not a big time celebrator either, It's just a new year for crisake.
I don't think New Year is a 'just'; I'd love to celebrate it properly. It's the lack of the right people, right places and that supposed christmas-spirit that makes celebration undesirable. New Year and Birthday are the biggest holidays of a year, after all. Or Christmas and Birthday, for religious folks, I guess.

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4 Days? I can't last more than 24 hs. if I don't have a reason to stay awake.
I get around 4-7 hours of sleep per day during the school year (mostly five); and that is not the healthiest habit.
I had a reason: I wanted to see how long I can last without sleep. Happened gradually: two days were usual for me at that time, then three, finally four. The more you skip sleep, the more drunk you feel. Like a constant hangover.
I envy those who feel perfectly all right sleeping only three or four hours a day.

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<...>(that's the thing with me, I want anything I can't have).
Do you live alone now?
We all want to have what we can't, I suppose. Dreaming of it makes no difference anyway. Sometimes I'd like to be a male, for example, and I'm sure that if I were one, I'd have similar ideas of being a female.

I'm materially supported by mother, so, technically, I don't 'live alone'. Practically, now I've been alone in mother's flat for a month, while she was in Israel, but her return this Friday may rise the question of my accommodation once again. I hope it won't, though; I don't particularly have anywhere to go.

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If it is something relatively important, I will analyze every possibility to the extent that it will become a real tough dilemma, and then pick the best; the results seem to disappoint me on the long run.
If results are disappointing in any case, then why bother with profound logic.
I think I've always been sort of accidentally thown into all relatively important events of my life; sometimes, when I try to weigh all the possibilities, it all becomes, as you have said, such a tough dilemma, that I end up acting instinctively at any rate.

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-Happy real-life marriages are not as common nowadays, or so it seems-
Why do you think they were more frequent in the past? It's all the same, I think; people never change in these aspects. We don't have arranged marriages as a common rule now, at least.
Besides, happy couples aren't as rare as you seem to believe. This is what I believe.

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I don't get the importance out of sports and competition in general.
Oh, come on. Sports, competitions, Olympic games in general - they're excellent, for those participating, - and even to watch the champions and wonder at fellow humans' unique abilities. And there're figure skating and gymnastics, by the way.
But it's one thing to admire that amazing strength and skill and and hard work of particular persons, and another, when two herds of inexplicit species in multicolored shorts run and jump around one stupid ball. In my opinion. Better they'd read some clever book. All right, I just don't understand it.

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I'm guessing the situation wasn't as bad as the [USA-led/Cold War/Right Wing/Western Culture] made it seem like.
I'm not sure what they made it seem like, really. Here, the largest pretensions concern the lack of decent food supplies and freedom of speech. But, well, looks like they lived on spiritual repast, so to speak; science, art, multicultural relations were on high.

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So you are indeed a Russian living in Lithuania, right?
Uhum. My father's father was a military man, so after the War he'd been constantly moving with his unit around the Baltic part of the Soviets, and he was staying in Lithuanian SSR when he retired. My mother went to work in Vilnius after she graduated from university in Saint-Petersburg, by assignment. It was the same country back then.

Say, is Spanish your first language? Do you know Italian and German?

I've just noticed Astor Piazzolla's Argentinian. Seems I know at least something coming from your country.

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Reading is educative (as long as it is not Tom Clancy or any of those), and you seem to know enough.
Who's Tom Clancy? -- See, I don't know anything.
Reading is educative, of course, but differently. You learn facts, and theories, and a lot of very handy and clever and important subjects from your books. I wasn't able to read at all for some time, and that what I now rarely read... khm. It teaches about human nature, maybe: various reactions to similar situations, reasons for unreasonable actions, good and evil traits of characters swapping over - about these ever changing elusive things, so that, naturally, it teaches nothing.

Besides, 'enough' is an elastic notion.

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I've been referred to as 'very cold' on more than one occassion (most times actually).
Huh, I wonder what would you seem like in Lithuania, for example. These people can be icebergs, sometimes.

