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Old 01-18-2006, 03:24 PM   #41
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Let's see...

Howl's Moving Castle - Diana Wyn Jones is a really really great author. This isn't her best book, but it's still very good, and a must read for anyone who enjoyed the film.

The first two "Series of Unfortunate Events" books - since these were a Remster Recomended read (tm) I had to get them! They are, of course, excellent, and I will be getting the next eleven at some point in the future.

The Silent Gondiliers - good and fun. If you're hungry for more Morgenstern after The Princess Bride, then get this.

The Republic - it's actually really good!

The Man Who Was Thursday (GK Chesterton) - I first came across this in extracts from Deus Ex. The whole thing is online here. Read the first chapter and, if you don't like it, then you clearly have no taste and shouldn't buy the book.

At the moment I'm reading Neil Gaiman's American Gods because I heard it was good.
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Old 01-19-2006, 03:39 PM   #42
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Just finished the Supernaturalists by Eoin Colfer. Very good book, very much like his other work. It plays with the emotions on the characters a lot, which in turn plays a lot on your own emotions as questions of whether what they're doing has been wrong all along are brought up. It has a very good ending which isn't as sugar coated as it could have been, which is nice and it has a very good and unique story as well.

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Old 01-20-2006, 05:15 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabez
The Man Who Was Thursday (GK Chesterton) - I first came across this in extracts from Deus Ex.
i've read that and liked it. i became aware of it through Deus Ex, too. but let me warn you about Last And First Men. that one is mentioned in the game as well (in hong kong i think), but when i started reading it last week i abandoned it after page 42. it wasn't the first time i started it either.

i also read Halo: The Flood. its predecessor (The Fall Of Reach) was a lot better, since it told the beginning of the spartans and the events that lead up to the game while this book re-tells the game's story. so there are a lot of firefights described and while Dietz does a pretty good job at keeping those interesting and varied it does get boring by the end. if you'd like to read a book directly based on a game franchise and have been disappointed by Doom and the likes, i do recommend the series so far. there's a third part (First Strike) and you can get them all in a bundle.

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Old 02-02-2006, 09:04 PM   #44
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I recently finished reading "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" for the third time. Fantastic book.


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Old 02-14-2006, 04:26 PM   #45
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I've been ploughing for Discworld. I think I'm more than half way through the series now.


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Old 02-19-2006, 12:32 PM   #46
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I've just finished Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman. Very good book andd well worth a read. I haven't read much of his other works and I've heard a lot of mixed feelings about American Gods, but most people are in agreement that Anansi Boys is a much better book. Basic premise, Fat Charlie Nancy (who isn't actually fat, but got the nickname from his father when he was a boy and has never been able to shake it) spent most of his life away from his father after his parents split up at a young age. Now, years later, he was a semi-steady job, a fiancé and a slight nevous disposition. When his father dies, Fat Charlie learns that his father was actually the God of spiders and that he has a brother, aptly named Spider. When Spider comes round for a visit, he manages to completely take over Fat Charlie's life, job and fiancé and to add insult to injury, he does it a lot better than Charlie ever could.

It's a wonderuflly humerous book with a good story and characters you can actually get behind. Overall, i give it a 5/5.

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Old 07-20-2007, 05:43 AM   #47
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If you liked Anansi Boys that much you should definitely check out American Gods. It's a great novel, one I could really sink my teeth into...

I recently finished Earth Abides by George R. Stewart and that blew me away.
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Old 07-20-2007, 10:04 AM   #48
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Actually, between the time of me writing that review and now, I have in fact read American Gods, and Neverwhere. I prefered Neverwhere, but American Gods was definately good.

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Old 07-24-2007, 12:04 AM   #49
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Oh hey...that was posted over a year ago. I guess the forum isn't as bustling with activity as it used to be.
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Old 07-24-2007, 04:20 AM   #50
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Indeed.
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Old 07-24-2007, 08:49 PM   #51
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When I saw a new post in this topic, I have to admit, given the timing I was expecting something else...


