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Old 03-11-2009, 07:59 PM   #1
Sven_Q45
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German words

Now I must ask a question, too. Ok the question is stupid like the German words. No really, why do you english people often use the German word "Gesundheit"? For example in Zak on Mars or in the Stuttgart episode from Sam and Max Season 2. Iīm so proud of Season 2. It comes out in Germany in Juli. Well I must play it cuz I live near Stuttgart. Played the demo.

Well back to my stupid question.
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Old 03-12-2009, 11:10 AM   #2
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It says here that the expression came form Jewish immigrants to the US. Why it got widespread use, nobody knows... it's just one of those things where somehow a foreign word becomes commonplace, kind of like with the Dutch word 'apartheid', for instance.

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Old 03-12-2009, 01:26 PM   #3
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Well, as Haggis said, Jewish immigrants probably brought it from the Fatherland, but it became a trend..so to say It's like saying words like 'awesome' or 'cool' in today's society. Maybe 'Gesundheit' doesn't mean the same as 'cool' it is still very much a habit or trend....that's just my opinion though


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Old 03-12-2009, 01:57 PM   #4
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Speaking of German words, in Dutch we also have some that are used pretty regularly - 'überhaupt', 'sowieso', 'unheimlich', and 'fingerspitzengefühl' are some that I can think of.

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Old 03-12-2009, 02:10 PM   #5
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Hee hee, that's true, those words are awesome


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Old 03-12-2009, 02:42 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Haggis View Post
Speaking of German words, in Dutch we also have some that are used pretty regularly - 'überhaupt', 'sowieso', 'unheimlich', and 'fingerspitzengefühl' are some that I can think of.
Dude, I didn't know you were Dutch. Awesome!

There's quite a lot of 'mixing' of languages going on. We use a lot of French, English, German etc. I tried to think of other Dutch words that they use in other countries, but 'apartheid' was the only one I could think of. Surely we have better words?

I always thought of 'Houdoe' as one of the warmest greetings we have, everyone should start using it. Of course, with Haggis living in Rotterdam, he will probably disagree.
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Old 03-12-2009, 03:06 PM   #7
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You know, that reminds me, most of the English language is comprised of Dutch and Deutsch{} words...for instance...'school'


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Old 03-12-2009, 03:27 PM   #8
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I'm not sure that "most" of thew English language is Dutch/Deutsch. School, anyway, is a Latin word (schola), and found in almost all the Roman Teutonic, and Celtic languages. It's even in Welsh: Ysgol.
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Old 03-12-2009, 03:29 PM   #9
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Oh, true, then some is comprised of Dutch/Deutsch words Thanks Gabez


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Old 03-12-2009, 05:25 PM   #10
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Well we in Swabia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swabia) often use 3 French words for example trottoir and plafont cuz there were Frechmens here. Don´t know when. The third word I can´t write. But we speek it otherwise.
And in Germany we often say ciao. That´s Italian. And very often English words in advertising and slogans.

@AlfredJ
Yes like Danish. They use many German, French, English and Dutch words.
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Old 03-12-2009, 05:50 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by AlfredJ View Post
There's quite a lot of 'mixing' of languages going on. We use a lot of French, English, German etc. I tried to think of other Dutch words that they use in other countries, but 'apartheid' was the only one I could think of. Surely we have better words?
'Boomslang' is another one, although I suspect that's more Afrikaans than English. Of course 'Afrikaans' is itself a Dutch word...

Quote:
I always thought of 'Houdoe' as one of the warmest greetings we have, everyone should start using it. Of course, with Haggis living in Rotterdam, he will probably disagree.
Well, at least it's better than 'doei'. I don't actually say 'houdoe' myself, but I have some relatives who are from Brabant (Wikipedia link for those not from the Netherlands), so I'm not completely against it. My own parents have even lived there for a while, and of course many Rotterdammers were originally farmers who lived in Brabant and Zeeland, but came to Rotterdam when the economy was booming.

Interesting how this is turning into a history/culture/language lecture.

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Old 03-12-2009, 05:55 PM   #12
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Kindergarten is a german compound that is used here in the States. Also here in New York City we have strange sounding boroughs such as Manhattan,Queens,The Bronx,Staten Island,and Brooklyn. I think does are Dutch words right?
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Old 03-12-2009, 06:02 PM   #13
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Kindergarten is a german compound that is used here in the States. Also here in New York City we have strange sounding boroughs such as Manhattan,Queens,The Bronx,Staten Island,and Brooklyn. I think does are Dutch words right?
A lot of the names in present-day New York derive from Dutch, yeah. 'Staten' is a Dutch word, for instance, 'Brooklyn' derives from the Dutch village 'Breukelen', and 'Flushing Meadows' comes from 'Vlissingen', also a Dutch town. Of course the Dutch made quite a mark on New York history, and if you're interested in that, I'd recommend this book.

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Old 03-12-2009, 06:42 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sven_Q45 View Post
Well we in Swabia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swabia) often use 3 French words for example trottoir and plafont cuz there were Frechmens here. Donīt know when. The third word I canīt write. But we speek it otherwise.
I think another one is parapluie (umbrella)... at least that's what a friend of mine (from Swabia) told me.

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Old 03-12-2009, 07:26 PM   #15
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I don´t use the word umbrella. Btw didn´t know.

And I don´t use the other words. I´ve an accent but I speak Hochdeutsch. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_German_languages
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Old 03-12-2009, 07:29 PM   #16
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A lot of the names in present-day New York derive from Dutch, yeah. 'Staten' is a Dutch word, for instance, 'Brooklyn' derives from the Dutch village 'Breukelen', and 'Flushing Meadows' comes from 'Vlissingen', also a Dutch town. Of course the Dutch made quite a mark on New York history, and if you're interested in that, I'd recommend this book.
I know its in my history textbook from 2004!
Yay 4 oldness!
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Old 03-12-2009, 07:34 PM   #17
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I found this pie chart to be more interesting than pie charts typically ought to be:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...h_PieChart.svg

It doesn't really highlight the imports from Dutch, Spanish, Yiddish, and other sources into American English, though.

Also: Cookies (as opposed to biscuits)


Guy.
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Old 03-13-2009, 03:40 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Haggis View Post
A lot of the names in present-day New York derive from Dutch, yeah. 'Staten' is a Dutch word, for instance, 'Brooklyn' derives from the Dutch village 'Breukelen', and 'Flushing Meadows' comes from 'Vlissingen', also a Dutch town. Of course the Dutch made quite a mark on New York history, and if you're interested in that, I'd recommend this book.
Itīs often called New Amsterdam.
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