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but as I've described on another thread, I need to have the box and stuff to feel complete.
In which thread?..
In the past, I had also felt like that, but as a collection grows, boxes become redundunt and inconvenient - for me. Isn't it much easier to stock and search for a needed item in the 100*-CD cases?

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I'm a big fan of Russian folk and traditional songs, like the Russian sailor's dance; Калинка; and my favourite, Полюшко-поле; I also enjoy anything played on a balalaika.
I've never heard anything by Krajewski, but I'll look into him.
"Полюшко-поле"? Even the title sounds ridiculous. I guess I have no interest whatsoever in Russian folk-whatever. Was fed up with калинки-рябинки-берёзки since the early childhood, and have always considered such things being meant for toddlers. Perhaps it's all too natural, native for me to understand the supposed beauty of it. Your point of view is astounding. Калинка... Офигеть можно.
Wait. "Полюшко-поле" - isn't that a military song? I don't remember hearing it, but - do you really call an army song 'folk music'?

And I didn't recommend Krajewski, I only inquired. Of course, I like him very much, but I doubt it has much to do with Russian culture. Nothing, more like.
By the way, yesterday was Krejewski's 56th birthday, which I had completely forgotten about.

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I exaggerate a lot, remember?
I'll try to remember henceforth.

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If that quote is from Conan Doyle (and I think it is), I should add that I am not a big fan of him.
I don't think I'm a fan of Conan Doyle, but that of Sherlock Holms definitely. It's sad that I've learned almost by heart all stories about him many years ago and can't enjoy the grand mysteries any more. Though I still have details to explore.
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:50 AM   #163
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Originally Posted by Charie
It's the lack of the right people, right places and that supposed christmas-spirit that makes celebration undesirable.
I think that personally I'm just sick of the yearly celebration routine I have to stand.

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I'm materially supported by mother, so, technically, I don't 'live alone'. Practically, now I've been alone in mother's flat for a month, while she was in Israel, but her return this Friday may rise the question of my accommodation once again. I hope it won't, though; I don't particularly have anywhere to go.
Does your father live in Lithuania too?

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If results are disappointing in any case, then why bother with profound logic.
I think I've always been sort of accidentally thown into all relatively important events of my life; sometimes, when I try to weigh all the possibilities, it all becomes, as you have said, such a tough dilemma, that I end up acting instinctively at any rate.
That is why I am trying to change things. A balance between both would work out for me.

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Why do you think they were more frequent in the past? It's all the same, I think; people never change in these aspects. We don't have arranged marriages as a common rule now, at least.
Besides, happy couples aren't as rare as you seem to believe. This is what I believe.
I believe in marriage and happy couples, don't get me wrong. I like the idea, furthermore.

The 'or so it seems' was there for a reason. According to the media there is a constane increase in divorce rates, and not all divorced couples end up in friendly terms. Of course, most of the things the media (television actually) says turn out to be fake or not so true.

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Oh, come on. Sports, competitions, Olympic games in general - they're excellent, for those participating, - and even to watch the champions and wonder at fellow humans' unique abilities. And there're figure skating and gymnastics, by the way.
But it's one thing to admire that amazing strength and skill and and hard work of particular persons, and another, when two herds of inexplicit species in multicolored shorts run and jump around one stupid ball. In my opinion. Better they'd read some clever book. All right, I just don't understand it.
I'm not a sports fan, or a sportsy or competitive person for that matter. But I do prefer athletism over these silly team sports which are almost an obsession for some.

Do you like sports, are are you just a viewer?

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I'm not sure what they made it seem like, really. Here, the largest pretensions concern the lack of decent food supplies and freedom of speech. But, well, looks like they lived on spiritual repast, so to speak; science, art, multicultural relations were on high.
Not sure whether that's irony or not .

But either way, decent food supplies and freedom of speech are not abundant in the so called free world or democratic countries.

In the United States of America (the auto-denominated freedom spreaders), back in the 50s people with political ideas similar to those of Communism, were black listed. Great minds who were banned from working include, Chaplin, Hammet and many other writers.

In case you are wondering, I don't believe in democracy.