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Old 07-25-2007, 04:35 AM   #52
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HARRY POTTER!

I loved it. Anyone else a fan?
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Old 07-25-2007, 12:21 PM   #53
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I got my copy late (Tuesday) but that has been the least of my problems. Ho ho, force majeure ¬¬

[this message was posted from: Cheltenham]


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Old 07-25-2007, 03:03 PM   #54
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Definitely a good read.

I've now gone high-brow and I'm reading a collection of Kafka's short stories and novellas.


Read The Mojo!
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Old 07-25-2007, 03:30 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elTee
I got my copy late (Tuesday) but that has been the least of my problems.
If you got it by post (from Amazon say), due to the floods, most post offices didn't get orders in until Saturday when they were meant to be sent out. I didn't get mine till Monday.

Very good read.

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Old 07-25-2007, 04:22 PM   #56
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Despite the floods, my copy did actually arrive on Saturday. So did my girlfriend's. Neither of us actually got it because at 8am on Saturday morning, when it was delivered, we were in a taxi that we had been sat in since 10pm on Friday, from Bristol (normally an hour's journey at most.) It was a taxi because the train was cancelled, and I hope it cost Mr. Branson a great deal of money. *sigh*

Anyway, my copy was here but it wasn't actually delivered because some git at Amazon had hilariously cut the address-sticker a little too close to the actual address, and whilst you could still make out the name of my street, you couldn't make out my name, or indeed my house number. *sigh*

When it did eventually get here I didn't even care because I haven't had a shower since Monday, and I'm drinking water that came out of a Goddamn bowser in the middle of the street. I've only read 200 pages of it so far, I'm going to read the rest tonight - in theory, anyway.

Does that book have Metamorphosis in Remi? I know that's the most obvious Kafka book of all time, but (and also probably because of that) it's the only one I've read. Good stuff :-)


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Old 07-25-2007, 04:36 PM   #57
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Well in that case I won't ruin it for you... except to tell you that Dumbledore was in fact the Giant Squid in animagus form and the Weasley's flying car is a horcrux.

Oh, and Harry ends up dating McGonnagle.

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Old 07-26-2007, 09:40 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elTee
Does that book have Metamorphosis in Remi? I know that's the most obvious Kafka book of all time, but (and also probably because of that) it's the only one I've read. Good stuff :-)
It does indeed -- the contents can be seen here. I'm currently in the middle of "Meditation," and while I'm not always 100% sure exactly what's going on, I've come to terms with that simply being -- wait for it -- Kafkaesque.


Read The Mojo!
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Old 07-27-2007, 07:39 PM   #59
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Yes! I've finally finished HP! I'm such a slow reader, I guess! It's taken me 6 days to get through it. Anyways, very good! Not sure about the epilogue, though.

Can't say any more without spoiling it for someone, so I won't.

I actually feel like going back and re-reading all the other now!

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Old 07-27-2007, 07:58 PM   #60
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Not many liked the epilogue actually, it felt almost like wish fulfillment on JKR's part, but if you put a lot of thought into it, it does make sense that it should have been written like that and more importantly what should have been written in it.

I won't spoil it for others, but if you're after all the information you thought would be in the epilogue, but wasn't, JKR's recently done an interview filling in a few more details here (which will obviously include spoilers).

Again, almost like wish fulfillment, but I don't think we could have seen it any other way.

I read all the other books again in the run up to this one. I feel I've now had my fill of Harry Potter for a while.

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Old 07-27-2007, 10:22 PM   #61
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I'm not sure what you mean. I personally just felt the whole idea of an epilogue was a bad one, full stop. I think it would have been better to leave the characters (who survived) how you knew and loved them. To me that would have been perfect, rather than jumping forward and seeing them as people you don't know anymore.