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Say, is Spanish your first language? Do you know Italian and German?
Yes, Spanish is my first language. I don't care much about Italian, and I like German, but I do not really want to learn it.
Only languages I know are Spanish, English, French; and a very tiny bit of Russian and Esperanto (not that this latter one is actually useful).

What about you?

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I've just noticed Astor Piazzolla's Argentinian. Seems I know at least something coming from your country.
And most of us agree that Carlos Gardel was as well; he is the only national symbol I idolize.


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Who's Tom Clancy? -- See, I don't know anything.
Reading is educative, of course, but differently. You learn facts, and theories, and a lot of very handy and clever and important subjects from your books. I wasn't able to read at all for some time, and that what I now rarely read... khm. It teaches about human nature, maybe: various reactions to similar situations, reasons for unreasonable actions, good and evil traits of characters swapping over - about these ever changing elusive things, so that, naturally, it teaches nothing.

Besides, 'enough' is an elastic notion.
Clancy is this writer from the USA which writes very long and redundant books. They all deal with the same, and are pure American propaganda and bull****.

With enough, I mean a lot; but I don't want to be over-complimenting you .

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Huh, I wonder what would you seem like in Lithuania, for example. These people can be icebergs, sometimes.
No idea; my uncle was treated as rude when he warmly greeted a lot of people in England.

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In which thread?..
In the past, I had also felt like that, but as a collection grows, boxes become redundunt and inconvenient - for me. Isn't it much easier to stock and search for a needed item in the 100*-CD cases?
I miss Adventure Games thread, while talking about game downloading.

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"Полюшко-поле"? Even the title sounds ridiculous. I guess I have no interest whatsoever in Russian folk-whatever. Was fed up with калинки-рябинки-берёзки since the early childhood, and have always considered such things being meant for toddlers. Perhaps it's all too natural, native for me to understand the supposed beauty of it. Your point of view is astounding. Калинка... Офигеть можно.
Wait. "Полюшко-поле" - isn't that a military song? I don't remember hearing it, but - do you really call an army song 'folk music'?
Полюшко-поле's lyrics aren't anything special either, but the musical score is great and uplifting.
I think it is a pro-soviet military song, yes. I guess calling it a folk song wasn't the right thing.

What do you mean with your point of view is astounding? It all has to do with the culture, if I would have had to endure those songs constantly as a child I wouldn't be a fan of them either.
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:28 AM   #164
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Many is realy a good soul and was but that **** with "bruno" he did qualify for a train but someone ho have the acces to their bio changed it and stealed their ticket i think that same **** was hapenend to many and he stuck in dod

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Originally Posted by neon_git
I'm sure this has probably been debated quite a lot before but you'll have to forgive me because i'm new to the forums. So... Manny doesn't seem to have been a bad soul in life judging by his actions in death so why was he made to be a reaper?

My theories are that maybe when you die it might change your outlook on "life".

Or possibly you are made to forget so you don't spend your time looking back and cursing your actions instead of helping other souls.

i don't find either of these ideas really satisfying so if there are any other theories out there i'd like to hear them
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Old 06-25-2006, 12:08 PM   #165
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Wow, I had no idea people were still posting in this thread.

*sigh* it takes me back to the good old days when I didn't have to pay for my internet connection.


You mean the way the sea stays steady as a rock and the buildings keep washing up and down? Yes I thought that was odd.
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Old 08-04-2006, 11:11 AM   #166
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the problem of Salvidor introduces a whole new thing into the paying off time thing. He had a ticket, all along, but he was once a reaper. So, why? How could he both be good enough for the number nine, and yet still need to pay off time?


Viva La Revolucion!
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Old 08-04-2006, 11:13 AM   #167
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They probably lied to him. They told him he had a debt to pay, just so they could sell his ticket.


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Old 08-04-2006, 11:20 AM   #168
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But if Manny was a reaper even before the corruption took place, and if Salvidor was cheated by said corruption, then he'd be working at the same time as Manny. And Manny doesn't recognise him.


Viva La Revolucion!
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Old 08-04-2006, 11:23 AM   #169
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Hm... maybe the corruption took place before Manny was there, and he just never noticed because the phase of the plan where they steal the tickets wasn't initiated until the time around where the game started.


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Old 08-04-2006, 01:24 PM   #170
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Okay, here's one for you ... maybe the game's internal logic doesn't extend that far.

I mean we've already got the whole deal with Celso in Rubacava ... so maybe the game contradicts itself, maybe there is no explanation.

But maybe, just maybe it doesn't matter.

And maybe I'm being cynical but we're at what? 5 pages now? And still no compelling answers (I assume, I didn't actually read the whole thing). Perhaps it's time to call it a day.

But maybe that's just me ...


You mean the way the sea stays steady as a rock and the buildings keep washing up and down? Yes I thought that was odd.
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Old 08-04-2006, 02:01 PM   #171
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We can never have real answers for any of these questions. We can only speculate and, honestly, no speculation is better than another.

There could be many reasons why Manny doesn't recognise Salvador. The DOD building is huge; maybe they worked in different parts of it and never ran to each other.

However, somehow I get the impression that Salvador was a reaper before Manny's time. Maybe the corruption didn't spread very far in the beginning, so that it would remain hidden. So, maybe Salvador got screwed, left the DOD, Manny came, was a good salesman for a while until the corruption spread to his floor? No one knows.

I agree with neon_git on that repeating the same thing over and over again can get tiring, but what else do we have to do in here? Besides, someone comes up with a fresh idea every now and then.


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Old 09-07-2007, 07:56 PM   #172
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(Hmmm, well regarding Celso it is possible that he spent a bit of time walking, got attacked by some ugly demon, defended himself with his walking stick, fled, then someone else (who earned a sports car) offered him a ride to Rubacava.)

Back on topic,

What did Manny do to become a reaper since he doesn't seem such a bad guy?

First of all, I don't think becoming a reaper is really the worst form of punishment. It may actually be even better than having to walk all the way to the Ninth Underworld. Maybe there's some kind of "retirement" plan where reapers get transport to the next world and don't have to walk four years. I mean, hell, Manny even got a Number Nine ticket as a "retirement present" for helping rid the DoD of corruption, even thought he originally didn't earn it. (And no, his ticket wasn't stolen, the storyline seems to be pretty clear on that.)

It makes no sense to give the most immoral people a job of such a great responsibility. They just wouldn't do it right and would abuse their position for personal gain the first chance they'd get.

Let's consider a few facts:
1) Manny claims he doesn't know what he did. (He may have tried to hide something from Domino when he claimed this, but this is extremely doubtful considering the context in which he said it.)

I say that maybe he's just in denial. He kind of suspects what he may have done, but doesn't actually want to fully admit that what he did was wrong out of pride or something else. There's almost no way you can commit a very immoral act and not realize it. People like that are usually considered insane.

I really don't think he did something that bad like kill someone in cold blood or steal something, but it is possible that he may have been a very selfish and greedy person in life and that his decisions, actions or words, although not illegal or particulary immoral, may have still significantly influenced someone's else life in a very very bad way.

He may have hurt women's feelings by pretending to really care about them, he may have refused to help someone in desperate need, even though he could have very easily. Maybe he was in a high position and because of his selfish or harsh decisions, someone may have been forced into bankruptcy or suicide or something.

Exibit A: Even in death he displays somewhat selfish behaviour. He says "one of these days I'm going to ride the Number Nine out of here", despite knowing quite well he didn't earn a ticket. He doesn't really want to help Salvador or Meche at first, he just wants to do anything he can to leave the 9th Underworld. Of course, he seems to change over the course of the game to the point where he refuses to enter the 9th Underwolrd until the whole mess is sorted out and all the people are saved.

Exibit B: He kind of resembles a woman-chaser type.

Exibit C: He's very competitive. It's hard to believe you can just become a nightclub owner despite being broke and then a ship captain so easily without being at least somewhat greedy.

Exibit D: The punishment itself. What better way to punish a selfish person other than to force him to help countless souls out with their lifetime rewards.

Exibit E: On the Day of the Dead, he reveals that the reason he's not back home visiting the living is because there's "noone back there he wants to see". This strongly implies that he was never much of a family man.

Last edited by Torque; 09-09-2007 at 04:16 AM.
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