I wouldn't have minded Rowling just explaining her thoughts on where everyone ended up in interviews and such, or maybe in another Comic Relief thing, but it just seemed horribly tacked on to the end of book 7, after all that happened.

Maybe I'll give it a day or two and see how I feel about it.

(PM me if you can't say more without spoilers being involved!)

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Old 07-28-2007, 07:27 AM   #62
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I think she wanted to have a definate ending, which the epilogue achieves. I would have liked something a bit more like the epilogue in Middlemarch, which goes into lots of detail, and mentions how some of the characters later die (this is a hard point to express: if you've read that novel you may get what I mean, however... for others, you can see the style I like by reading the Middlemarch ending here, though there are obviously spoilers).

I'm not at all disapointed with any of it, though. I'm glad we found out a bit more about what happens to the characters, and I thought the dreamy style worked well. I would have liked a better last sentence, but what we've got really isn't bad at all, and overall the story was very very enjoyable.

I also loved the Order of the Phoenix film!
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Old 02-21-2008, 04:42 PM   #63
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I read Star Wars Republic Commando - Triple Zero.
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Old 02-22-2008, 10:36 AM   #64
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I've recently been reading a collection of short stories by Neil Gaiman called "Smoke and Mirrors" which are fairly good and interesting to read and think about.

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Old 02-22-2008, 05:49 PM   #65
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Have I recommended The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch yet? If not, read it. It is by far and away the best book I've read in the last few years - if not my favourite book ever! At turns dark, gritty and believable mixed with moments of utter hilarity, some of the best and most likeable characters ever written and a plot that twists and turns like the proverbial twisty-turny thing.

Lynch's releasing one book in the series a year. The second book, Red Seas Under Red Skies, should be of particular interest to us as it's mostly a pirate novel! The third book and a collection of short stories by Lynch are both out this year.

As for right now, I'm reading The Blade Itself by Joe Abercrombie. Pretty good so far.

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Old 02-25-2008, 01:37 AM   #66
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Ive been reading Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle. Which is a very good book. I also finished The Long Walk by Stephen King which was also good.


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Old 02-25-2008, 07:57 AM   #67
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Libra, by Don Delillo, was recommended to me by my dissertation supervisor and it's fantastic. It's about the Kennedy Assassination, but the prose is incredible.


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Old 02-26-2008, 02:11 AM   #68
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I finished Planet of the Apes and have moved on to Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift. After that I plan on reading Robinson Crusoe.

Yes I like the classics


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Old 02-26-2008, 08:54 AM   #69
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Gulliver's Travels is one of the best books I've ever read. It's so unbelievably satirical, I had no idea from reading the ladybird version when I was a kid. It's absolutely hilarious, I think Swift was a genius.


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Old 02-26-2008, 03:19 PM   #70
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Just finished "War in Heaven" by Charles Williams: a metaphysical and theological adventure where an Archdeacon, a Duke and a publisher are in a conflict against a group of Satanists for the holy Graal. The writer was an Inkling, so in the same group as J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis

Also reading Watership Down (Richard Adams) which is probably the best animal literature I've ever read.
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Old 02-27-2008, 01:04 AM   #71
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It's been a while since a ridiculously good book so I'm just going to say the first ten that occur to me.

Fight Club - Chuck Palahniuk
The Shining - Stephen King
Love and Death: The Murder of Kurt Cobain - Max Wallace and Ian Halperin
lost boy lost girl - Peter Straub
Deadeye Dick - Kurt Vonnegut
A Wild Sheep Chase - Haruki Murakami
The Mayor of Casterbridge - Thomas Hardy
Treasure Island - Robert Louis Stevenson
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
Red Dragon - Thomas Harris

By the way, Gabez, The Prisoner of Zenda is the first of a trilogy; it's regarded as the best of the three but it's kinda like Monkey Island, in that you'll get a different answer on different days.
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Old 02-27-2008, 06:14 AM   #72
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I've always been tempted to go for the other Zenda books -- it's good to know that there is some difference of opinion about the sequels. I heard from one source that Zenda is easily the best, and like a fool excepted that as fact.

I also read The Mysteries of Udulpho recently (you will know it if you have read Northanger Abbey -- Austen attacked it viciously, and completely unjustifiably!) which is simmilar to Zenda and the Princess Bride being part of the Romance/Gothic/women who cry all the time and men who swordfight on castle parapets genre (which I love!)

All the books on your list look like books I'd like to read also -- with the exception of Trasure Island, which I have already read (and can very much recommend).
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Old 02-27-2008, 09:22 AM   #73
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I'm reading Grimm's fairy tales currently. It's great fun to read one story each night before going to sleep, and I can't ever look at a Disney film that's based on a fairy tale without thinking of the superior original stories.

Other books I have read recently include Pride and Prejudice - I know that's considered a girl's book, but I love the way Jane Austen paints her characters. Another book I recently read and greatly enjoyed, is The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes and Watson are a perfect duo, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a master of suspense. I'm definitely going to read the other Sherlock Holmes collections some time in the future.

And all for free, too.

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Old 02-27-2008, 10:59 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggis
I'm reading Grimm's fairy tales currently. It's great fun to read one story each night before going to sleep, and I can't ever look at a Disney film that's based on a fairy tale without thinking of the superior original stories.


And all for free, too.
I just finished reading the Grimm's, I did the exact same thing but some of them are really friggin' creepy like the original snow white.
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:01 AM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kroms
It's been a while since a ridiculously good book so I'm just going to say the first ten that occur to me.

Fight Club - Chuck Palahniuk
The Shining - Stephen King
Love and Death: The Murder of Kurt Cobain - Max Wallace and Ian Halperin
lost boy lost girl - Peter Straub
Deadeye Dick - Kurt Vonnegut
A Wild Sheep Chase - Haruki Murakami
The Mayor of Casterbridge - Thomas Hardy
Treasure Island - Robert Louis Stevenson
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
Red Dragon - Thomas Harris
fight club is probably my favorite book of all time with anything by william s. burroughs a close second
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Old 02-27-2008, 12:25 PM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggis
Other books I have read recently include Pride and Prejudice - I know that's considered a girl's book, but I love the way Jane Austen paints her characters. Another book I recently read and greatly enjoyed, is The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes and Watson are a perfect duo, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a master of suspense. I'm definitely going to read the other Sherlock Holmes collections some time in the future.

And all for free, too.
One of the things I'm most ashamed about is how I didn't read Austen until I was 18 because I thought she was a "womanly" writer (presumably because she's a woman). But Austen is great. She captures characters, like you said, very well. You get a real picture of society -- and it's all still so relevant. Austen doesn't date at all. Though I think I prefer George Eliot.

Haven't read Doyle, but I want to. I think he'd be a good one for me to listen to on audio book.

Do you print off the texts, Haggis, or do you read them off a screen? Or a PDA? I don't think I'd be able to do any of these -- but I make good use of my university library.
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Old 02-27-2008, 12:41 PM   #77
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So suddenly discussion of books is back on or something. Well yah, if we're talking recently say last eight months I've done several.

His Dark Materials - Phillip Pullman
Read Golden Compass way back in 1996 when I got it for Christmas, I'm sure I had Subtle Knife out of the library at some point but my pattern back then was to check out around fifteen books at a time and boohoo if I forget to get to one of them. When I realized the film would be coming out (Lets say start of 2007), I got the other two books in hardcover read the entire series through in about four days, during which nobody thankfully came around to distract me as I'd just had my wisdom teeth yanked out. I didn't actually get out to see the film though and I heard they'd ****ed it up slightly which is quite disheartening.

Midnight's Children - Salman Rushdie
Actually started back at the start of 2007 but wasn't finished until sometime in August due to several hiatus's. Excellent story of India's independence and the aftermath told through magic realism.

Step across this Line - Salman Rushdie
Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002. Good stuff was bought for a trip to Florida and finished during breaks at work.

Gravity's Rainbow - Thomas Pynchon
Attempted to read but had a hard time concentrating with all my ****ing coworkers jabbering around me. I'll probably make another attempt to read some time this year.

Sex and Repression in Savage Society - Bronislaw Malinowski
I had more success reading a nonfiction anthropological piece despite coworkers depositing queries every five minutes in regards to if dix had come up yet. Good stuff.

Old Man's War - John Scalzi
Good Sci-fi, I don't really feel like giving a synopsis.

The Ghost Brigades - John Scalzi
Sequel to the above, also good. There is a third book thats been out since sometime last year but the paper back hasn't come out yet and my bookshelf would look silly if I had a great big hardcover next to the other two which I have in paperback.

Grimus - Salman Rushdie
Attempted reading but was bored out of my mind. Note this is Rushdie's first novel and he hadn't quite developed his style yet. I'll probably go back and finish it for ****s and giggles, even though it put me in one hell of a rut.

Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson
The book to snap my out of the rut that Grimus put me into. It didn't take long for me to decide that Stephenson is a genius and that I must read everything he ever wrote.

The Diamond Age - Neal Stephenson
Hinted at as the sequel to Snow Crash, also excellent.

The Dogs of War - Frederick Forsyth
At some point or another I acquired an interest in nation theft, I can't say why. It was great and I've got a few more Forsyth books sitting around that I'll have to get to.

Zodiac - Neal Stephenson
Stephenson's second Novel, a thriller with ecology central to the plot. I'm not sure what happened with this one but I got snapped into overdrive somehow and finished it in about four days (While at work). Really excellent and funny.

IN PROGRESS:
Cryptonomicon - Neal Stephenson
More thriller than Sci-fi with elements of historical fiction/alternative history (All how you look at it really), focussed on the subjects of information warfare and cryptology.

Newton's Cannon: Book one of the age of Unreason Steampunk, alternative history set in the early 1700's in a world where the alchemy that many in the time believed in turns out to be real.

Looking forward to this year:
The Enchantress of Florence - Salman Rushdie
Scheduled for a June release in the US, but I'm such a bastard that I'll probably have it imported in April.

Once Upon a Time in the North - Phillip Pullman
Second small companion novella to His Dark Materials.

Anathem - Neal Stephenson
After doing historical fiction/alternative history stuff for several years Stephenson is supposedly going back to sci-fi.
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Old 02-27-2008, 01:59 PM   #78
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Originally Posted by Gabez
Do you print off the texts, Haggis, or do you read them off a screen? Or a PDA? I don't think I'd be able to do any of these -- but I make good use of my university library.
I read them on a PDA, in bed, almost every night before I go to sleep. I find that that way, I'm able to read a lot more than I would if I just read print books, because during the day I do a lot of other stuff, and I just ignore my books most of the time.

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Old 02-27-2008, 02:55 PM   #79
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A PDA in bed sounds like quite a good way, actually. Though I love the feel and smell of real books far too much.

Samnmax: I love Philip Pullman -- and I'm looking forward to Once Upon a Time in the North as well. I'd recommend all of Pullman's books (especially clockwork which is small & overlooked & perfect). The film was good -- they didn't mess it up -- though it wasn't perfect. But they might not make the sequels because it didn't do well in America. It's a shame because I really want to see the sequels as films (the Lyra is perfect). I've heard "I didn't see it because I heard that they were rubbish" from other people as well, which is a shame. If you liked the books go see the film and make up your own mind! The film is definitely worth seeing. And it's better than most other films.
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Old 02-27-2008, 03:44 PM   #80
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I kept a really close eye the movie all of last year but December turned into such a busy month (****ing retail, at ****ing night, glad thats over with) that I didn't have time to get out and see it after all that anticipation.
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